skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: A Retrospective Comparison of Ultrasound-Assisted Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis and Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis Alone for Treatment of Proximal Deep Vein Thrombosis

Abstract

BackgroundRecent studies have suggested that catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) reduces development of post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). Ultrasound-assisted CDT (USCDT) might enhance the efficiency of thrombolysis. We aimed to compare USCDT with CDT on efficacy, safety, development of PTS, and quality of life after long-term follow-up.MethodsWe describe a retrospective case series of 94 consecutive patients admitted with iliofemoral or more proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) to the University Hospital from 2002 to 2011, treated either with CDT or USCDT. Scheduled follow-up visits took place between April 2013 and January 2014. Venography measured the degree of residual luminal obstruction of the affected veins. Each patient completed the Short Form 36-item health survey assessment and the Venous Insufficiency Epidemiological and Economic Study-Quality of Life/Symptoms questionnaires. PTS was assessed using the Villalta scale.ResultsRisk factors of DVT were equally distributed between groups. In the USCDT group, we observed a significant decline in the duration of thrombolytic treatment (<48 h: 27 vs. 10 %), shortened hospital stay (median 6.0 days (IQR 5.0–9.0) vs. 8.0 (IQR 5.8–12.0)), and less implantation of (intravenous) stents (30 vs. 55 %). There was no difference in patency (76 vs. 79 % fully patent), prevalence of PTS (52 vs. 55 %), or quality of life between groups after long-term follow-upmore » (median 65 months, range: 15–141).ConclusionsIn this observational study, USCDT was associated with shortened treatment duration, shorter hospital stay, and less intravenous stenting, compared to CDT alone without affecting the long-term prevalence of PTS or quality of life.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3];  [1]
  1. UiT – The Arctic University of Norway, K. G. Jebsen – Thrombosis Research and Expertise Centre (TREC), Department of Clinical Medicine (Norway)
  2. UiT – The Arctic University of Norway, Research Group Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases, Department of Community Medicine (Norway)
  3. University Hospital of North Norway, Department of Radiology (Norway)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645473
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); Article Copyright (c) 2016 The Author(s); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; HOSPITALS; PATIENTS; PHENOBARBITAL; THROMBOSIS; VEINS

Citation Formats

Tichelaar, Vladimir Y. I. G., E-mail: ynse.i.tichelaar@uit.no, Brodin, Ellen E., Vik, Anders, Isaksen, Trond, Skjeldestad, Finn Egil, Kumar, Satish, Trasti, Nora C., Singh, Kulbir, and Hansen, John-Bjarne. A Retrospective Comparison of Ultrasound-Assisted Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis and Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis Alone for Treatment of Proximal Deep Vein Thrombosis. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1367-5.
Tichelaar, Vladimir Y. I. G., E-mail: ynse.i.tichelaar@uit.no, Brodin, Ellen E., Vik, Anders, Isaksen, Trond, Skjeldestad, Finn Egil, Kumar, Satish, Trasti, Nora C., Singh, Kulbir, & Hansen, John-Bjarne. A Retrospective Comparison of Ultrasound-Assisted Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis and Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis Alone for Treatment of Proximal Deep Vein Thrombosis. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1367-5.
Tichelaar, Vladimir Y. I. G., E-mail: ynse.i.tichelaar@uit.no, Brodin, Ellen E., Vik, Anders, Isaksen, Trond, Skjeldestad, Finn Egil, Kumar, Satish, Trasti, Nora C., Singh, Kulbir, and Hansen, John-Bjarne. 2016. "A Retrospective Comparison of Ultrasound-Assisted Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis and Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis Alone for Treatment of Proximal Deep Vein Thrombosis". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1367-5.
@article{osti_22645473,
title = {A Retrospective Comparison of Ultrasound-Assisted Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis and Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis Alone for Treatment of Proximal Deep Vein Thrombosis},
author = {Tichelaar, Vladimir Y. I. G., E-mail: ynse.i.tichelaar@uit.no and Brodin, Ellen E. and Vik, Anders and Isaksen, Trond and Skjeldestad, Finn Egil and Kumar, Satish and Trasti, Nora C. and Singh, Kulbir and Hansen, John-Bjarne},
abstractNote = {BackgroundRecent studies have suggested that catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) reduces development of post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). Ultrasound-assisted CDT (USCDT) might enhance the efficiency of thrombolysis. We aimed to compare USCDT with CDT on efficacy, safety, development of PTS, and quality of life after long-term follow-up.MethodsWe describe a retrospective case series of 94 consecutive patients admitted with iliofemoral or more proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) to the University Hospital from 2002 to 2011, treated either with CDT or USCDT. Scheduled follow-up visits took place between April 2013 and January 2014. Venography measured the degree of residual luminal obstruction of the affected veins. Each patient completed the Short Form 36-item health survey assessment and the Venous Insufficiency Epidemiological and Economic Study-Quality of Life/Symptoms questionnaires. PTS was assessed using the Villalta scale.ResultsRisk factors of DVT were equally distributed between groups. In the USCDT group, we observed a significant decline in the duration of thrombolytic treatment (<48 h: 27 vs. 10 %), shortened hospital stay (median 6.0 days (IQR 5.0–9.0) vs. 8.0 (IQR 5.8–12.0)), and less implantation of (intravenous) stents (30 vs. 55 %). There was no difference in patency (76 vs. 79 % fully patent), prevalence of PTS (52 vs. 55 %), or quality of life between groups after long-term follow-up (median 65 months, range: 15–141).ConclusionsIn this observational study, USCDT was associated with shortened treatment duration, shorter hospital stay, and less intravenous stenting, compared to CDT alone without affecting the long-term prevalence of PTS or quality of life.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-016-1367-5},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 8,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
  • Purpose. To compare the efficacy of catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) alone versus CDT with rheolytic percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) for upper and lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Methods. A retrospective cohort of consecutive patients with acute iliofemoral or brachiosubclavian DVT treated with urokinase CDT was identified, and a chart review was conducted. Demographic characteristics, treatment duration, total lytic dose, clot lysis rates and complications were compared in patients treated with urokinase CDT alone or combined CDT and rheolytic PMT. Results. Forty limbs in 36 patients were treated with urokinase CDT alone. Twenty-seven limbs in 21 patients were treated with urokinasemore » CDT and rheolytic PMT. The mean treatment duration for urokinase CDT alone was 48.0 {+-} 27.1 hr compared with 26.3 {+-} 16.6 hr for urokinase CDT and rheolytic PMT (p = 0.0004). The mean urokinase dose required for CDT alone was 5.6 {+-} 5.3 million units compared with 2.7 {+-} 1.8 million units for urokinase CDT with rheolytic PMT (p = 0.008). Complete clot lysis was achieved in 73% (29/40) of DVT treated with urokinase CDT alone compared with 82% (22/27) treated with urokinase CDT with rheolytic PMT. Conclusion. Percutaneous CDT with rheolytic PMT is as effective as CDT alone for acute proximal extremity DVT but requires significantly shorter treatment duration and lower lytic doses. Randomized studies to confirm the benefits of pharmacomechanical thrombolysis in the treatment of acute proximal extremity DVT are warranted.« less
  • We present the case of a 14-year-old girl who developed acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in her right lower extremity. Laboratory testing revealed protein S deficiency, and the patient's father also had this abnormality with a history of lower extremity DVT. Manual thromboaspiration followed by catheter-directed thrombolysis resulted in total clearance of all thrombi. Computed tomography and later venography revealed an interrupted inferior vena cava. Catheter-directed thrombolysis is an established treatment for adults with acute DVT. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to describe catheter-directed thrombolysis in a pediatric patient with lower extremity DVT. Ourmore » results suggest that catheter-directed thrombolysis is safe and effective for use in selected older children and adolescents with acute DVT in the lower extremity.« less
  • Traditional anticoagulant treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the upper extremities (UEDVT) is associated with a relatively high incidence of postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) for UEDVT would provide efficient thrombolysis with less subsequent PTS than during traditional anticoagulation. Primary efficacy, complications, and long-term results after CDT are reported in a retrospective cohort (2002-2007) of patients (n = 30) with DVT in the upper extremities. PTS was assessed by a modified Villalta scale. UEDVT was unprovoked in 11 (37%) cases and effort related in 9 (30%) cases. The median duration of symptoms prior to CDT was 7.0 daysmore » (range, 1-30); median duration of thrombolysis treatment, 70 h (range, 24-264 h); and the median amount of rt-PA infused during CDT, 52 mg (range, 19-225 mg). Major bleeding was registered in three (9%) patients, and CDT was stopped prematurely in three patients due to local hematoma. No intracerebral bleeding, clinical pulmonary embolism, or deaths occurred during treatment. Grade II (>50%) or III (>90%) lysis was present in 29 patients (97%) at the end of CDT. Bleeding complications increased by each day of delay from the debut of symptoms to the start of treatment (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01-1.42). At follow-up (n = 29; median, 21 months; range, 5-58 months), 11 (38%) patients had occluded veins, whereas 18 (62%) had patent veins. However, stenosis of varying severity was present in eight of those with a patent vein. No patients had severe PTS, whereas six (21%) experienced mild PTS. In conclusion, our retrospective cohort study of patients with UEDVT showed that treatment restored venous drainage, with a subsequent low frequency of mild PTS at follow-up. Early intervention with CDT prevented bleeding complications.« less
  • Purpose: Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is a highly effective approach in the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). There are no data on the primary use of CDT with argatroban and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in patients without heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the combined administration of argatroban and tPA during CDT for massive DVT in patients without HIT. Methods: Thirty-three patients with massive symptomatic iliac and femoropopliteal DVT underwent CDT with tPA and argatroban within 28 {+-} 6 h of presentation. The dose of tPA was 0.75-1 mg/h throughmore » the infusion port and that of argatroban at 0.3-1 {mu}g/kg/min through the side port of the sheath. The patients were evaluated for the efficacy and safety of CDT and recurrent symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) at a mean follow-up of 22 months. Results: There was no bleeding or iatrogenic pulmonary embolism with the CDT regimen we used. Grade III lysis (complete resolution of thrombus on venography) was achieved in 30 patients (91 %). In 3 patients with additional inferior vena cava filter thrombosis, further thrombectomy of the filter was required. No patient developed recurrent VTE. Conclusion: Concomitant administration of argatroban and tPA is a highly safe and effective regimen for CDT for massive DVT.« less
  • Phlegmasia caerulea dolens (PCD) is a potentially disastrous complication of inferior vena cava filter insertion, and its optimum management has not been clearly established. We present a case report of a patient with pulmonary embolism and acute adrenal haemorrhage who developed PCD secondary to massive iliocaval thrombosis after insertion of a Cook Celect removable filter. Local intravenous catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), followed by systemic anticoagulation, achieved limb salvage and virtual resolution of symptoms at 3 months without complications. CDT can be a successful primary treatment of filter-associated PCD and can be safe in selected patients with acute nontraumatic haemorrhage. Systemic anticoagulationmore » may subsequently restore complete venous patency and may therefore be a useful approach to postthrombolysis management of residual iliocaval thrombus when filter removal is indicated.« less