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Title: Percutaneous Hepaticojejunostomy Using a Radiofrequency Wire for Management of a Postoperative Bile Leak

Abstract

Postoperative biliary complications following extensive hepatic resections are complex, often requiring a multidisciplinary team approach. We describe a case of a free bile duct leak following extended right hepatectomy and surgical hepaticojejunostomy treated with percutaneous transhepatic hepaticojejunostomy in which a radiofrequency guidewire was used to gain enteral access. A modified internal/external biliary catheter was left in place. The patient was enrolled in a benign biliary stricture protocol, and 8 months later, the catheter was removed following a normal cholangiogram and biliary manometric perfusion testing. At 3-month follow-up after catheter removal, the patient is asymptomatic with no clinical, biochemical, or radiographic evidence of biliary leak or obstruction.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)
  2. Johns Hopkins University, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645358
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: BSIR 2016: Britisch Society of Interventional Radiology 2016 annual meeting, Manchester (United Kingdom), 15-17 Nov 2016; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BILE; BILIARY TRACT; COMPLEXES; HEPATECTOMY; LEAKS; LIVER; MANAGEMENT; PATIENTS; RADIOWAVE RADIATION; WIRES

Citation Formats

Close, Orrie N., Akinwande, Olaguoke, Varma, Rakesh K., Santos, Ernesto, and Kim, Hyun S., E-mail: kevin.kim@yale.edu. Percutaneous Hepaticojejunostomy Using a Radiofrequency Wire for Management of a Postoperative Bile Leak. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1468-1.
Close, Orrie N., Akinwande, Olaguoke, Varma, Rakesh K., Santos, Ernesto, & Kim, Hyun S., E-mail: kevin.kim@yale.edu. Percutaneous Hepaticojejunostomy Using a Radiofrequency Wire for Management of a Postoperative Bile Leak. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1468-1.
Close, Orrie N., Akinwande, Olaguoke, Varma, Rakesh K., Santos, Ernesto, and Kim, Hyun S., E-mail: kevin.kim@yale.edu. Sun . "Percutaneous Hepaticojejunostomy Using a Radiofrequency Wire for Management of a Postoperative Bile Leak". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1468-1.
@article{osti_22645358,
title = {Percutaneous Hepaticojejunostomy Using a Radiofrequency Wire for Management of a Postoperative Bile Leak},
author = {Close, Orrie N. and Akinwande, Olaguoke and Varma, Rakesh K. and Santos, Ernesto and Kim, Hyun S., E-mail: kevin.kim@yale.edu},
abstractNote = {Postoperative biliary complications following extensive hepatic resections are complex, often requiring a multidisciplinary team approach. We describe a case of a free bile duct leak following extended right hepatectomy and surgical hepaticojejunostomy treated with percutaneous transhepatic hepaticojejunostomy in which a radiofrequency guidewire was used to gain enteral access. A modified internal/external biliary catheter was left in place. The patient was enrolled in a benign biliary stricture protocol, and 8 months later, the catheter was removed following a normal cholangiogram and biliary manometric perfusion testing. At 3-month follow-up after catheter removal, the patient is asymptomatic with no clinical, biochemical, or radiographic evidence of biliary leak or obstruction.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-016-1468-1},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 1,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sun Jan 15 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • No abstract prepared.
  • The authors describe the scintigraphic appearance of a case of subcapsular biliary leak. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m labeled radiopharmaceuticals is employed primarily for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis and for the demonstration of biliary tract patentcy. This procedure can also provide functional and morphologic information for evaluation of biliary tract trauma.
  • Purpose. To assess the feasibility of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) for the treatment of postsurgical biliary leaks in patients with nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts, its efficacy in restoring the integrity of bile ducts, and technical procedures to reduce morbidity. Methods. Seventeen patients out of 936 undergoing PTBD over a 20-year period had a noncholestatic liver and were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent surgery for cancer and suffered a postsurgical biliary leak of 345 ml/day on average; 71% were in poor condition and required permanent nutritional support. An endoscopic approach failed or was excluded due to inaccessibility of the bilemore » ducts. Results. Established biliary leaks and site of origin were diagnosed an average of 21 days (range 1-90 days) after surgery. In all cases percutaneous access to the biliary tree was achieved. An external (preleakage) drain was applied in 7 cases, 9 patients had an external-internal fistula bridging catheter, and 1 patient had a percutaneous hepatogastrostomy. Fistulas healed in an average of 31 days (range 3-118 days ) in 15 of 17 patients (88%) following PTBD. No major complications occurred after drainage. Post-PTBD cholangitis was observed in 6 of 17 patients (35%) and was related to biliary sludge formation occurring mostly when drainage lasted >30 days and was of the external-internal type. Median patient survival was 17.7 months and in all cases the repaired biliary leaks remained healed. Conclusions. PTBD is a feasible, effective, and safe procedure for the treatment of postsurgical biliary leaks. It is therefore a reliable alternative to surgical repair, which entails longer hospitalization and higher costs.« less
  • To report our single-center experience in managing symptomatic lymphoceles after lymphadenectomy for genitourinary and gynecologic malignancy and to compare clinical outcomes of percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) alone versus PCD with transcatheter povidone-iodine sclerotherapy (TPIS). The medical records of patients who presented for percutaneous drainage of pelvic lymphoceles from February 1999 to September 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. Catheters with prolonged outputs >50 cc/day were treated with TPIS. Technical success was defined as the ability to achieve complete resolution of the lymphocele. Clinical success was defined as resolution of the patient's symptoms that prompted the intervention. Sixty-four patients with 70 pelvic lymphocelesmore » were treated. Forty-six patients (71.9 %) had PCD, and 18 patients (28.1 %) had multisession TPIS. The mean initial cavity size was 294.9 cc for those treated with TPIS and 228.2 cc for those treated with PCD alone (range 15-1,600) (p = 0.59). Mean duration of catheter drainage was 19 days (29 days with TPIS, 16 days with PCD, p = 0.001). Mean clinical follow-up was 22.6 months. Technical success was 74.3 % with PCD and 100 % with TPIS. Clinical success was 97 % with PCD and 100 % with TPIS. Postprocedural complications included pericatheter fluid leakage (n = 4), catheter dislodgement (n = 3), catheter occlusion (n = 9), and secondary infection of the collection (n = 4). PCD of symptomatic lymphoceles is an effective postoperative management technique. Initial cavity size is not an accurate predictor of the need for TPIS. When indicated, TPIS is safe and effective with catheter outputs >50 cc/day.« less
  • Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate retrospectively the safety and efficacy of the percutaneous management of duodenal stump leakage with a Foley catheter after subtotal gastrectomy. Methods: Ten consecutive patients (M:F = 9:1, median age: 64 years) were included in this retrospective study. The duodenal stump leakages were diagnosed in all the patients within a median of 10 days (range, 6-20). At first, the patients underwent percutaneous drainage on the day of or the day after confirmation of the presence of duodenal stump leakage, and then the Foley catheters were replaced at a median of 9 days (range, 6-38)more » after the percutaneous drainage. Results: Foley catheters were placed successfully in the duodenal lumen of all the patients under a fluoroscopic guide. No complication was observed during and after the procedures in all the patients. All of the patients started a regular diet 1 day after the Foley catheter placement. The patients were discharged at a median of 7 days (range, 5-14) after the Foley catheter placement. The catheters were removed in an outpatient clinic 10-58 days (median, 28) after the Foley catheter placement. Conclusions: Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous Foley catheter placement may be a safe and effective treatment option for postoperative duodenal stump leakage and may allow for shorter hospital stays, earlier oral intake, and more effective control of leakage sites.« less