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Title: SU-F-T-197: Investigating Optimal Oblique-Beam Arrangement for Bilateral Metallic Prosthesis Prostate Cancer in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

Abstract

Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to investigate the optimum oblique-beam arrangement for bilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer treatment in pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. Methods: A computed tomography dataset of bilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer case was selected for this retrospective study. A total of four beams (rightanterior- oblique [RAO], left-anterior-oblique [LAO], left-posterior-oblique [LPO], and right-posterior-oblique [RPO]) were selected for treatment planning. PBS plans were generated using multi-field-optimization technique for a total dose of 79.2 Gy[RBE] to be delivered in 44 fractions. Specifically, five different PBS plans were generated based on 2.5% ± 2 mm range uncertainty using five different beam arrangements (i)LAO+RAO+LPO+RPO, (ii)LAO+RAO, (iii)LPO+RPO, (iv)RAO+LPO, and (v)LAO+RPO. Each PBS plan was optimized by applying identical dose-volume constraints to the PTV, rectum, and bladder. Treatment plans were then compared based on the dose-volume histograms results. Results: The PTV coverage was found to be greater than 99% in all five plans. The homogeneity index (HI) was found to be almost identical (range, 0.03–0.04). The PTV mean dose was found to be comparable (range, 81.0–81.1 Gy[RBE]). For the rectum, the lowest mean dose (8.0 Gy[RBE]) and highest mean dose (31.1 Gy[RBE]) were found in RAO+LAO plan and LPO+RPOmore » plan, respectively. LAO+RAO plan produced the most favorable dosimetric results of the rectum in the medium-dose region (V50) and high-dose region (V70). For the bladder, the lowest (5.0 Gy[RBE]) and highest mean dose (10.3 Gy[RBE]) were found in LPO+RPO plan and RAO+LAO plan, respectively. Other dosimetric results (V50 and V70) of the bladder were slightly better in LPO+RPO plan than in other plans. Conclusion: Dosimetric findings from this study suggest that two anterior-oblique proton beams arrangement (LAO+RAO) is a more favorable option with the possibility of reducing rectal dose significantly while maintaining comparable target coverage and acceptable bladder dose.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. McLaren Proton Therapy Center, Karmanos Cancer Institute at McLaren-Flint, Flint, MI (United States)
  2. Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)
  3. Vantage Oncology, West Hills, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648814
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BLADDER; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; LEAD SULFIDES; NEOPLASMS; PLANNING; PROSTATE; PROSTHESES; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; RBE; RECTUM

Citation Formats

Rana, S, Tesfamicael, B, Park, S, Zheng, Y, Singh, H, Twyford, T, and Cheng, C. SU-F-T-197: Investigating Optimal Oblique-Beam Arrangement for Bilateral Metallic Prosthesis Prostate Cancer in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956334.
Rana, S, Tesfamicael, B, Park, S, Zheng, Y, Singh, H, Twyford, T, & Cheng, C. SU-F-T-197: Investigating Optimal Oblique-Beam Arrangement for Bilateral Metallic Prosthesis Prostate Cancer in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956334.
Rana, S, Tesfamicael, B, Park, S, Zheng, Y, Singh, H, Twyford, T, and Cheng, C. 2016. "SU-F-T-197: Investigating Optimal Oblique-Beam Arrangement for Bilateral Metallic Prosthesis Prostate Cancer in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956334.
@article{osti_22648814,
title = {SU-F-T-197: Investigating Optimal Oblique-Beam Arrangement for Bilateral Metallic Prosthesis Prostate Cancer in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy},
author = {Rana, S and Tesfamicael, B and Park, S and Zheng, Y and Singh, H and Twyford, T and Cheng, C},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to investigate the optimum oblique-beam arrangement for bilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer treatment in pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. Methods: A computed tomography dataset of bilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer case was selected for this retrospective study. A total of four beams (rightanterior- oblique [RAO], left-anterior-oblique [LAO], left-posterior-oblique [LPO], and right-posterior-oblique [RPO]) were selected for treatment planning. PBS plans were generated using multi-field-optimization technique for a total dose of 79.2 Gy[RBE] to be delivered in 44 fractions. Specifically, five different PBS plans were generated based on 2.5% ± 2 mm range uncertainty using five different beam arrangements (i)LAO+RAO+LPO+RPO, (ii)LAO+RAO, (iii)LPO+RPO, (iv)RAO+LPO, and (v)LAO+RPO. Each PBS plan was optimized by applying identical dose-volume constraints to the PTV, rectum, and bladder. Treatment plans were then compared based on the dose-volume histograms results. Results: The PTV coverage was found to be greater than 99% in all five plans. The homogeneity index (HI) was found to be almost identical (range, 0.03–0.04). The PTV mean dose was found to be comparable (range, 81.0–81.1 Gy[RBE]). For the rectum, the lowest mean dose (8.0 Gy[RBE]) and highest mean dose (31.1 Gy[RBE]) were found in RAO+LAO plan and LPO+RPO plan, respectively. LAO+RAO plan produced the most favorable dosimetric results of the rectum in the medium-dose region (V50) and high-dose region (V70). For the bladder, the lowest (5.0 Gy[RBE]) and highest mean dose (10.3 Gy[RBE]) were found in LPO+RPO plan and RAO+LAO plan, respectively. Other dosimetric results (V50 and V70) of the bladder were slightly better in LPO+RPO plan than in other plans. Conclusion: Dosimetric findings from this study suggest that two anterior-oblique proton beams arrangement (LAO+RAO) is a more favorable option with the possibility of reducing rectal dose significantly while maintaining comparable target coverage and acceptable bladder dose.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956334},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To investigate the impact of anatomy/setup variations on standard vs. hypofractionated anterolateral pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods: Six prostate cancer patients treated with double-scattering proton therapy, who underwent weekly verification CT scans were selected. Implanted fiducials were used for localization, and endorectal balloons for immobilization. New PBS plans using combination of lateral and anterior-oblique (AO) (±35 deg) beams were created. AO beams were added to spare the femoral heads during hypofractionation. Lateral beams delivered 50.4 Gy(RBE) to prostate plus 5-15mm of seminal vesicles and AO beams 28.8 Gy(RBE) to prostate, in 44 fractions. PTVmore » was laterally expanded by 2.5% to account for range uncertainty. No range margins were applied for AO beams, assuming delivery with in-vivo range verification. Field-specific apertures with 1.2cm margin were used. Spot size was ∼9.5mm sigma for 172MeV @isocenter in air. Plans were optimized as single-field-uniform-dose with ∼5% maximum non-uniformity. The planned dose was recomputed on each weekly CT after aligning the fiducials with the simulation CT, scaled and accumulated via deformable image registration. Hypofractionated treatments with 12 and 5 fractions were considered. Equivalent doses were calculated for prostate (α/β= 1.5Gy), bladder and rectum (α/β= 3Gy). Results: The biological equivalent prostate dose was 86.2 and 92.9 Gyeq for the hypofractionation scenarios at 4.32 and 7.35 Gy/fx, respectively. The equivalent prostate D98 was degraded by on average 2.7 Gyeq for standard, and 3.1 and 4.0 Gyeq for the hypofractionated plans after accumulation. Differences between accumulated and planned Dmean/D2/EUD were generally reduced when reducing the number of fractions for bladder and rectum. The average Dmean/D2/EUD differences over all patients and organs-at-risk were 0.74/4.0/9.23, 0.49/3.64/5.51, 0.37/3.21/3.49 Gyeq for 44, 12 and 5 fractions. Conclusion: Hypofractionation makes proton therapy of prostate more susceptible to interfractional motion-induced target dose degradation compared to the standard fractionation.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of hypo-fractionated intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for unilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer patients based on proton collaborative group (PCG)-GU002-10 (NCT01230866) protocol criteria. Methods: A total of five unilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer cases were included in this retrospective study. For each case, IMPT plans were generated for treatment to be delivered with 7.6 Gy[RBE] per fraction in 5 fractions per week for a total dose of 38 Gy(RBE). Each plan was generated using two anterior-oblique beams and one lateral beam. Treatment plans were optimized with an objectivemore » meeting PCG-GU002-10 (NCT01230866) protocol criteria: (i) planning target volume (PTV): D99.5% > 36.1 Gy[RBE], (ii) rectum: V24 < 35%, V33.6 < 10%, (iii) bladder: V39 < 8 cc, and (iv) femoral head: V23 < 1cc. Results: All five cases satisfied PTV D99.5% (average=36.82 Gy[RBE]; range, 36.36–37.13 Gy[RBE]). PTV D95% ranged from 36.66 Gy[RBE] to 38.65 Gy[RBE] and PTV V100 ranged from 95.47% to 97.95%. For the rectum, V24 was less than 35% (average=14.07 Gy[RBE]; range, 6.22–18.42%, whereas V33.6 Gy[RBE] was less than 10% (average=6.83; range, 3.06 – 9.15%). Rectal mean dose ranged from 4.22 Gy[RBE] to 9.97 Gy[RBE]. For the bladder, V39 was found to be less than 8 cc (average=3.69 cc; range, 0.19–7.68 cc). Bladder mean dose ranged from 4.22 Gy[RBE] to 18.83 Gy[RBE]. For the femoral head, V23 was 0 in all five cases. Conclusion: All five unilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer IMPT plans generated with one lateral and two anterior-oblique beams satisfied the dosimetric criteria of PCG-GU002-10 (NCT01230866) protocol.« less
  • Megavoltage photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is typically used in the treatment of prostate cancer at our institution. Approximately 1% to 2% of patients with prostate cancer have hip prostheses. The presence of the prosthesis usually complicates the planning process because of dose perturbation around the prosthesis, radiation attenuation through the prosthesis, and the introduction of computed tomography artifacts in the planning volume. In addition, hip prostheses are typically made of materials of high atomic number, which add uncertainty to the dosimetry of the prostate and critical organs in the planning volume. When the prosthesis is bilateral, treatment planning ismore » further complicated because only a limited number of beam angles can be used to avoid the prostheses. In this case study, we will report the observed advantages of using noncoplanar beams in the delivery of IMRT to a prostate cancer patient with bilateral hip prostheses. The treatment was planned for 75.6 Gy using a 7-field coplanar approach and a noncoplanar arrangement, with all fields avoiding entrance though the prostheses. Our results indicate that, compared with the coplanar plan, the noncoplanar plan delivers the prescribed dose to the target with a slightly better conformality and sparing of rectal tissue versus the coplanar plan.« less
  • Purpose: To develop a clinical feasible and robust proton therapy technique to spare bowel, bladder and rectum for high-risk prostate cancer patients Methods: The study includes 3 high-risk prostate cancer cases treated with bilateral opposed SFUD with lateral penumbra gradient matching technique prescribed to 5400cGyE in 30 fx in our institution. To treat whole pelvic lymph node chain, the complicated ‘H’ shape, using SFUD technique, we divided the target into two sub-targets (LLAT beam treating ‘90 degree T-shape’ and RLAT beam treating ‘: shape’) in Plan A and use lateral penumbra gradient matching at patient’s left side. Vice verse inmore » Plan B. Each plan deliver half of the prescription dose. Beam-specific PTVs were created to take range uncertainty and setup error into account. For daily treatment, patient received four fields from both plan A and B per day. Robustness evaluation were performed in the worst case scenario with 3.5% range uncertainty and 1, 2, 3mm overlap or gap between LLAT and RLAT field matching in Raystation 4.0. All of cases also have a Tomotherapy backup plan approved by physician as a dosimetric comparison. Results: The total treatment time take 15–20mins including IGRT and four fields delivery on ProteusONE, a compact size PBS proton system, compared to 25–30min in traditional Tomotherapy. Robustness analysis shows that this plan technique is insensitive to the range uncertainties. With the lateral gradient matching, 1, 2, 3mm overlap renders only 2.5%, 5.5% and 8% hot or cool spot in the junction areas. Dosimetric comparisons with Tomotherapy show a significant dose reduction in bladder D50%(14.7±9.3Gy), D35%(7.3±5.8Gy); small bowel and rectum average dose(19.6±7.5Gy and 14.5±6.3Gy respectively). Conclusion: The bilateral opposed(SFUD) plan with lateral penumbra gradient matching has been approved to be a safe, robust and efficient treatment option for whole pelvis high-risk prostate cancer patient which significantly spares the OARs.« less
  • Purpose: There has been a growing interest in applying collimation to pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy in order to sharpen the lateral dose falloff out of the target, especially at low energies. Currently, there is not a method to optimally determine the collimation position or margin around the target. A uniform margin would not be ideal due to the fact that an incoming symmetric pencil beam, after being intercepted by a collimator near the target boundary, will become asymmetric and experience a lateral shift away from its original spot location, leaving the target insufficiently covered. We demonstrate a methodmore » that optimally determines the collimator position on a per-spot basis, in order to maximize target dose while minimizing normal tissue dose. Methods: A library of collimated pencil beams were obtained through Monte Carlo simulation with a collimator placed at varying distances from the central axis of an incoming symmetrical pencil beam of 118 MeV and 5 mm sigma-in-air. Two-dimensional treatment plans were then created using this library of collimated pencil beams. For each spot position in a treatment plan, the collimator position was optimally determined in such a way that the resultant pencil beam maximized the ratio of in-target dose and out-of-target dose. For comparison, un-collimated treatment plans were also computed. Results: The spot-by-spot optimally determined collimator positions allowed the reduction of normal tissue dose while maintaining the same target coverage as un-collimated PBS. Quantitatively, the mean dose outside of the target was reduced by approximately 40% as compared to the plan without collimation. Conclusion: The proposed method determines the optimal collimator position for each spot in collimated PBS proton therapy. The use of a collimator will improve PBS dose distributions achievable today and will continue to be the subject of future investigations.« less