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Title: Oxygen and Perfusion Kinetics in Response to Fractionated Radiation Therapy in FaDu Head and Neck Cancer Xenografts Are Related to Treatment Outcome

Abstract

Purpose: To test whether oxygenation kinetics correlate with the likelihood for local tumor control after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We used diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to noninvasively measure tumor vascular oxygenation and total hemoglobin concentration associated with radiation therapy of 5 daily fractions (7.5, 9, or 13.5 Gy/d) in FaDu xenografts. Spectroscopy measurements were obtained immediately before each daily radiation fraction and during the week after radiation therapy. Oxygen saturation and total hemoglobin concentration were computed using an inverse Monte Carlo model. Results: First, oxygenation kinetics during and after radiation therapy, but before tumor volumes changed, were associated with local tumor control. Locally controlled tumors exhibited significantly faster increases in oxygenation after radiation therapy (days 12-15) compared with tumors that recurred locally. Second, within the group of tumors that recurred, faster increases in oxygenation during radiation therapy (day 3-5 interval) were correlated with earlier recurrence times. An area of 0.74 under the receiver operating characteristic curve was achieved when classifying the local control tumors from all irradiated tumors using the oxygen kinetics with a logistic regression model. Third, the rate of increase in oxygenation was radiation dose dependent. Radiation doses ≤9.5 Gy/d did not initiate an increase in oxygenation, whereas 13.5 Gy/dmore » triggered significant increases in oxygenation during and after radiation therapy. Conclusions: Additional confirmation is required in other tumor models, but these results suggest that monitoring tumor oxygenation kinetics could aid in the prediction of local tumor control after radiation therapy.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]; ;  [5];  [3];  [4];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [3]
  1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States)
  2. Department of Physics, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio (United States)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States)
  4. (United States)
  5. Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645665
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 96; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; FRACTIONATED IRRADIATION; GY RANGE 01-10; GY RANGE 10-100; HEAD; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NECK; NEOPLASMS; OXYGEN; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Hu, Fangyao, Vishwanath, Karthik, Salama, Joseph K., Division of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Erkanli, Alaattin, Peterson, Bercedis, Oleson, James R., Division of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Lee, Walter T., Division of Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Section of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Brizel, David M., Division of Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Ramanujam, Nimmi, and Dewhirst, Mark W., E-mail: mark.dewhirst@duke.edu. Oxygen and Perfusion Kinetics in Response to Fractionated Radiation Therapy in FaDu Head and Neck Cancer Xenografts Are Related to Treatment Outcome. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.06.007.
Hu, Fangyao, Vishwanath, Karthik, Salama, Joseph K., Division of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Erkanli, Alaattin, Peterson, Bercedis, Oleson, James R., Division of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Lee, Walter T., Division of Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Section of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Brizel, David M., Division of Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Ramanujam, Nimmi, & Dewhirst, Mark W., E-mail: mark.dewhirst@duke.edu. Oxygen and Perfusion Kinetics in Response to Fractionated Radiation Therapy in FaDu Head and Neck Cancer Xenografts Are Related to Treatment Outcome. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.06.007.
Hu, Fangyao, Vishwanath, Karthik, Salama, Joseph K., Division of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Erkanli, Alaattin, Peterson, Bercedis, Oleson, James R., Division of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Lee, Walter T., Division of Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Section of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Brizel, David M., Division of Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, Ramanujam, Nimmi, and Dewhirst, Mark W., E-mail: mark.dewhirst@duke.edu. Sat . "Oxygen and Perfusion Kinetics in Response to Fractionated Radiation Therapy in FaDu Head and Neck Cancer Xenografts Are Related to Treatment Outcome". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.06.007.
@article{osti_22645665,
title = {Oxygen and Perfusion Kinetics in Response to Fractionated Radiation Therapy in FaDu Head and Neck Cancer Xenografts Are Related to Treatment Outcome},
author = {Hu, Fangyao and Vishwanath, Karthik and Salama, Joseph K. and Division of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina and Erkanli, Alaattin and Peterson, Bercedis and Oleson, James R. and Division of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina and Lee, Walter T. and Division of Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina and Section of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina and Brizel, David M. and Division of Head and Neck Surgery and Communicative Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina and Ramanujam, Nimmi and Dewhirst, Mark W., E-mail: mark.dewhirst@duke.edu},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To test whether oxygenation kinetics correlate with the likelihood for local tumor control after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We used diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to noninvasively measure tumor vascular oxygenation and total hemoglobin concentration associated with radiation therapy of 5 daily fractions (7.5, 9, or 13.5 Gy/d) in FaDu xenografts. Spectroscopy measurements were obtained immediately before each daily radiation fraction and during the week after radiation therapy. Oxygen saturation and total hemoglobin concentration were computed using an inverse Monte Carlo model. Results: First, oxygenation kinetics during and after radiation therapy, but before tumor volumes changed, were associated with local tumor control. Locally controlled tumors exhibited significantly faster increases in oxygenation after radiation therapy (days 12-15) compared with tumors that recurred locally. Second, within the group of tumors that recurred, faster increases in oxygenation during radiation therapy (day 3-5 interval) were correlated with earlier recurrence times. An area of 0.74 under the receiver operating characteristic curve was achieved when classifying the local control tumors from all irradiated tumors using the oxygen kinetics with a logistic regression model. Third, the rate of increase in oxygenation was radiation dose dependent. Radiation doses ≤9.5 Gy/d did not initiate an increase in oxygenation, whereas 13.5 Gy/d triggered significant increases in oxygenation during and after radiation therapy. Conclusions: Additional confirmation is required in other tumor models, but these results suggest that monitoring tumor oxygenation kinetics could aid in the prediction of local tumor control after radiation therapy.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.06.007},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 96,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}