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Title: Factors Affecting Gender-based Experiences for Residents in Radiation Oncology

Abstract

Purpose: Although women constitute approximately half of medical school graduates, an uneven gender distribution exists among many specialties, including radiation oncology, where women fill only one third of residency positions. Although multiple social and societal factors have been theorized, a structured review of radiation oncology resident experiences has yet to be performed. Methods and Materials: An anonymous and voluntary survey was sent to 611 radiation oncology residents practicing in the United States. Residents were asked about their gender-based experiences in terms of mentorship, their professional and learning environment, and their partnerships and personal life. Results: A total of 203 participants submitted completed survey responses. Fifty-seven percent of respondents were men, and 43% were women, with a mean age of 31 years (standard deviation=3.7 years). Although residents in general value having a mentor, female residents prefer mentors of the same gender (P<.001), and noted having more difficulty finding a mentor (P=.042). Women were more likely to say that they have observed preferential treatment based on gender (P≤.001), and they were more likely to perceive gender-specific biases or obstacles in their professional and learning environment (P<.001). Women selected residency programs based on gender ratios (P<.001), and female residents preferred to see equal numbers ofmore » male and female faculty (P<.001). Women were also more likely to perceive work-related strain than their male counterparts (P<.001). Conclusions: Differences in experiences for male and female radiation oncology residents exist with regard to mentorship and in their professional and learning environment.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville, School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky (United States)
  2. Department of Graduate Medical Education, University of Louisville, School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky (United States)
  3. Departments of Women's and Gender Studies and Sociology, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Massachusetts (United States)
  4. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648714
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 95; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; LEARNING; RADIOLOGICAL PERSONNEL; RADIOTHERAPY; SEX DEPENDENCE

Citation Formats

Barry, Parul N., E-mail: pnbarr01@louisville.edu, Miller, Karen H., Ziegler, Craig, Hertz, Rosanna, Hanna, Nevine, and Dragun, Anthony E. Factors Affecting Gender-based Experiences for Residents in Radiation Oncology. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.02.007.
Barry, Parul N., E-mail: pnbarr01@louisville.edu, Miller, Karen H., Ziegler, Craig, Hertz, Rosanna, Hanna, Nevine, & Dragun, Anthony E. Factors Affecting Gender-based Experiences for Residents in Radiation Oncology. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.02.007.
Barry, Parul N., E-mail: pnbarr01@louisville.edu, Miller, Karen H., Ziegler, Craig, Hertz, Rosanna, Hanna, Nevine, and Dragun, Anthony E. Fri . "Factors Affecting Gender-based Experiences for Residents in Radiation Oncology". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.02.007.
@article{osti_22648714,
title = {Factors Affecting Gender-based Experiences for Residents in Radiation Oncology},
author = {Barry, Parul N., E-mail: pnbarr01@louisville.edu and Miller, Karen H. and Ziegler, Craig and Hertz, Rosanna and Hanna, Nevine and Dragun, Anthony E.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Although women constitute approximately half of medical school graduates, an uneven gender distribution exists among many specialties, including radiation oncology, where women fill only one third of residency positions. Although multiple social and societal factors have been theorized, a structured review of radiation oncology resident experiences has yet to be performed. Methods and Materials: An anonymous and voluntary survey was sent to 611 radiation oncology residents practicing in the United States. Residents were asked about their gender-based experiences in terms of mentorship, their professional and learning environment, and their partnerships and personal life. Results: A total of 203 participants submitted completed survey responses. Fifty-seven percent of respondents were men, and 43% were women, with a mean age of 31 years (standard deviation=3.7 years). Although residents in general value having a mentor, female residents prefer mentors of the same gender (P<.001), and noted having more difficulty finding a mentor (P=.042). Women were more likely to say that they have observed preferential treatment based on gender (P≤.001), and they were more likely to perceive gender-specific biases or obstacles in their professional and learning environment (P<.001). Women selected residency programs based on gender ratios (P<.001), and female residents preferred to see equal numbers of male and female faculty (P<.001). Women were also more likely to perceive work-related strain than their male counterparts (P<.001). Conclusions: Differences in experiences for male and female radiation oncology residents exist with regard to mentorship and in their professional and learning environment.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.02.007},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 95,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}