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Title: Monitoring Tumor Response to Carbogen Breathing by Oxygen-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Parameters to Predict the Outcome of Radiation Therapy: A Preclinical Study

Abstract

Purpose: In an effort to develop noninvasive in vivo methods for mapping tumor oxygenation, magnetic resonance (MR)-derived parameters are being considered, including global R{sub 1}, water R{sub 1}, lipids R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}*. R{sub 1} is sensitive to dissolved molecular oxygen, whereas R{sub 2}* is sensitive to blood oxygenation, detecting changes in dHb. This work compares global R{sub 1}, water R{sub 1}, lipids R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}* with pO{sub 2} assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry, as potential markers of the outcome of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: R{sub 1}, R{sub 2}*, and EPR were performed on rhabdomyosarcoma and 9L-glioma tumor models, under air and carbogen breathing conditions (95% O{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}). Because the models demonstrated different radiosensitivity properties toward carbogen, a growth delay (GD) assay was performed on the rhabdomyosarcoma model and a tumor control dose 50% (TCD50) was performed on the 9L-glioma model. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging oxygen-sensitive parameters detected the positive changes in oxygenation induced by carbogen within tumors. No consistent correlation was seen throughout the study between MR parameters and pO{sub 2}. Global and lipids R{sub 1} were found to be correlated to pO{sub 2} in the rhabdomyosarcoma model, whereas R{submore » 2}* was found to be inversely correlated to pO{sub 2} in the 9L-glioma model (P=.05 and .03). Carbogen increased the TCD50 of 9L-glioma but did not increase the GD of rhabdomyosarcoma. Only R{sub 2}* was predictive (P<.05) for the curability of 9L-glioma at 40 Gy, a dose that showed a difference in response to RT between carbogen and air-breathing groups. {sup 18}F-FAZA positron emission tomography imaging has been shown to be a predictive marker under the same conditions. Conclusion: This work illustrates the sensitivity of oxygen-sensitive R{sub 1} and R{sub 2}* parameters to changes in tumor oxygenation. However, R{sub 1} parameters showed limitations in terms of predicting the outcome of RT in the tumor models studied, whereas R{sub 2}* was found to be correlated with the outcome in the responsive model.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]; ;  [1];  [1]
  1. Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Brussels (Belgium)
  2. Université Catholique de Louvain, IMMAQ Technological Platform, Methodology and Statistical Support, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)
  3. Université Catholique de Louvain, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Research, Center for Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology, Brussels (Belgium)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648792
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 96; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; ELECTRON SPIN RESONANCE; GY RANGE 10-100; IN VIVO; LIPIDS; NMR IMAGING; PARTIAL PRESSURE; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; RADIOSENSITIVITY; RADIOTHERAPY; RESPIRATION; RHABDOMYOSARCOMAS

Citation Formats

Cao-Pham, Thanh-Trang, Tran, Ly-Binh-An, Colliez, Florence, Joudiou, Nicolas, El Bachiri, Sabrina, Grégoire, Vincent, Levêque, Philippe, Gallez, Bernard, and Jordan, Bénédicte F., E-mail: benedicte.jordan@uclouvain.be. Monitoring Tumor Response to Carbogen Breathing by Oxygen-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Parameters to Predict the Outcome of Radiation Therapy: A Preclinical Study. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.04.029.
Cao-Pham, Thanh-Trang, Tran, Ly-Binh-An, Colliez, Florence, Joudiou, Nicolas, El Bachiri, Sabrina, Grégoire, Vincent, Levêque, Philippe, Gallez, Bernard, & Jordan, Bénédicte F., E-mail: benedicte.jordan@uclouvain.be. Monitoring Tumor Response to Carbogen Breathing by Oxygen-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Parameters to Predict the Outcome of Radiation Therapy: A Preclinical Study. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.04.029.
Cao-Pham, Thanh-Trang, Tran, Ly-Binh-An, Colliez, Florence, Joudiou, Nicolas, El Bachiri, Sabrina, Grégoire, Vincent, Levêque, Philippe, Gallez, Bernard, and Jordan, Bénédicte F., E-mail: benedicte.jordan@uclouvain.be. Thu . "Monitoring Tumor Response to Carbogen Breathing by Oxygen-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Parameters to Predict the Outcome of Radiation Therapy: A Preclinical Study". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.04.029.
@article{osti_22648792,
title = {Monitoring Tumor Response to Carbogen Breathing by Oxygen-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Parameters to Predict the Outcome of Radiation Therapy: A Preclinical Study},
author = {Cao-Pham, Thanh-Trang and Tran, Ly-Binh-An and Colliez, Florence and Joudiou, Nicolas and El Bachiri, Sabrina and Grégoire, Vincent and Levêque, Philippe and Gallez, Bernard and Jordan, Bénédicte F., E-mail: benedicte.jordan@uclouvain.be},
abstractNote = {Purpose: In an effort to develop noninvasive in vivo methods for mapping tumor oxygenation, magnetic resonance (MR)-derived parameters are being considered, including global R{sub 1}, water R{sub 1}, lipids R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}*. R{sub 1} is sensitive to dissolved molecular oxygen, whereas R{sub 2}* is sensitive to blood oxygenation, detecting changes in dHb. This work compares global R{sub 1}, water R{sub 1}, lipids R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}* with pO{sub 2} assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry, as potential markers of the outcome of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: R{sub 1}, R{sub 2}*, and EPR were performed on rhabdomyosarcoma and 9L-glioma tumor models, under air and carbogen breathing conditions (95% O{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}). Because the models demonstrated different radiosensitivity properties toward carbogen, a growth delay (GD) assay was performed on the rhabdomyosarcoma model and a tumor control dose 50% (TCD50) was performed on the 9L-glioma model. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging oxygen-sensitive parameters detected the positive changes in oxygenation induced by carbogen within tumors. No consistent correlation was seen throughout the study between MR parameters and pO{sub 2}. Global and lipids R{sub 1} were found to be correlated to pO{sub 2} in the rhabdomyosarcoma model, whereas R{sub 2}* was found to be inversely correlated to pO{sub 2} in the 9L-glioma model (P=.05 and .03). Carbogen increased the TCD50 of 9L-glioma but did not increase the GD of rhabdomyosarcoma. Only R{sub 2}* was predictive (P<.05) for the curability of 9L-glioma at 40 Gy, a dose that showed a difference in response to RT between carbogen and air-breathing groups. {sup 18}F-FAZA positron emission tomography imaging has been shown to be a predictive marker under the same conditions. Conclusion: This work illustrates the sensitivity of oxygen-sensitive R{sub 1} and R{sub 2}* parameters to changes in tumor oxygenation. However, R{sub 1} parameters showed limitations in terms of predicting the outcome of RT in the tumor models studied, whereas R{sub 2}* was found to be correlated with the outcome in the responsive model.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.04.029},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 96,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}