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Title: On the photon annealing of silicon-implanted gallium-nitride layers

Abstract

The conditions for the formation of ion-doped layers in gallium nitride upon the incorporation of silicon ions followed by photon annealing in the presence of silicon dioxide and nitride coatings are analyzed. The conditions of the formation of ion-doped layers with a high degree of impurity activation are established. The temperature dependences of the surface concentration and mobility of charge carriers in ion-doped GaN layers annealed at different temperatures are studied.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Novgorod State University (Russian Federation)
  2. OKB-Planeta, Inc. (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645495
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Semiconductors; Journal Volume: 50; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ANNEALING; CARRIER MOBILITY; CHARGE CARRIERS; COATINGS; CONCENTRATION RATIO; DOPED MATERIALS; GALLIUM; GALLIUM NITRIDES; LAYERS; PHOTONS; SILICON; SILICON IONS; SILICON OXIDES; SURFACES; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE

Citation Formats

Seleznev, B. I., E-mail: Boris.Seleznev@novsu.ru, Moskalev, G. Ya., and Fedorov, D. G.. On the photon annealing of silicon-implanted gallium-nitride layers. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1134/S1063782616060221.
Seleznev, B. I., E-mail: Boris.Seleznev@novsu.ru, Moskalev, G. Ya., & Fedorov, D. G.. On the photon annealing of silicon-implanted gallium-nitride layers. United States. doi:10.1134/S1063782616060221.
Seleznev, B. I., E-mail: Boris.Seleznev@novsu.ru, Moskalev, G. Ya., and Fedorov, D. G.. 2016. "On the photon annealing of silicon-implanted gallium-nitride layers". United States. doi:10.1134/S1063782616060221.
@article{osti_22645495,
title = {On the photon annealing of silicon-implanted gallium-nitride layers},
author = {Seleznev, B. I., E-mail: Boris.Seleznev@novsu.ru and Moskalev, G. Ya. and Fedorov, D. G.},
abstractNote = {The conditions for the formation of ion-doped layers in gallium nitride upon the incorporation of silicon ions followed by photon annealing in the presence of silicon dioxide and nitride coatings are analyzed. The conditions of the formation of ion-doped layers with a high degree of impurity activation are established. The temperature dependences of the surface concentration and mobility of charge carriers in ion-doped GaN layers annealed at different temperatures are studied.},
doi = {10.1134/S1063782616060221},
journal = {Semiconductors},
number = 6,
volume = 50,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • In this paper, we examine Si and Te ion implant damage removal in GaN as a function of implantation dose, and implantation and annealing temperature. Transmission electron microscopy shows that amorphous layers, which can result from high-dose implantation, recrystallize between 800 and 1100{degree}C to very defective polycrystalline material. Lower-dose implants (down to 5{times}10{sup 13}cm{sup {minus}2}), which are not amorphous but defective after implantation, also anneal poorly up to 1100{degree}C, leaving a coarse network of extended defects. Despite such disorder, a high fraction of Te is found to be substitutional in GaN both following implantation and after annealing. Furthermore, although elevated-temperaturemore » implants result in less disorder after implantation, this damage is also impossible to anneal out completely by 1100{degree}C. The implications of this study are that considerably higher annealing temperatures will be needed to remove damage for optimum electrical properties. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}« less
  • Effect of irradiation with high reactor-neutron fluences ({Phi} = 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}-8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2}) and subsequent heat treatments in the temperature range 100-1000 Degree-Sign C on the electrical properties and lattice constant of epitaxial GaN layers grown on an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate is considered. It is shown that, with the neutron fluence increasing to (1-2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}, the resistivity of the material grows to values of about 10{sup 10} {Omega} cm because of the formation of radiation defects, and, with the fluence raised further, the resistivity passes through a maximum and thenmore » decreases to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} {Omega} cm at 300 K, which is accounted for by the appearance of a hopping conductivity via deep defects in the overlapping outer parts of disordered regions. With the neutron fluence raised to 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2}, the lattice constant c increases by 0.38% at a nearly unchanged parameter a. Heat treatment of irradiated samples at temperatures as high as 1000 Degree-Sign C does not fully restore the lattice constant and the electrical parameters of the material.« less
  • The annealing of ion implantation damage (in the form of amorphous layers and/or the layers containing only dislocation loops) in silicon and gallium arsenide have been investigated. The annealing of amorphous layers occurs by solid-phase-epitaxial growth and that of dislocation loops involves primarily loop-coalescence as a result of conservative climb and glide processes. The annealing of isolated loops occurs primarily by a bulk diffusion process. Almost a complete annealing of displacement damage is possible for shallow implants provided loop-coalescence does not lead to the formation of cross-grid of dislocations. For deep implants, the free surface cannot provide an effective sinkmore » for defects as in the case of shallow implants. Dopant profiles can be controlled to less than 1000 A in layers having good electrical properties. The enhanced diffusion of dopants is observed probably due to entrapment of point defects in the annealed regions. 17 references, 11 figures.« less