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Title: Oxidation model of polycrystalline lead-chalcogenide layers in an iodine-containing medium

Abstract

Model concepts of control over the formation of oxide shells in the course of oxidation are confirmed on the basis of experimental results obtained in a study of the fundamental aspects of how nanostructured layers are formed upon diffusion annealing on faceted single crystals of lead chalcogenides. Auger-spectroscopic data on the distribution of the elemental composition over the thickness of layers based on lead selenide–cadmium selenide solid solutions are presented.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University LETI (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645502
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Semiconductors; Journal Volume: 50; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ANNEALING; AUGER ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY; CADMIUM SELENIDES; DIFFUSION; IODINE; LAYERS; LEAD; LEAD SELENIDES; MONOCRYSTALS; NANOSTRUCTURES; OXIDATION; OXIDES; POLYCRYSTALS; SOLID SOLUTIONS

Citation Formats

Maraeva, E. V., E-mail: jenvmar@mail.ru, Moshnikov, V. A., Petrov, A. A., and Tairov, Yu. M.. Oxidation model of polycrystalline lead-chalcogenide layers in an iodine-containing medium. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1134/S1063782616060154.
Maraeva, E. V., E-mail: jenvmar@mail.ru, Moshnikov, V. A., Petrov, A. A., & Tairov, Yu. M.. Oxidation model of polycrystalline lead-chalcogenide layers in an iodine-containing medium. United States. doi:10.1134/S1063782616060154.
Maraeva, E. V., E-mail: jenvmar@mail.ru, Moshnikov, V. A., Petrov, A. A., and Tairov, Yu. M.. 2016. "Oxidation model of polycrystalline lead-chalcogenide layers in an iodine-containing medium". United States. doi:10.1134/S1063782616060154.
@article{osti_22645502,
title = {Oxidation model of polycrystalline lead-chalcogenide layers in an iodine-containing medium},
author = {Maraeva, E. V., E-mail: jenvmar@mail.ru and Moshnikov, V. A. and Petrov, A. A. and Tairov, Yu. M.},
abstractNote = {Model concepts of control over the formation of oxide shells in the course of oxidation are confirmed on the basis of experimental results obtained in a study of the fundamental aspects of how nanostructured layers are formed upon diffusion annealing on faceted single crystals of lead chalcogenides. Auger-spectroscopic data on the distribution of the elemental composition over the thickness of layers based on lead selenide–cadmium selenide solid solutions are presented.},
doi = {10.1134/S1063782616060154},
journal = {Semiconductors},
number = 6,
volume = 50,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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