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Title: Single-Fraction Versus Multifraction (3 × 9 Gy) Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Large (>2 cm) Brain Metastases: A Comparative Analysis of Local Control and Risk of Radiation-Induced Brain Necrosis

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the local control and radiation-induced brain necrosis in patients with brain metastases >2 cm in size who received single-fraction or multifraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS); factors associated with clinical outcomes and the development of brain radionecrosis were assessed. Methods and Materials: Two hundred eighty-nine consecutive patients with brain metastases >2.0 cm who received SRS as primary treatment at Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome Sapienza, Rome, Italy, were analyzed. Cumulative incidence analysis was used to compare local control and radiation-induced brain necrosis between groups from the time of SRS. To achieve a balanced distribution of baseline covariates between treatment groups, a propensity score analysis was used. Results: The 1-year cumulative local control rates were 77% in the single-fraction SRS (SF-SRS) group and 91% in the multifraction SRS (MF-SRS) group (P=.01). Recurrences occurred in 25 and 11 patients who received SF-SRS or MF-SRS (P=.03), respectively. Thirty-one patients (20%) undergoing SF-SRS and 11 (8%) subjected to MF-SRS experienced brain radionecrosis (P=.004); the 1-year cumulative incidence rate of radionecrosis was 18% and 9% (P=.01), respectively. Significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of local control and risk of radionecrosis were maintained after propensity score adjustment. Conclusions: Multifraction SRS at a dose of 27 Gymore » in 3 daily fractions seems to be an effective treatment modality for large brain metastases, associated with better local control and a reduced risk of radiation-induced radionecrosis as compared with SF-SRS.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]; ;  [3];  [4];  [5]; ;  [1];  [3]
  1. Unit of Radiation Oncology, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome (Italy)
  2. (Italy)
  3. IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy)
  4. Unit of Neuroradiology, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome (Italy)
  5. Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648729
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 95; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BRAIN; GY RANGE 01-10; GY RANGE 10-100; ITALY; NECROSIS; PATIENTS; RADIATION HAZARDS; RADIOTHERAPY; SURGERY

Citation Formats

Minniti, Giuseppe, E-mail: gminniti@ospedalesantandrea.it, IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, Scaringi, Claudia, Paolini, Sergio, Lanzetta, Gaetano, Romano, Andrea, Cicone, Francesco, Osti, Mattia, Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi, and Esposito, Vincenzo. Single-Fraction Versus Multifraction (3 × 9 Gy) Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Large (>2 cm) Brain Metastases: A Comparative Analysis of Local Control and Risk of Radiation-Induced Brain Necrosis. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.03.013.
Minniti, Giuseppe, E-mail: gminniti@ospedalesantandrea.it, IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, Scaringi, Claudia, Paolini, Sergio, Lanzetta, Gaetano, Romano, Andrea, Cicone, Francesco, Osti, Mattia, Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi, & Esposito, Vincenzo. Single-Fraction Versus Multifraction (3 × 9 Gy) Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Large (>2 cm) Brain Metastases: A Comparative Analysis of Local Control and Risk of Radiation-Induced Brain Necrosis. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.03.013.
Minniti, Giuseppe, E-mail: gminniti@ospedalesantandrea.it, IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, Scaringi, Claudia, Paolini, Sergio, Lanzetta, Gaetano, Romano, Andrea, Cicone, Francesco, Osti, Mattia, Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi, and Esposito, Vincenzo. 2016. "Single-Fraction Versus Multifraction (3 × 9 Gy) Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Large (>2 cm) Brain Metastases: A Comparative Analysis of Local Control and Risk of Radiation-Induced Brain Necrosis". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.03.013.
@article{osti_22648729,
title = {Single-Fraction Versus Multifraction (3 × 9 Gy) Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Large (>2 cm) Brain Metastases: A Comparative Analysis of Local Control and Risk of Radiation-Induced Brain Necrosis},
author = {Minniti, Giuseppe, E-mail: gminniti@ospedalesantandrea.it and IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli and Scaringi, Claudia and Paolini, Sergio and Lanzetta, Gaetano and Romano, Andrea and Cicone, Francesco and Osti, Mattia and Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi and Esposito, Vincenzo},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate the local control and radiation-induced brain necrosis in patients with brain metastases >2 cm in size who received single-fraction or multifraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS); factors associated with clinical outcomes and the development of brain radionecrosis were assessed. Methods and Materials: Two hundred eighty-nine consecutive patients with brain metastases >2.0 cm who received SRS as primary treatment at Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome Sapienza, Rome, Italy, were analyzed. Cumulative incidence analysis was used to compare local control and radiation-induced brain necrosis between groups from the time of SRS. To achieve a balanced distribution of baseline covariates between treatment groups, a propensity score analysis was used. Results: The 1-year cumulative local control rates were 77% in the single-fraction SRS (SF-SRS) group and 91% in the multifraction SRS (MF-SRS) group (P=.01). Recurrences occurred in 25 and 11 patients who received SF-SRS or MF-SRS (P=.03), respectively. Thirty-one patients (20%) undergoing SF-SRS and 11 (8%) subjected to MF-SRS experienced brain radionecrosis (P=.004); the 1-year cumulative incidence rate of radionecrosis was 18% and 9% (P=.01), respectively. Significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of local control and risk of radionecrosis were maintained after propensity score adjustment. Conclusions: Multifraction SRS at a dose of 27 Gy in 3 daily fractions seems to be an effective treatment modality for large brain metastases, associated with better local control and a reduced risk of radiation-induced radionecrosis as compared with SF-SRS.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.03.013},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 95,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9508 showed a survival advantage for patients with 1 but not 2 or 3 brain metastasis (BM) treated with whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) versus WBRT alone. An improved prognostic index, the graded prognostic assessment (GPA) has been developed. Our hypothesis was that if the data from RTOG 9508 were poststratified by the GPA, the conclusions may vary. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 252 of the 331 patients were evaluable by GPA. Of those, 211 had lung cancer. Breast cancer patients were excluded because the components of the breast GPAmore » are not in the RTOG database. Multiple Cox regression was used to compare survival between treatment groups, adjusting for GPA. Treatment comparisons within subgroups were performed with the log-rank test. A free online tool ( (brainmetgpa.com)) simplified GPA use. Results: The fundamental conclusions of the primary analysis were confirmed in that there was no survival benefit overall for patients with 1 to 3 metastases; however, there was a benefit for the subset of patients with GPA 3.5 to 4.0 (median survival time [MST] for WBRT + SRS vs WBRT alone was 21.0 versus 10.3 months, P=.05) regardless of the number of metastases. Among patients with GPA 3.5 to 4.0 treated with WBRT and SRS, the MST for patients with 1 versus 2 to 3 metastases was 21 and 14.1 months, respectively. Conclusions: This secondary analysis of predominantly lung cancer patients, consistent with the original analysis, shows no survival advantage for the group overall when treated with WBRT and SRS; however, in patients with high GPA (3.5-4), there is a survival advantage regardless of whether they have 1, 2, or 3 BM. This benefit did not extend to patients with lower GPA. Prospective validation of this survival benefit for patients with multiple BM and high GPA when treated with WBRT and SRS is warranted.« less
  • Purpose: To compare the results of whole-brain radiotherapy plus stereotactic radiosurgery (WBRT+SRS) with those of surgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy and a boost to the metastatic site (OP+WBRT+boost) for patients with one or two brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Survival, intracerebral control, and local control of the treated metastases were retrospectively evaluated. To reduce the risk of selection bias, a matched-pair analysis was performed. The outcomes of 47 patients who received WBRT+SRS were compared with those of a second cohort of 47 patients who received OP+WBRT+boost. The two treatment groups were matched for the following potential prognostic factors: WBRT schedule, age,more » gender, performance status, tumor type, number of brain metastases, extracerebral metastases, recursive partitioning analysis class, and interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT. Results: The 1-year survival rates were 65% after WBRT+SRS and 63% after OP+WBRT+boost (p = 0.19). The 1-year intracerebral control rates were 70% and 78% (p = 0.39), respectively. The 1-year local control rates were 84% and 83% (p = 0.87), respectively. On multivariate analyses, improved survival was significantly associated with better performance status (p = 0.009), no extracerebral metastases (p = 0.004), recursive partitioning analysis Class 1 (p = 0.004), and interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT (p = 0.001). Intracerebral control was not significantly associated with any of the potential prognostic factors. Improved local control was significantly associated with no extracerebral metastases (p = 0.037). Conclusions: Treatment outcomes were not significantly different after WBRT+SRS compared with OP+WBRT+boost. However, WBRT+SRS is less invasive than OP+WBRT+boost and may be preferable for patients with one or two brain metastases. The results should be confirmed by randomized t0011ria.« less
  • Background: A phase 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) study subset analysis demonstrated improved overall survival (OS) with the addition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases. Because temozolomide (TMZ) and erlotinib (ETN) cross the blood-brain barrier and have documented activity in NSCLC, a phase 3 study was designed to test whether these drugs would improve the OS associated with WBRT + SRS. Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases were randomized to receive WBRT (2.5 Gy × 15 tomore » 37.5 Gy) and SRS alone, versus WBRT + SRS + TMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 21 days) or ETN (150 mg/day). ETN (150 mg/day) or TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 5 days/month) could be continued for as long as 6 months after WBRT + SRS. The primary endpoint was OS. Results: After 126 patients were enrolled, the study closed because of accrual limitations. The median survival times (MST) for WBRT + SRS, WBRT + SRS + TMZ, and WBRT + SRS + ETN were qualitatively different (13.4, 6.3, and 6.1 months, respectively), although the differences were not statistically significant. Time to central nervous system progression and performance status at 6 months were better in the WBRT + SRS arm. Grade 3 to 5 toxicity was 11%, 41%, and 49% in arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<.001). Conclusion: The addition of TMZ or ETN to WBRT + SRS in NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases did not improve survival and possibly had a deleterious effect. Because the analysis is underpowered, these data suggest but do not prove that increased toxicity was the cause of inferior survival in the drug arms.« less
  • Purpose: Although whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is effective for controlling intracranial disease, it is also associated with neurocognitive side effects. It is unclear whether a theoretically improved quality of life after stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) alone relative to that after SRS with adjuvant WBRT would justify the omission of WBRT, given the higher risk of intracranial failure. This study compares SRS alone with SRS and WBRT, to evaluate the theoretical benefits of intracranial tumor control with adjuvant WBRT against its possible side effects, using quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE) as a primary endpoint. Methods and Materials: A Markov decision analysis modelmore » was used to compare QALE in a cohort of patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases and Karnofsky performance status of at least 70. Patients were treated with SRS alone or with SRS immediately followed by WBRT. Patients treated with SRS alone underwent surveillance magnetic resonance imaging and received salvage WBRT if they developed intracranial relapse. All patients whose cancer relapsed after WBRT underwent simulation as dying of intracranial progression. Model parameters were estimated from published literature. Results: Treatment with SRS yielded 6.2 quality-adjusted life months (QALMs). The addition of initial WBRT reduced QALE by 1.2 QALMs. On one-way sensitivity analysis, the model was sensitive only to a single parameter, the utility associated with the state of no evidence of disease after SRS alone. At values greater than 0.51, SRS alone was preferred. Conclusions: In general, SRS alone is suggested to have improved quality of life in patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases compared to SRS and immediate WBRT. Our results suggest that immediate treatment with WBRT after SRS can be reserved for patients who would have a poor performance status regardless of treatment. These findings are stable under a wide range of assumptions.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prophylactic effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy for radiation-induced brain injury in patients with brain metastasis treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: The data of 78 patients presenting with 101 brain metastases treated with SRS between October 1994 and September 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 32 patients with 47 brain metastases were treated with prophylactic HBO (HBO group), which included all 21 patients who underwent subsequent or prior radiotherapy and 11 patients with common predictors of longer survival, such as inactive extracranial tumors and youngermore » age. The other 46 patients with 54 brain metastases did not undergo HBO (non-HBO group). Radiation-induced brain injuries were divided into two categories, white matter injury (WMI) and radiation necrosis (RN), on the basis of imaging findings. Results: Radiation-induced brain injury occurred in 5 lesions (11%) in the HBO group (2 WMIs and 3 RNs) and in 11 (20%) in the non-HBO group (9 WMIs and 2 RNs). The WMI was less frequent for the HBO group than for the non-HBO group (p = 0.05), although multivariate analysis by logistic regression showed that WMI was not significantly correlated with HBO (p = 0.07). The 1-year actuarial probability of WMI was significantly better for the HBO group (2%) than for the non-HBO group (36%) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The present study showed a potential value of prophylactic HBO for Radiation-induced WMIs, which justifies further evaluation to confirm its definite benefit.« less