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Title: Multi-institutional Validation Study of Commercially Available Deformable Image Registration Software for Thoracic Images

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the accuracy of the commercially available deformable image registration (DIR) software for thoracic images at multiple institutions. Methods and Materials: Thoracic 4-dimensional (4D) CT images of 10 patients with esophageal or lung cancer were used. Datasets for these patients were provided by DIR-lab ( (dir-lab.com)) and included a coordinate list of anatomic landmarks (300 bronchial bifurcations) that had been manually identified. Deformable image registration was performed between the peak-inhale and -exhale images. Deformable image registration error was determined by calculating the difference at each landmark point between the displacement calculated by DIR software and that calculated by the landmark. Results: Eleven institutions participated in this study: 4 used RayStation (RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm, Sweden), 5 used MIM Software (Cleveland, OH), and 3 used Velocity (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The ranges of the average absolute registration errors over all cases were as follows: 0.48 to 1.51 mm (right-left), 0.53 to 2.86 mm (anterior-posterior), 0.85 to 4.46 mm (superior-inferior), and 1.26 to 6.20 mm (3-dimensional). For each DIR software package, the average 3-dimensional registration error (range) was as follows: RayStation, 3.28 mm (1.26-3.91 mm); MIM Software, 3.29 mm (2.17-3.61 mm); and Velocity, 5.01 mm (4.02-6.20 mm). These results demonstrate that there was moderate variation among institutions, although themore » DIR software was the same. Conclusions: We evaluated the commercially available DIR software using thoracic 4D-CT images from multiple centers. Our results demonstrated that DIR accuracy differed among institutions because it was dependent on both the DIR software and procedure. Our results could be helpful for establishing prospective clinical trials and for the widespread use of DIR software. In addition, for clinical care, we should try to find the optimal DIR procedure using thoracic 4D-CT data.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [1]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama (Japan)
  4. Department of Radiotherapy, Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center, Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)
  5. Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Hachioji (Japan)
  6. Department of Radiological Technology, Tokushima University Hospital, Tokushima (Japan)
  7. Department of Radiation Physics and Technology, Southern Tohoku Proton Therapy Center, Koriyama (Japan)
  8. Department of Radiation Oncology, St Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)
  9. Department of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita (Japan)
  10. Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)
  11. Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Bay Advanced Imaging and Radiation Oncology Clinic Makuhari, Chiba (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645660
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 96; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CLINICAL TRIALS; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; ERRORS; IMAGES

Citation Formats

Kadoya, Noriyuki, E-mail: kadoya.n@rad.med.tohoku.ac.jp, Nakajima, Yujiro, Saito, Masahide, Miyabe, Yuki, Kurooka, Masahiko, Kito, Satoshi, Fujita, Yukio, Sasaki, Motoharu, Arai, Kazuhiro, Tani, Kensuke, Yagi, Masashi, Wakita, Akihisa, Tohyama, Naoki, and Jingu, Keiichi. Multi-institutional Validation Study of Commercially Available Deformable Image Registration Software for Thoracic Images. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.05.012.
Kadoya, Noriyuki, E-mail: kadoya.n@rad.med.tohoku.ac.jp, Nakajima, Yujiro, Saito, Masahide, Miyabe, Yuki, Kurooka, Masahiko, Kito, Satoshi, Fujita, Yukio, Sasaki, Motoharu, Arai, Kazuhiro, Tani, Kensuke, Yagi, Masashi, Wakita, Akihisa, Tohyama, Naoki, & Jingu, Keiichi. Multi-institutional Validation Study of Commercially Available Deformable Image Registration Software for Thoracic Images. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.05.012.
Kadoya, Noriyuki, E-mail: kadoya.n@rad.med.tohoku.ac.jp, Nakajima, Yujiro, Saito, Masahide, Miyabe, Yuki, Kurooka, Masahiko, Kito, Satoshi, Fujita, Yukio, Sasaki, Motoharu, Arai, Kazuhiro, Tani, Kensuke, Yagi, Masashi, Wakita, Akihisa, Tohyama, Naoki, and Jingu, Keiichi. Sat . "Multi-institutional Validation Study of Commercially Available Deformable Image Registration Software for Thoracic Images". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.05.012.
@article{osti_22645660,
title = {Multi-institutional Validation Study of Commercially Available Deformable Image Registration Software for Thoracic Images},
author = {Kadoya, Noriyuki, E-mail: kadoya.n@rad.med.tohoku.ac.jp and Nakajima, Yujiro and Saito, Masahide and Miyabe, Yuki and Kurooka, Masahiko and Kito, Satoshi and Fujita, Yukio and Sasaki, Motoharu and Arai, Kazuhiro and Tani, Kensuke and Yagi, Masashi and Wakita, Akihisa and Tohyama, Naoki and Jingu, Keiichi},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To assess the accuracy of the commercially available deformable image registration (DIR) software for thoracic images at multiple institutions. Methods and Materials: Thoracic 4-dimensional (4D) CT images of 10 patients with esophageal or lung cancer were used. Datasets for these patients were provided by DIR-lab ( (dir-lab.com)) and included a coordinate list of anatomic landmarks (300 bronchial bifurcations) that had been manually identified. Deformable image registration was performed between the peak-inhale and -exhale images. Deformable image registration error was determined by calculating the difference at each landmark point between the displacement calculated by DIR software and that calculated by the landmark. Results: Eleven institutions participated in this study: 4 used RayStation (RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm, Sweden), 5 used MIM Software (Cleveland, OH), and 3 used Velocity (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The ranges of the average absolute registration errors over all cases were as follows: 0.48 to 1.51 mm (right-left), 0.53 to 2.86 mm (anterior-posterior), 0.85 to 4.46 mm (superior-inferior), and 1.26 to 6.20 mm (3-dimensional). For each DIR software package, the average 3-dimensional registration error (range) was as follows: RayStation, 3.28 mm (1.26-3.91 mm); MIM Software, 3.29 mm (2.17-3.61 mm); and Velocity, 5.01 mm (4.02-6.20 mm). These results demonstrate that there was moderate variation among institutions, although the DIR software was the same. Conclusions: We evaluated the commercially available DIR software using thoracic 4D-CT images from multiple centers. Our results demonstrated that DIR accuracy differed among institutions because it was dependent on both the DIR software and procedure. Our results could be helpful for establishing prospective clinical trials and for the widespread use of DIR software. In addition, for clinical care, we should try to find the optimal DIR procedure using thoracic 4D-CT data.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2016.05.012},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 96,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}