skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Comparison of Planning Quality and Efficiency Between Conventional and Knowledge-based Algorithms in Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

Abstract

Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is widely used to achieve a highly conformal dose and improve treatment outcome. However, plan quality and planning time are institute and planner dependent, and no standardized tool exists to recognize an optimal plan. RapidPlan, a knowledge-based algorithm, can generate constraints to assist optimization and produce high-quality IMRT plans. This report evaluated the quality and efficiency of using RapidPlan in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) IMRT planning. Methods and Materials: RapidPlan was configured using 79 radical IMRT plans for NPC; 20 consecutive NPC patients indicated for radical radiation therapy between October 2014 and May 2015 were then recruited to assess its performance. The ability of RapidPlan to produce acceptable plans was evaluated. For plans that could not achieve clinical acceptance, manual touch-up was performed. The IMRT plans produced without RapidPlan (manual plans) and with RapidPlan (RP-2 plans, including those with manual touch-up) were compared in terms of dosimetric quality and planning efficiency. Results: RapidPlan by itself could produce clinically acceptable plans for 9 of the 20 patients; manual touch-up increased the number of acceptable plans (RP-2 plans) to 19. The target dose coverage and conformity were very similar. No difference was found in the maximum dosemore » to the brainstem and optic chiasm. RP-2 plans delivered a higher maximum dose to the spinal cord (46.4 Gy vs 43.9 Gy, P=.002) but a lower dose to the parotid (mean dose to right parotid, 37.3 Gy vs 45.4 Gy; left, 34.4 Gy vs 43.1 Gy; P<.001) and the right cochlea (mean dose, 48.6 Gy vs 52.6 Gy; P=.02). The total planning time for RP-2 plans was significantly less than that for manual plans (64 minutes vs 295 minutes, P<.001). Conclusions: This study shows that RapidPlan can significantly improve planning efficiency and produce quality IMRT plans for NPC patients.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ;  [2];  [1]; ;  [3];  [1]
  1. Department of Clinical Oncology, Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital (Hong Kong)
  2. Department of Medical Physics, Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital (Hong Kong)
  3. Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22648711
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 95; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; GY RANGE 10-100; MANUALS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SPINAL CORD

Citation Formats

Chang, Amy T.Y., E-mail: changty@ha.org.hk, Hung, Albert W.M., Cheung, Fion W.K., Lee, Michael C.H., Chan, Oscar S.H., Philips, Helen, Cheng, Yung-Tang, and Ng, Wai-Tong. Comparison of Planning Quality and Efficiency Between Conventional and Knowledge-based Algorithms in Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.02.017.
Chang, Amy T.Y., E-mail: changty@ha.org.hk, Hung, Albert W.M., Cheung, Fion W.K., Lee, Michael C.H., Chan, Oscar S.H., Philips, Helen, Cheng, Yung-Tang, & Ng, Wai-Tong. Comparison of Planning Quality and Efficiency Between Conventional and Knowledge-based Algorithms in Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.02.017.
Chang, Amy T.Y., E-mail: changty@ha.org.hk, Hung, Albert W.M., Cheung, Fion W.K., Lee, Michael C.H., Chan, Oscar S.H., Philips, Helen, Cheng, Yung-Tang, and Ng, Wai-Tong. 2016. "Comparison of Planning Quality and Efficiency Between Conventional and Knowledge-based Algorithms in Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.02.017.
@article{osti_22648711,
title = {Comparison of Planning Quality and Efficiency Between Conventional and Knowledge-based Algorithms in Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy},
author = {Chang, Amy T.Y., E-mail: changty@ha.org.hk and Hung, Albert W.M. and Cheung, Fion W.K. and Lee, Michael C.H. and Chan, Oscar S.H. and Philips, Helen and Cheng, Yung-Tang and Ng, Wai-Tong},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is widely used to achieve a highly conformal dose and improve treatment outcome. However, plan quality and planning time are institute and planner dependent, and no standardized tool exists to recognize an optimal plan. RapidPlan, a knowledge-based algorithm, can generate constraints to assist optimization and produce high-quality IMRT plans. This report evaluated the quality and efficiency of using RapidPlan in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) IMRT planning. Methods and Materials: RapidPlan was configured using 79 radical IMRT plans for NPC; 20 consecutive NPC patients indicated for radical radiation therapy between October 2014 and May 2015 were then recruited to assess its performance. The ability of RapidPlan to produce acceptable plans was evaluated. For plans that could not achieve clinical acceptance, manual touch-up was performed. The IMRT plans produced without RapidPlan (manual plans) and with RapidPlan (RP-2 plans, including those with manual touch-up) were compared in terms of dosimetric quality and planning efficiency. Results: RapidPlan by itself could produce clinically acceptable plans for 9 of the 20 patients; manual touch-up increased the number of acceptable plans (RP-2 plans) to 19. The target dose coverage and conformity were very similar. No difference was found in the maximum dose to the brainstem and optic chiasm. RP-2 plans delivered a higher maximum dose to the spinal cord (46.4 Gy vs 43.9 Gy, P=.002) but a lower dose to the parotid (mean dose to right parotid, 37.3 Gy vs 45.4 Gy; left, 34.4 Gy vs 43.1 Gy; P<.001) and the right cochlea (mean dose, 48.6 Gy vs 52.6 Gy; P=.02). The total planning time for RP-2 plans was significantly less than that for manual plans (64 minutes vs 295 minutes, P<.001). Conclusions: This study shows that RapidPlan can significantly improve planning efficiency and produce quality IMRT plans for NPC patients.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.02.017},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 95,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning can have wide variation among different treatment centers. We propose a system to leverage the IMRT planning experience of larger institutions to automatically create high-quality plans for outside clinics. We explore feasibility by generating plans for patient datasets from an outside institution by adapting plans from our institution. Methods and Materials: A knowledge database was created from 132 IMRT treatment plans for prostate cancer at our institution. The outside institution, a community hospital, provided the datasets for 55 prostate cancer cases, including their original treatment plans. For each “query” case from themore » outside institution, a similar “match” case was identified in the knowledge database, and the match case’s plan parameters were then adapted and optimized to the query case by use of a semiautomated approach that required no expert planning knowledge. The plans generated with this knowledge-based approach were compared with the original treatment plans at several dose cutpoints. Results: Compared with the original plan, the knowledge-based plan had a significantly more homogeneous dose to the planning target volume and a significantly lower maximum dose. The volumes of the rectum, bladder, and femoral heads above all cutpoints were nominally lower for the knowledge-based plan; the reductions were significantly lower for the rectum. In 40% of cases, the knowledge-based plan had overall superior (lower) dose–volume histograms for rectum and bladder; in 54% of cases, the comparison was equivocal; in 6% of cases, the knowledge-based plan was inferior for both bladder and rectum. Conclusions: Knowledge-based planning was superior or equivalent to the original plan in 95% of cases. The knowledge-based approach shows promise for homogenizing plan quality by transferring planning expertise from more experienced to less experienced institutions.« less
  • The aim of this study is to evaluate the deficiencies in target coverage and organ protection of 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2DRT) in the treatment of advanced T-stage (T3-4) nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and assess the extent of improvement that could be achieved with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), with special reference to of the dose to the planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) of the brainstem and spinal cord. A dosimetric study was performed on 10 patients with advanced T-stage (T3-4 and N0-2) NPC. Computer tomography (CT) images of 2.5-mm slice thickness of the head and neck were acquired with the patient immobilizedmore » in semi-extended-head position. A 2D plan based on Ho's technique, and an IMRT plan based on a 7-coplanar portals arrangement, were established for each patient. 2DRT was planned with the field borders and shielding drawn on the simulator radiograph with reference to bony landmarks, digitized, and entered into a planning computer for reconstruction of the 3D dose distribution. The 2DRT and IMRT treatment plans were evaluated and compared with respect to the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the targets and the organs-at-risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs). With IMRT, the dose coverage of the target was superior to that of 2DRT. The mean minimum dose of the GTV and PTV were increased from 33.7 Gy (2DRT) to 62.6 Gy (IMRT), and 11.9 Gy (2DRT) to 47.8 Gy (IMRT), respectively. The D{sub 95} of the GTV and PTV were also increased from 57.1 Gy (2DRT) to 67 Gy (IMRT), and 45 Gy (2DRT) to 63.6 Gy (IMRT), respectively. The TCP was substantially increased to 78.5% in IMRT. Better protection of the critical normal organs was also achieved with IMRT. The mean maximum dose delivered to the brainstem and spinal cord were reduced significantly from 61.8 Gy (2DRT) to 52.8 Gy (IMRT) and 56 Gy (2DRT) to 43.6 Gy (IMRT), respectively, which were within the conventional dose limits of 54 Gy for brainstem and of 45 Gy for spinal cord. The mean maximum doses deposited on the PRV of the brainstem and spinal cord were 60.7 Gy and 51.6 Gy respectively, which were above the conventional dose limits. For the chiasm, the mean dose maximum and the dose to 5% of its volume were reduced from 64.3 Gy (2DRT) to 53.7 Gy (IMRT) and from 62.8 Gy (2DRT) to 48.7 Gy (IMRT), respectively, and the corresponding NTCP was reduced from 18.4% to 2.1%. For the temporal lobes, the mean dose to 10% of its volume (about 4.6 cc) was reduced from 63.8 Gy (2DRT) to 55.4 Gy (IMRT) and the NTCP was decreased from 11.7% to 3.4%. The therapeutic ratio for T3-4 NPC tumors can be significantly improved with IMRT treatment technique due to improvement both in target coverage and the sparing of the critical normal organ. Although the maximum doses delivered to the brainstem and spinal cord in IMRT can be kept at or below their conventional dose limits, the maximum doses deposited on the PRV often exceed these limits due to the close proximity between the target and OARs. In other words, ideal dosimetric considerations cannot be fulfilled in IMRT planning for T3-4 NPC tumors. A compromise of the maximal dose limit to the PRV of the brainstem and spinal cord would need be accepted if dose coverage to the targets is not to be unacceptably compromised. Dosimetric comparison with 2DRT plans show that these dose limits to PRV were also frequently exceeded in 2DRT plans for locally advanced NPC. A dedicated retrospective study on the incidence of clinical injury to neurological organs in a large series of patients with T3-4 NPC treated by 2DRT may provide useful reference data in exploring how far the PRV dose constraints may be relaxed, to maximize the target coverage without compromising the normal organ function.« less
  • Purpose: To compare and analyze the characteristics of intensity-modulated arc therapy(IMAT) versus fixed-gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) in treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods: Twelve patients treated in our radiotherapy center were selected for this study. The patient subsequently underwent 4D-CT simulation.Margins of 5mm and 10mm were added to the ITV to generate the CTV and PTV respectively. Three treatment plans (IMRT,one single arc (RA1),double arcs (RA2))were generated with Eclipse ver.8.6 planning systems. Using a dose level of 75Gy in 15fractions to the ITV,60Gy in 15fractions to the CTV and 45Gy in 15fractions to the PTV respectively. The target and normol tissuemore » volumes were compared,as were the dosimetry parameters. Results: There were no significant differences in CI of ITV,PTV,HI of ITV,CTV and PTV, V5,V10,V15,V20,V25,V30,V45,V50 of total-lung and mean lung dose (all p>0.05). However, the differences were significant in terms of CI of CTV,V5 of B-P (all p<0.05). On the MU, IMRT=1540MU,RA1=1006 MU and RA2=1096 MU. (F=12.00,P=0.000).On the treatment time, IMRT= 13.5min,RA1= 1.5min,and RA2=2.5 min (F= 30.11,P=0.000 ). Conclusion: IMAT is equal to IMRT in dosimetril evaluation. Due to much less Mu and delivery time,IMAT is an ideal technique in treating patients by reduceing the uncomfortable influnce which could effect the treatment.« less
  • The primary aim of this study is to compare intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the radical treatment of prostate cancer using version 10.0 (v10.0) of Varian Medical Systems, RapidArc radiation oncology system. Particular focus was placed on plan quality and the implications on departmental resources. The secondary objective was to compare the results in v10.0 to the preceding version 8.6 (v8.6). Twenty prostate cancer cases were retrospectively planned using v10.0 of Varian's Eclipse and RapidArc software. Three planning techniques were performed: a 5-field IMRT, VMAT using one arc (VMAT-1A), and VMAT with twomore » arcs (VMAT-2A). Plan quality was assessed by examining homogeneity, conformity, the number of monitor units (MUs) utilized, and dose to the organs at risk (OAR). Resource implications were assessed by examining planning and treatment times. The results obtained using v10.0 were also compared to those previously reported by our group for v8.6. In v10.0, each technique was able to produce a dose distribution that achieved the departmental planning guidelines. The IMRT plans were produced faster than VMAT plans and displayed improved homogeneity. The VMAT plans provided better conformity to the target volume, improved dose to the OAR, and required fewer MUs. Treatments using VMAT-1A were significantly faster than both IMRT and VMAT-2A. Comparison between versions 8.6 and 10.0 revealed that in the newer version, VMAT planning was significantly faster and the quality of the VMAT dose distributions produced were of a better quality. VMAT (v10.0) using one or two arcs provides an acceptable alternative to IMRT for the treatment of prostate cancer. VMAT-1A has the greatest impact on reducing treatment time.« less
  • Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference of the target volume and organs at risk(OARs) between conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy(C-IMRT) and knowledge-based radiation therapy (KBRT) plans for cervix cancer. Methods: 39 patients with cervical cancer after surgery were randomly selected, 20 patient plans were used to create the model, the other 19 cases used for comparative evaluation. All plans were designed in Eclipse system. The prescription dose was 30.6Gy, 17 fractions, OARs dose satisfied to the clinical requirement. A paired t test was used to evaluate the differences of dose-volume histograms (DVH). Results: Comparaed to C-IMRT plan, the KBRT plan target canmore » achieve the similar target dose coverage, D98,D95,D2,HI and CI had no difference (P≥0.05). The dose of rectum, bladder and femoral heads had no significant differences(P≥0.05). The time was used to design treatment plan was significant reduced. Conclusion: This study shows that postoperative radiotherapy of cervical KBRT plans can achieve the similar target and OARs dose, but the shorter designing time.« less