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Title: Stereotactic Radiofrequency Ablation for Metastatic Melanoma to the Liver

Abstract

PurposeTo evaluate the outcome of patients with melanoma liver metastasis treated with stereotactic radiofrequency ablation (SRFA).Material and MethodFollowing IRB approval, a retrospective evaluation of the treatment of 20 patients with 75 melanoma liver metastases was performed.ResultsA median number of 2 lesions (range 1–14) per patient with a median size of 1.7 cm (range 0.5–14.5 cm) were treated. 67 lesions were <3 cm (89.3 %) and 8 lesions were >3 cm (10.7 %). Per patient a median of 1 ablation session was performed (range: 1–4) totaling 34 sessions. There were no procedure-related deaths and all major complications (n = 3) could be easily treated by pleural drainages. The primary and secondary success rates were 89.3 and 93.3 %, respectively. The overall local recurrence rate was 13.3 %. Four of ten local recurrences were re-treated successfully by SRFA. During follow-up, 9/20 patients developed extrahepatic metastatic disease and 10/20 had liver recurrence at any location. The median OS from the date of SRFA was 19.3 months, with an OS of 64, 41, and 17 % at 1, 3, and 5 years, with no significant difference for patients with cutaneous and ocular melanoma. The median DFS after SRFA for all 20 patients was 9.5 months, with 37, 9, and 0 % at 1, 3, and 5 years.ConclusionsDue to the highmore » local curative potential and the promising long-term survival rates associated with minimal morbidity and mortality, radiofrequency ablation seems to be an attractive alternative to resection in patients with melanoma liver metastases.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Section of Interventional Oncology - Microinvasive Therapy (SIP) (Austria)
  2. Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Dermatology (Austria)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645485
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ABLATION; DEATH; DISEASE INCIDENCE; EVALUATION; LIVER; MELANOMAS; METASTASES; MORTALITY; PATIENTS; RADIOWAVE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Bale, Reto, E-mail: reto.bale@i-med.ac.at, Schullian, Peter, Schmuth, Matthias, Widmann, Gerlig, Jaschke, Werner, and Weinlich, Georg. Stereotactic Radiofrequency Ablation for Metastatic Melanoma to the Liver. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1336-Z.
Bale, Reto, E-mail: reto.bale@i-med.ac.at, Schullian, Peter, Schmuth, Matthias, Widmann, Gerlig, Jaschke, Werner, & Weinlich, Georg. Stereotactic Radiofrequency Ablation for Metastatic Melanoma to the Liver. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1336-Z.
Bale, Reto, E-mail: reto.bale@i-med.ac.at, Schullian, Peter, Schmuth, Matthias, Widmann, Gerlig, Jaschke, Werner, and Weinlich, Georg. 2016. "Stereotactic Radiofrequency Ablation for Metastatic Melanoma to the Liver". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1336-Z.
@article{osti_22645485,
title = {Stereotactic Radiofrequency Ablation for Metastatic Melanoma to the Liver},
author = {Bale, Reto, E-mail: reto.bale@i-med.ac.at and Schullian, Peter and Schmuth, Matthias and Widmann, Gerlig and Jaschke, Werner and Weinlich, Georg},
abstractNote = {PurposeTo evaluate the outcome of patients with melanoma liver metastasis treated with stereotactic radiofrequency ablation (SRFA).Material and MethodFollowing IRB approval, a retrospective evaluation of the treatment of 20 patients with 75 melanoma liver metastases was performed.ResultsA median number of 2 lesions (range 1–14) per patient with a median size of 1.7 cm (range 0.5–14.5 cm) were treated. 67 lesions were <3 cm (89.3 %) and 8 lesions were >3 cm (10.7 %). Per patient a median of 1 ablation session was performed (range: 1–4) totaling 34 sessions. There were no procedure-related deaths and all major complications (n = 3) could be easily treated by pleural drainages. The primary and secondary success rates were 89.3 and 93.3 %, respectively. The overall local recurrence rate was 13.3 %. Four of ten local recurrences were re-treated successfully by SRFA. During follow-up, 9/20 patients developed extrahepatic metastatic disease and 10/20 had liver recurrence at any location. The median OS from the date of SRFA was 19.3 months, with an OS of 64, 41, and 17 % at 1, 3, and 5 years, with no significant difference for patients with cutaneous and ocular melanoma. The median DFS after SRFA for all 20 patients was 9.5 months, with 37, 9, and 0 % at 1, 3, and 5 years.ConclusionsDue to the high local curative potential and the promising long-term survival rates associated with minimal morbidity and mortality, radiofrequency ablation seems to be an attractive alternative to resection in patients with melanoma liver metastases.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-016-1336-Z},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 8,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate technique effectiveness, safety, and interoperator performance of stereotactic radiofrequency ablation (SRFA) of liver lesions. Methods: Retrospective review including 90 consecutive patients from January 2008 to January 2010 with 106 computed tomography-guided SRFA sessions using both single and multiple electrodes for the treatment of 177 lesions: 72 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 105 metastases with a mean size of 2.9 cm (range 0.5-11 cm). Technique effectiveness and 1-year local recurrence were evaluated by computed tomographic scans. Complications, mortality, and hospital days were recorded. The performance between an experienced and inexperienced interventional radiologist was compared. Results: The overall technique effectivenessmore » after a single SRFA was 95.5% (93.1% for HCC and 97.1% for metastases). Four of the eight unsuccessfully treated lesions could be retreated (secondary technique effectiveness of 97.7%). Local recurrence at 1 year was 2.9%. Technique effectiveness was significantly different for lesions <5 cm (96.7%) and >5 cm (87.5%) (P = 0.044) but not for lesions <3 cm (95.9%) and 3-5 cm (100%). Compared to clear parenchymal property (97.3%), vessel vicinity (93.3%) (P = 0.349) and subcapsular (95.2%) (P = 0.532) had no, but hollow viscera vicinity (83.3%) had a significantly lower technique effectiveness (P = 0.020). Mortality rate was 0.9%. Major complications and hospital days were higher for cirrhosis Child-Pugh B (20%, 7.2 days) than Child-Pugh A (3.1%, 4.7 days) patients and for metastases (5.1%, 4.3 days). There was no significant difference in interoperator performance. Conclusions: RFA allowed for efficient, reliable, and safe ablation of large-volume liver disease.« less
  • Purpose: To conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis to determine whether stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a cost-effective therapy compared with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for patients with unresectable colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using a Markov model and 1-month cycle over a lifetime horizon. Transition probabilities, quality of life utilities, and costs associated with SBRT and RFA were captured in the model on the basis of a comprehensive literature review and Medicare reimbursements in 2014. Strategies were compared using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, with effectiveness measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). To account formore » model uncertainty, 1-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Strategies were evaluated with a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000 per QALY gained. Results: In base case analysis, treatment costs for 3 fractions of SBRT and 1 RFA procedure were $13,000 and $4397, respectively. Median survival was assumed the same for both strategies (25 months). The SBRT costs $8202 more than RFA while gaining 0.05 QALYs, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $164,660 per QALY gained. In 1-way sensitivity analyses, results were most sensitive to variation of median survival from both treatments. Stereotactic body radiation therapy was economically reasonable if better survival was presumed (>1 month gain) or if used for large tumors (>4 cm). Conclusions: If equal survival is assumed, SBRT is not cost-effective compared with RFA for inoperable colorectal liver metastases. However, if better local control leads to small survival gains with SBRT, this strategy becomes cost-effective. Ideally, these results should be confirmed with prospective comparative data.« less
  • Purpose. To investigate the pain-alleviating effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on metastatic bone tumors in relation to tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis rate following RFA. Methods. Subjects comprised 24 patients with 28 painful metastatic bone tumors. A 17G internally cooled electrode was inserted into the tumor for CT guidance and ablation was performed. Bone cement was injected following RFA for 4 tumors involving a weight-bearing bone, while 5 tumors were treated using combined RFA and external irradiation. Percent necrosis rate of the tumor was measured using contrast-enhanced computed tomography 1 week after RFA. Results. Improvement in themore » visual analog scale (VAS) score was 4.6 {+-} 2.2 for large tumors (>5 cm, n = 12), 3.7 {+-} 1.8 for medium-sized tumors (3.1-5.0 cm, n = 11), and 3.5 {+-} 1.7 for small tumors ({<=}3 cm, n = 4), with no significant differences noted among tumor sizes. Improvement in the VAS score was 3.5 {+-} 1.3 for the 4 tumors in the RFA + bone cement group, 3.2 {+-} 1.9 for the 5 tumors in the RFA + radiation therapy group, and 4.8 {+-} 2.2 for the 18 tumors in the RFA group. No significant differences were identified between groups. The improvement in the VAS score was 3.8 {+-} 2.3, 4.0 {+-} 1.9, and 4.7 {+-} 2.6 in patients with tumor necrosis rates of 0-49%, 50-74%, and 75-100%, respectively. No significant association was observed among these three groups. Conclusion. Percutaneous RFA therapy was effective in relieving pain due to metastatic bone tumors. No relationships appear to exist between initial response and tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis.« less
  • An 82-year-old man, who was diagnosed in 2002 with an oncocytic (Hürthle cell) thyroid carcinoma, was initially treated by local surgery and was refractory to radioiodine treatment. The patient had successive secondary recurrences from 2006 onwards. Metastases were suspected due to an elevation of thyroglobulin in serum. Hypermetabolic nodules were targeted using FDG PET as well as CT-guided radiofrequency ablations. Thyroglobulin levels decreased following each procedure. 10 years later, tolerance and efficacy are excellent; 23 lung metastases have been treated during 11 sessions without current relapse. Respiratory function and quality of life are not altered. This report illustrates how radiofrequencymore » ablation can be efficiently integrated into the long-term management of poorly aggressive oligometastatic cancer, in combination with other local and/or systemic therapies.« less
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in change of size and CT value between local recurrences and tumor-free areas after CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of hepatic metastases during follow-up by means of dedicated software for automatic evaluation of hepatic lesions. Thirty-two patients with 54 liver metastases from breast or colorectal cancer underwent triphasic contrast-enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) to evaluate hepatic metastatic spread and localization before CT-guided RFA and for follow-up after intervention. Sixteen of these patients (65.1 {+-} 10.3 years) with 30 metastases stayed tumor-free (group 1), while the other group (n = 16 with 24more » metastases; 62.0 {+-} 13.8 years) suffered from local recurrent disease (group 2). Applying an automated software tool (SyngoCT Oncology; Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), size parameters (volume, RECIST, WHO) and attenuation were measured within the lesions before, 1 day after, and 28 days after RFA treatment. The natural logarithm (ln) of the quotient of the volume 1 day versus 28 days after RFA treament was computed: lnQ1//28/0{sub volume}. Analogously, ln ratios of RECIST, WHO, and attenuation were computed and statistically evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA. One lesion in group 2 was excluded from further evaluation due to automated missegmentation. Statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed with respect to initial volume, RECIST, and WHO (p < 0.05). Furthermore, ln ratios corresponding to volume, RECIST, and WHO differed significantly between the two groups. Attenuation evaluations showed no significant differences, but there was a trend toward attenuation assessment for the parameter lnQ28/0{sub attenuation} (p = 0.0527), showing higher values for group 1 (-0.4 {+-} 0.3) compared to group 2 (-0.2 {+-} 0.2). In conclusion, hepatic metastases and their zone of coagulation necrosis after RFA differed significantly between tumor-free and local-recurrent ablation zones with respect to the corresponding size parameters. A new parameter (lnQ1//28/0{sub volume/RECIST/WHO/attenuation}) was introduced, which appears to be of prognostic value at early follow-up CT.« less