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Title: Image Guided Radiation Therapy Using Synthetic Computed Tomography Images in Brain Cancer

Abstract

Purpose: The development of synthetic computed tomography (CT) (synCT) derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images supports MR-only treatment planning. We evaluated the accuracy of synCT and synCT-generated digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) relative to CT and determined their performance for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance simulation (MR-SIM) and CT simulation (CT-SIM) images were acquired of an anthropomorphic skull phantom and 12 patient brain cancer cases. SynCTs were generated using fluid attenuation inversion recovery, ultrashort echo time, and Dixon data sets through a voxel-based weighted summation of 5 tissue classifications. The DRRs were generated from the phantom synCT, and geometric fidelity was assessed relative to CT-generated DRRs through bounding box and landmark analysis. An offline retrospective analysis was conducted to register cone beam CTs (n=34) to synCTs and CTs using automated rigid registration in the treatment planning system. Planar MV and KV images (n=37) were rigidly registered to synCT and CT DRRs using an in-house script. Planar and volumetric registration reproducibility was assessed and margin differences were characterized by the van Herk formalism. Results: Bounding box and landmark analysis of phantom synCT DRRs were within 1 mm of CT DRRs. Absolute planar registration shift differences ranged from 0.0more » to 0.7 mm for phantom DRRs on all treatment platforms and from 0.0 to 0.4 mm for volumetric registrations. For patient planar registrations, the mean shift differences were 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.6 to 1.6 mm), 0.0 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.9 to 1.2 mm), and 0.1 ± 0.3 mm (range, −0.7 to 0.6 mm) for the superior-inferior (S-I), left-right (L-R), and anterior-posterior (A-P) axes, respectively. The mean shift differences in volumetric registrations were 0.6 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.2 to 1.6 mm), 0.2 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.3 to 1.2 mm), and 0.2 ± 0.3 mm (range, −0.2 to 1.2 mm) for the S-I, L-R, and A-P axes, respectively. The CT-SIM and synCT derived margins were <0.3 mm different. Conclusion: DRRs generated by synCT were in close agreement with CT-SIM. Planar and volumetric image registrations to synCT-derived targets were comparable with CT for phantom and patients. This validation is the next step toward MR-only planning for the brain.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648747
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 95; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BRAIN; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; IMAGES; MAGNETIC MATERIALS; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PHANTOMS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Price, Ryan G., Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, Kim, Joshua P., Zheng, Weili, Chetty, Indrin J., Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, Glide-Hurst, Carri, E-mail: churst2@hfhs.org, and Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan. Image Guided Radiation Therapy Using Synthetic Computed Tomography Images in Brain Cancer. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.03.002.
Price, Ryan G., Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, Kim, Joshua P., Zheng, Weili, Chetty, Indrin J., Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, Glide-Hurst, Carri, E-mail: churst2@hfhs.org, & Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan. Image Guided Radiation Therapy Using Synthetic Computed Tomography Images in Brain Cancer. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.03.002.
Price, Ryan G., Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, Kim, Joshua P., Zheng, Weili, Chetty, Indrin J., Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, Glide-Hurst, Carri, E-mail: churst2@hfhs.org, and Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan. Fri . "Image Guided Radiation Therapy Using Synthetic Computed Tomography Images in Brain Cancer". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.03.002.
@article{osti_22648747,
title = {Image Guided Radiation Therapy Using Synthetic Computed Tomography Images in Brain Cancer},
author = {Price, Ryan G. and Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan and Kim, Joshua P. and Zheng, Weili and Chetty, Indrin J. and Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan and Glide-Hurst, Carri, E-mail: churst2@hfhs.org and Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The development of synthetic computed tomography (CT) (synCT) derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images supports MR-only treatment planning. We evaluated the accuracy of synCT and synCT-generated digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) relative to CT and determined their performance for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance simulation (MR-SIM) and CT simulation (CT-SIM) images were acquired of an anthropomorphic skull phantom and 12 patient brain cancer cases. SynCTs were generated using fluid attenuation inversion recovery, ultrashort echo time, and Dixon data sets through a voxel-based weighted summation of 5 tissue classifications. The DRRs were generated from the phantom synCT, and geometric fidelity was assessed relative to CT-generated DRRs through bounding box and landmark analysis. An offline retrospective analysis was conducted to register cone beam CTs (n=34) to synCTs and CTs using automated rigid registration in the treatment planning system. Planar MV and KV images (n=37) were rigidly registered to synCT and CT DRRs using an in-house script. Planar and volumetric registration reproducibility was assessed and margin differences were characterized by the van Herk formalism. Results: Bounding box and landmark analysis of phantom synCT DRRs were within 1 mm of CT DRRs. Absolute planar registration shift differences ranged from 0.0 to 0.7 mm for phantom DRRs on all treatment platforms and from 0.0 to 0.4 mm for volumetric registrations. For patient planar registrations, the mean shift differences were 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.6 to 1.6 mm), 0.0 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.9 to 1.2 mm), and 0.1 ± 0.3 mm (range, −0.7 to 0.6 mm) for the superior-inferior (S-I), left-right (L-R), and anterior-posterior (A-P) axes, respectively. The mean shift differences in volumetric registrations were 0.6 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.2 to 1.6 mm), 0.2 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.3 to 1.2 mm), and 0.2 ± 0.3 mm (range, −0.2 to 1.2 mm) for the S-I, L-R, and A-P axes, respectively. The CT-SIM and synCT derived margins were <0.3 mm different. Conclusion: DRRs generated by synCT were in close agreement with CT-SIM. Planar and volumetric image registrations to synCT-derived targets were comparable with CT for phantom and patients. This validation is the next step toward MR-only planning for the brain.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.03.002},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 95,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: Synthetic-CTs(synCTs) are essential for MR-only treatment planning. However, the performance of synCT for IGRT must be carefully assessed. This work evaluated the accuracy of synCT and synCT-generated DRRs and determined their performance for IGRT in brain cancer radiation therapy. Methods: MR-SIM and CT-SIM images were acquired of a novel anthropomorphic phantom and a cohort of 12 patients. SynCTs were generated by combining an ultra-short echo time (UTE) sequence with other MRI datasets using voxel-based weighted summation. For the phantom, DRRs from synCT and CT were compared via bounding box and landmark analysis. Planar (MV/KV) and volumetric (CBCT) IGRT performancemore » were evaluated across several platforms. In patients, retrospective analysis was conducted to register CBCTs (n=34) to synCTs and CTs using automated rigid registration in the treatment planning system using whole brain and local registration techniques. A semi-automatic registration program was developed and validated to rigidly register planar MV/KV images (n=37) to synCT and CT DRRs. Registration reproducibility was assessed and margin differences were characterized using the van Herk formalism. Results: Bounding box and landmark analysis of phantom synCT DRRs were within 1mm of CT DRRs. Absolute 2D/2D registration shift differences ranged from 0.0–0.7mm for phantom DRRs on all treatment platforms and 0.0–0.4mm for volumetric registrations. For patient planar registrations, mean shift differences were 0.4±0.5mm (range: −0.6–1.6mm), 0.0±0.5mm, (range: −0.9–1.2mm), and 0.1±0.3mm (range: −0.7–0.6mm) for the superior-inferior(S-I), left-right(L–R), and anterior-posterior(A-P) axes, respectively. Mean shift differences in volumetric registrations were 0.6±0.4mm (range: −0.2–1.6mm), 0.2±0.4mm (range: −0.3–1.2mm), and 0.2±0.3mm (range: −0.2–1.2mm) for S-I, L–R, and A–P axes, respectively. CT-SIM and synCT derived margins were within 0.3mm. Conclusion: DRRs generated via synCT agreed well with CT-SIM. Planar and volumetric registrations to synCT-derived targets were comparable to CT. This validation is the next step toward clinical implementation of MR-only planning for the brain. The submitting institution has research agreements with Philips Healthcare. Research sponsored by a Henry Ford Health System Internal Mentored Grant.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the image-guidance capabilities of megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT), this article compares the interobserver and intraobserver contouring uncertainty in kilovoltage computed tomography (KVCT) used for radiotherapy planning with MVCT acquired with helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Five prostate-cancer patients were evaluated. Each patient underwent a KVCT and an MVCT study, a total of 10 CT studies. For interobserver variability analysis, four radiation oncologists, one physicist, and two radiation therapists (seven observers in total) contoured the prostate and seminal vesicles (SV) in the 10 studies. The intraobserver variability was assessed by asking all observers to repeat the contouring ofmore » 1 patient's KVCT and MVCT studies. Quantitative analysis of contour variations was performed by use of volumes and radial distances. Results: The interobserver and intraobserver contouring uncertainty was larger in MVCT compared with KVCT. Observers consistently segmented larger volumes on MVCT where the ratio of average prostate and SV volumes was 1.1 and 1.2, respectively. On average (interobserver and intraobserver), the local delineation variability, in terms of standard deviations [{delta}{sigma} = {radical}({sigma}{sup 2} {sub MVCT} - {sigma}{sup 2} {sub KVCT})], increased by 0.32 cm from KVCT to MVCT. Conclusions: Although MVCT was inferior to KVCT for prostate delineation, the application of MVCT in prostate radiotherapy remains useful.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate a novel four-dimensional (4D) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) technique in stereotactic body RT for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: For 11 patients with 13 intrahepatic tumors, a respiratory-correlated 4D computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired at treatment planning. The target was defined using CT series reconstructed at end-inhalation and end-exhalation. The liver was delineated on these two CT series and served as a reference for image guidance. A cone-beam CT scan was acquired after patient positioning; the blurred diaphragm dome was interpreted as a probability density function showing the motion range of the liver. Manual contour matching ofmore » the liver structures from the planning 4D CT scan with the cone-beam CT scan was performed. Inter- and intrafractional uncertainties of target position and motion range were evaluated, and interobserver variability of the 4D-IGRT technique was tested. Results: The workflow of 4D-IGRT was successfully practiced in all patients. The absolute error in the liver position and error in relation to the bony anatomy was 8 {+-} 4 mm and 5 {+-} 2 mm (three-dimensional vector), respectively. Margins of 4-6 mm were calculated for compensation of the intrafractional drifts of the liver. The motion range of the diaphragm dome was reproducible within 5 mm for 11 of 13 lesions, and the interobserver variability of the 4D-IGRT technique was small (standard deviation, 1.5 mm). In 4 patients, the position of the intrahepatic lesion was directly verified using a mobile in-room CT scanner after application of intravenous contrast. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that 4D image guidance using liver contour matching between respiratory-correlated CT and cone-beam CT scans increased the accuracy compared with stereotactic positioning and compared with IGRT without consideration of breathing motion.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate CT number (CTN) changes in gross tumor volume (GTV) and organ at risk (OAR) according to daily diagnostic-quality CT acquired during CT-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography scans acquired using a CT-on-rails during daily CT-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for 15 patients with stage II to IVa squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were analyzed. The GTV, parotid glands, spinal cord, and nonspecified tissue were generated on each selected daily CT. The changes in CTN distributions and the mean and mode values were collected.more » Pearson analysis was used to assess the correlation between the CTN change, organ volume reduction, and delivered radiation dose. Results: Volume and CTN changes for GTV and parotid glands can be observed during radiation therapy delivery for HNC. The mean (±SD) CTNs in GTV and ipsi- and contralateral parotid glands were reduced by 6 ± 10, 8 ± 7, and 11 ± 10 Hounsfield units, respectively, for all patients studied. The mean CTN changes in both spinal cord and nonspecified tissue were almost invisible (<2 Hounsfield units). For 2 patients studied, the absolute mean CTN changes in GTV and parotid glands were strongly correlated with the dose delivered (P<.001 and P<.05, respectively). For the correlation between CTN reductions and delivered isodose bins for parotid glands, the Pearson coefficient varied from −0.98 (P<.001) in regions with low-dose bins to 0.96 (P<.001) in high-dose bins and were patient specific. Conclusions: The CTN can be reduced in tumor and parotid glands during the course of radiation therapy for HNC. There was a fair correlation between CTN reduction and radiation doses for a subset of patients, whereas the correlation between CTN reductions and volume reductions in GTV and parotid glands were weak. More studies are needed to understand the mechanism for the radiation-induced CTN changes.« less
  • Purpose: Various image guidance systems are commonly used in conjunction with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in head-and-neck cancer irradiation. The purpose of this study was to assess interfraction patient setup variations for 3 computed tomography (CT)-based on-board image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) modalities. Methods and Materials: A total of 3302 CT scans for 117 patients, including 53 patients receiving megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT), 29 receiving kilovoltage cone-beam CT (KVCBCT), and 35 receiving megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVFBCT), were retrospectively analyzed. The daily variations in the mediolateral (ML), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) dimensions were measured. The clinical target volume-to-planned targetmore » volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins were calculated using 2.5Σ + 0.7 σ, where Σ and σ were systematic and random positioning errors, respectively. Various patient characteristics for the MVCBCT group, including weight, weight loss, tumor location, and initial body mass index, were analyzed to determine their possible correlation with daily patient setup. Results: The average interfraction displacements (± standard deviation) in the ML, CC, and AP directions were 0.5 ± 1.5, −0.3 ± 2.0, and 0.3 ± 1.7 mm (KVCBCT); 0.2 ± 1.9, −0.2 ± 2.4, and 0.0 ± 1.7 mm (MVFBCT); and 0.0 ± 1.8, 0.5 ± 1.7, and 0.8 ± 3.0 mm (MVCBCT). The day-to-day random errors for KVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT were 1.4-1.6, 1.7, and 2.0-2.1 mm. The interobserver variations were 0.8, 1.1, and 0.7 mm (MVCBCT); 0.5, 0.4, and 0.8 mm (MVFBCT); and 0.5, 0.4, and 0.6 mm (KVCBCT) in the ML, CC, and AP directions, respectively. The maximal calculated uniform CTV-to-PTV margins were 5.6, 6.9, and 8.9 mm for KVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT, respectively. For the evaluated patient characteristics, the calculated margins for different patient parameters appeared to differ; analysis of variance (ANOVA) and/or t test analysis found no statistically significant setup difference in any direction. Conclusions: Daily random setup errors and CTV-to-PTV margins for treatment of head-and-neck cancer were affected by imaging quality. Our data indicated that larger margins were associated with MVFBCT and MVCBCT, compared with smaller margins for KVCBCT. IGRT modalities with better image quality are encouraged in clinical practice.« less