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Title: SU-F-T-221: An Assessment of the Potential for Improved Local Control of Skull- Base Chordomas Via Reduction of the Proton Beam Range Uncertainty

Abstract

Purpose: The beam range uncertainty presents a special challenge for proton therapy. Novel technologies currently under development offer strategies to reduce the range uncertainty [1,2]. This work quantifies the potential advantages that could be realized by such a reduction for dosimetrically challenging chordomas at the base of skull. Therapeutic improvement was assessed by evaluating tumor control probabilities (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods: Treatment plans were made for a modulated-scanned proton delivery technique using the Eclipse treatment planning system. The prescription dose was 7920 cGy to the CTV. Three different range uncertainty scenarios were considered: 5 mm (3.5% of the beam range + 1 mm, representing current clinical practice, “Curr”), 2 mm (1.3%), and 1 mm (0.7%). For each of 4 patients, 3 different PTVs were defined via uniform expansion of the CTV by the value of the range uncertainty. Tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for organs-at-risk (OARs) were calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman[3] formalism and published model parameters [ref Terahara[4], quantec S10, Burman Red Journal v21 pp 123]. Our plan optimization strategy was to achieve PTV close to prescription while maintaining OAR NTCP values at or better than the Curr plan. Results: Themore » average TCP values for the 5, 2, and 1 mm range uncertainty scenarios are 51%, 55% and 65%. The improvement in TCP for patients was between 4 and 30%, depending primarily on the proximity of the GTV to OAR. The average NTCPs for the brainstem and cord were about 4% and 1%, respectively, for all target margins. Conclusion: For base of skull chordomas, reduced target margins can substantially increase the TCP without increasing the NTCP. This work demonstrates the potential significance of a reduction in the range uncertainty for proton beams.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648838
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; NEOPLASMS; PLANNING; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; TCP

Citation Formats

Muller, L, Soldner, A, Kirk, M, Fager, M, Solberg, T, Robert, L, and Dolney, D. SU-F-T-221: An Assessment of the Potential for Improved Local Control of Skull- Base Chordomas Via Reduction of the Proton Beam Range Uncertainty. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956360.
Muller, L, Soldner, A, Kirk, M, Fager, M, Solberg, T, Robert, L, & Dolney, D. SU-F-T-221: An Assessment of the Potential for Improved Local Control of Skull- Base Chordomas Via Reduction of the Proton Beam Range Uncertainty. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956360.
Muller, L, Soldner, A, Kirk, M, Fager, M, Solberg, T, Robert, L, and Dolney, D. Wed . "SU-F-T-221: An Assessment of the Potential for Improved Local Control of Skull- Base Chordomas Via Reduction of the Proton Beam Range Uncertainty". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956360.
@article{osti_22648838,
title = {SU-F-T-221: An Assessment of the Potential for Improved Local Control of Skull- Base Chordomas Via Reduction of the Proton Beam Range Uncertainty},
author = {Muller, L and Soldner, A and Kirk, M and Fager, M and Solberg, T and Robert, L and Dolney, D},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The beam range uncertainty presents a special challenge for proton therapy. Novel technologies currently under development offer strategies to reduce the range uncertainty [1,2]. This work quantifies the potential advantages that could be realized by such a reduction for dosimetrically challenging chordomas at the base of skull. Therapeutic improvement was assessed by evaluating tumor control probabilities (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods: Treatment plans were made for a modulated-scanned proton delivery technique using the Eclipse treatment planning system. The prescription dose was 7920 cGy to the CTV. Three different range uncertainty scenarios were considered: 5 mm (3.5% of the beam range + 1 mm, representing current clinical practice, “Curr”), 2 mm (1.3%), and 1 mm (0.7%). For each of 4 patients, 3 different PTVs were defined via uniform expansion of the CTV by the value of the range uncertainty. Tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for organs-at-risk (OARs) were calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman[3] formalism and published model parameters [ref Terahara[4], quantec S10, Burman Red Journal v21 pp 123]. Our plan optimization strategy was to achieve PTV close to prescription while maintaining OAR NTCP values at or better than the Curr plan. Results: The average TCP values for the 5, 2, and 1 mm range uncertainty scenarios are 51%, 55% and 65%. The improvement in TCP for patients was between 4 and 30%, depending primarily on the proximity of the GTV to OAR. The average NTCPs for the brainstem and cord were about 4% and 1%, respectively, for all target margins. Conclusion: For base of skull chordomas, reduced target margins can substantially increase the TCP without increasing the NTCP. This work demonstrates the potential significance of a reduction in the range uncertainty for proton beams.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956360},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: Treatment planning for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) for head and neck cancer is time-consuming due to the large number of organs-at-risk (OAR) to be considered. As there are many competing objectives and also wide range of acceptable OAR constraints, the final approved plan may not be most optimal for the given structures. We evaluated the dose reduction to the contralateral parotid by implementing standardized constraints during optimization for scanning beam proton therapy planning. Methods: Twenty-four (24) consecutive patients previously treated for base of tongue carcinoma were retrospectively selected. The doses were 70Gy, 63Gy and 57Gy (SIB in 33more » fractions) for high-, intermediate-, and standard-risk clinical target volumes (CTV), respectively; the treatment included bilateral neck. Scanning beams using MFO with standardized bilateral anterior oblique and PA fields were applied. New plans where then developed and optimized by employing additional contralateral parotid constraints at multiple defined dose levels. Using a step-wise iterative process, the volume-based constraints at each level were then further reduced until known target coverages were compromised. The newly developed plans were then compared to the original clinically approved plans using paired student t-testing. Results: All 24 newly optimized treatment plans maintained initial plan quality as compared to the approved plans, and the 98% prescription dose coverage to the CTV’s were not compromised. Representative DVH comparison is shown in FIGURE 1. The contralateral parotid doses were reduced at all levels of interest when systematic constraints were applied to V10, V20, V30 and V40Gy (All P<0.0001; TABLE 1). Overall, the mean contralateral parotid doses were reduced by 2.26 Gy on average, a ∼13% relative improvement. Conclusion: Applying systematic and volume-based contralateral parotid constraints for IMPT planning significantly reduced the dose at all dosimetric levels for patients with base of tongue cancer.« less
  • Purpose: Recurrent chordomas are difficult to control locally. This dosimetric study investigates the feasibility of dose escalation to hypoxic regions, visualized on FMISO-PET, while respecting the dose constraints to the neighboring normal tissues/organs. We propose to deliver a higher dose to the areas of hypoxia (84.5Gy) using IMPT with the goal of improving local control. Methods: We currently have four patients with hypoxic subvolumes (HSV) greater than 10cc from the FMISO-PET image. The HSV was delineated based on the standardized uptake values of greater than 1.4 times of the muscle mean. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated using planning CTmore » with the assistance of MRI fusion. The dose scheme is 50.4Gy RBE to CTV in 1.8Gy fractions, followed by an integrated boost of 27.0Gy RBE to GTV in 1.8Gy fractions and 34.5Gy RBE to HSV in 2.3Gy fractions. IMPT integrated boost plans were optimized with multi-criteria optimization (MCO). Posterior-anterior beam angles were used for these plans. We also propose using two posterior oblique fields to boost HSV to spare the skin folding. A medium spot size with 8mm to 15 mm (σ) in air at isocenter with energies from 220 MeV down to 90 MeV was used. Aperture was used for the medium spot size. A small spot size of 2.5 mm to 4.5 mm (σ) in air at isocenter with energies from 240 MeV down to 70 MeV was also proposed. Target coverage and dose to OARs were evaluated. Results: For the sacral chordoma patient that has been planned, the target homogeneity index is 3.2% for HSV, 55.9% for CTV and 11.9% for GTV. The max dose is 77GyRBE to rectum, 86.2GyRBE to sacral nerves and 73.9GyRBE to cauda equina. Conclusion: IMPT with integrated high dose boost to HSV determined from FMISO PET image is feasible. OAR dose constraints were met.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate effectiveness and safety of spot-scanning-based proton radiotherapy (PT) in skull-base chordomas and chondrosarcomas. Methods and Materials: Between October 1998 and November 2005, 64 patients with skull-base chordomas (n = 42) and chondrosarcomas (n = 22) were treated at Paul Scherrer Institute with PT using spot-scanning technique. Median total dose for chordomas was 73.5 Gy(RBE) and 68.4 Gy(RBE) for chondrosarcomas at 1.8-2.0 Gy(RBE) dose per fraction. Local control (LC), disease specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated. Toxicity was assessed according to CTCAE, v. 3.0. Results: Mean follow-up period was 38 months (range, 14-92 months).more » Five patients with chordoma and one patient with chondrosarcoma experienced local recurrence. Actuarial 5-year LC rates were 81% for chordomas and 94% for chondrosarcomas. Brainstem compression at the time of PT (p = 0.007) and gross tumor volume >25 mL (p = 0.03) were associated with lower LC rates. Five years rates of DSS and OS were 81% and 62% for chordomas and 100% and 91% for chondrosarcomas, respectively. High-grade late toxicity consisted of one patient with Grade 3 and one patient with Grade 4 unilateral optic neuropathy, and two patients with Grade 3 central nervous system necrosis. No patient experienced brainstem toxicity. Actuarial 5-year freedom from high-grade toxicity was 94%. Conclusions: Our data indicate safety and efficacy of spot-scanning based PT for skull-base chordomas and chondrosarcomas. With target definition, dose prescription and normal organ tolerance levels similar to passive-scattering based PT series, complication-free, tumor control and survival rates are at present comparable.« less
  • Purpose: PlanIQ(Sun Nuclear Corporation) can provide feasibility measures on organs-at-risk(OARs) around the target based on depth, local anatomy density and energy of radiation beam used. This study is to test and evaluate PlanIQ feasibility DVHs as optimization objectives in the treatment planning process, and to investigate the potential to use them in routine clinical cases to improve planning efficiency. Methods: Two to three arcs VMAT Treatment plans were generated in Pinnacle based on PlanIQ feasibility DVH for six skull base patients who previously treated with SBRT. The PlanIQ feasibility DVH for each OAR consists of four zones – impossible (atmore » 100% target coverage), difficult, challenging and probable. Constrains to achieve DVH in difficult zone were used to start plan optimization. Further adjustment was made to improve coverage. The plan DVHs were compared to PlanIQ feasibility DVH to assess the dose received by 0%(D0), 5%(D5), 10%(D10) and 50%(D50) of the OAR volumes. Results: A total of 90 OARs were evaluated for 6 patients (mean 15 OARs, range 11–18 OARs). We used >98% PTV coverage as planning goal since it’s difficult to achieve 100% target coverage. For the generated plans, 96.7% of the OARs achieved D0 or D5 within difficult zone or impossible zone (ipsilateral OARs 93.5%, contralateral OARs 100%), while 90% and 65.6% of the OARs achieved D10 and D50 within difficult zone, respectively. Seventeen of the contralateral and out of field OARs achieved DVHs in impossible zone. For OARs adjacent or overlapped with target volume, the D0 and D5 are challenging to be optimized into difficult zone. All plans were completed within 2–4 adjustments to improve target coverage and uniformity. Conclusion: PlanIQ feasibility tool has the potential to provide difficult but achievable initial optimization objectives and therefore reduce the planning time to obtain a well optimized plan.« less
  • Purpose: 1) To describe the characteristics of pencil beam proton dose deposition kernels in a homogenous medium using a novel parameterization. 2) To propose a method utilizing this novel parametrization to reduce the measurements and pre-computation required in commissioning a pencil beam proton therapy system. Methods: Using beam data from a clinical, pencil beam proton therapy center, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to characterize the dose depositions at a range of energies from 100.32 to 226.08 MeV in 3.6MeV steps. At each energy, the beam is defined at the surface of the phantom by a two-dimensional Normal distribution. Using FLUKA,more » the in-medium dose distribution is calculated in 200×200×350 mm cube with 1 mm{sup 3} tally volumes. The calculated dose distribution in each 200×200 slice perpendicular to the beam axis is then characterized using a symmetric alpha-stable distribution centered on the beam axis. This results in two parameters, α and γ, that completely describe shape of the distribution. In addition, the total dose deposited on each slice is calculated. The alpha-stable parameters are plotted as function of the depth in-medium, providing a representation of dose deposition along the pencil beam. We observed that these graphs are isometric through a scaling of both abscissa and ordinate map the curves. Results: Using interpolation of the scaling factors of two source curves representative of different beam energies, we predicted the parameters of a third curve at an intermediate energy. The errors are quantified by the maximal difference and provide a fit better than previous methods. The maximal energy difference between the source curves generating identical curves was 21.14MeV. Conclusion: We have introduced a novel method to parameterize the in-phantom properties of pencil beam proton dose depositions. For the case of the Knoxville IBA system, no more than nine pencil beams have to be fully characterized.« less