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Title: Spatial Precision in Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Guided Radiation Therapy: The Role of Geometric Distortion

Abstract

Because magnetic resonance imaging–guided radiation therapy (MRIgRT) offers exquisite soft tissue contrast and the ability to image tissues in arbitrary planes, the interest in this technology has increased dramatically in recent years. However, intrinsic geometric distortion stemming from both the system hardware and the magnetic properties of the patient affects MR images and compromises the spatial integrity of MRI-based radiation treatment planning, given that for real-time MRIgRT, precision within 2 mm is desired. In this article, we discuss the causes of geometric distortion, describe some well-known distortion correction algorithms, and review geometric distortion measurements from 12 studies, while taking into account relevant imaging parameters. Eleven of the studies reported phantom measurements quantifying system-dependent geometric distortion, while 2 studies reported simulation data quantifying magnetic susceptibility–induced geometric distortion. Of the 11 studies investigating system-dependent geometric distortion, 5 reported maximum measurements less than 2 mm. The simulation studies demonstrated that magnetic susceptibility–induced distortion is typically smaller than system-dependent distortion but still nonnegligible, with maximum distortion ranging from 2.1 to 2.6 mm at a field strength of 1.5 T. As expected, anatomic landmarks containing interfaces between air and soft tissue had the largest distortions. The evidence indicates that geometric distortion reduces the spatial integrity of MRI-based radiation treatmentmore » planning and likely diminishes the efficacy of MRIgRT. Better phantom measurement techniques and more effective distortion correction algorithms are needed to achieve the desired spatial precision.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [4];  [5];  [4];  [1];  [2];  [6];  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States)
  4. Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)
  5. (Egypt)
  6. Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648750
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 95; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0360-3016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANIMAL TISSUES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; GEOMETRY; IMAGES; MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY; NEOPLASMS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Weygand, Joseph, E-mail: jw2899@columbia.edu, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas, Fuller, Clifton David, Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, Ibbott, Geoffrey S., The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas, Mohamed, Abdallah S.R., Department of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Ding, Yao, Yang, Jinzhong, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas, Hwang, Ken-Pin, Wang, Jihong, and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas. Spatial Precision in Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Guided Radiation Therapy: The Role of Geometric Distortion. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.02.059.
Weygand, Joseph, E-mail: jw2899@columbia.edu, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas, Fuller, Clifton David, Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, Ibbott, Geoffrey S., The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas, Mohamed, Abdallah S.R., Department of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Ding, Yao, Yang, Jinzhong, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas, Hwang, Ken-Pin, Wang, Jihong, & The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas. Spatial Precision in Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Guided Radiation Therapy: The Role of Geometric Distortion. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.02.059.
Weygand, Joseph, E-mail: jw2899@columbia.edu, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas, Fuller, Clifton David, Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, Ibbott, Geoffrey S., The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas, Mohamed, Abdallah S.R., Department of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Ding, Yao, Yang, Jinzhong, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas, Hwang, Ken-Pin, Wang, Jihong, and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas. Fri . "Spatial Precision in Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Guided Radiation Therapy: The Role of Geometric Distortion". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.02.059.
@article{osti_22648750,
title = {Spatial Precision in Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Guided Radiation Therapy: The Role of Geometric Distortion},
author = {Weygand, Joseph, E-mail: jw2899@columbia.edu and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas and Fuller, Clifton David and Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas and Ibbott, Geoffrey S. and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas and Mohamed, Abdallah S.R. and Department of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria and Ding, Yao and Yang, Jinzhong and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas and Hwang, Ken-Pin and Wang, Jihong and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas},
abstractNote = {Because magnetic resonance imaging–guided radiation therapy (MRIgRT) offers exquisite soft tissue contrast and the ability to image tissues in arbitrary planes, the interest in this technology has increased dramatically in recent years. However, intrinsic geometric distortion stemming from both the system hardware and the magnetic properties of the patient affects MR images and compromises the spatial integrity of MRI-based radiation treatment planning, given that for real-time MRIgRT, precision within 2 mm is desired. In this article, we discuss the causes of geometric distortion, describe some well-known distortion correction algorithms, and review geometric distortion measurements from 12 studies, while taking into account relevant imaging parameters. Eleven of the studies reported phantom measurements quantifying system-dependent geometric distortion, while 2 studies reported simulation data quantifying magnetic susceptibility–induced geometric distortion. Of the 11 studies investigating system-dependent geometric distortion, 5 reported maximum measurements less than 2 mm. The simulation studies demonstrated that magnetic susceptibility–induced distortion is typically smaller than system-dependent distortion but still nonnegligible, with maximum distortion ranging from 2.1 to 2.6 mm at a field strength of 1.5 T. As expected, anatomic landmarks containing interfaces between air and soft tissue had the largest distortions. The evidence indicates that geometric distortion reduces the spatial integrity of MRI-based radiation treatment planning and likely diminishes the efficacy of MRIgRT. Better phantom measurement techniques and more effective distortion correction algorithms are needed to achieve the desired spatial precision.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.02.059},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
issn = {0360-3016},
number = 4,
volume = 95,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {7}
}