skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Embolic Brain Infarcts: A Rare Fatal Complication of Preoperative Embolization of a Massive Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Pleura

Abstract

Solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura (SFTP) is a rare intrathoracic neoplasm, often giant in size and highly vascular, which can make surgical resection very challenging. Preoperative percutaneous embolization before surgical removal can significantly reduce the risk of uncontrollable intraoperative hemorrhage. However, a rare potential life threatening complication could result from embolization of SFTP and must be taken into consideration. This report describes a 69-year-old female with a large right thoracic SFTP, who underwent preoperative angiography and embolization and developed diffuse embolic brain infarcts immediately after the administration of polyvinyl alcohol particles.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. University of Maryland Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645328
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BLOOD VESSELS; BRAIN; HEMORRHAGE; NEOPLASMS; PLEURA; SURGERY; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Patel, Shreyas R., E-mail: Shrey000@gmail.com, Vachhani, Prasann, and Moeslein, Fred. Embolic Brain Infarcts: A Rare Fatal Complication of Preoperative Embolization of a Massive Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Pleura. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1501-4.
Patel, Shreyas R., E-mail: Shrey000@gmail.com, Vachhani, Prasann, & Moeslein, Fred. Embolic Brain Infarcts: A Rare Fatal Complication of Preoperative Embolization of a Massive Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Pleura. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1501-4.
Patel, Shreyas R., E-mail: Shrey000@gmail.com, Vachhani, Prasann, and Moeslein, Fred. Wed . "Embolic Brain Infarcts: A Rare Fatal Complication of Preoperative Embolization of a Massive Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Pleura". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1501-4.
@article{osti_22645328,
title = {Embolic Brain Infarcts: A Rare Fatal Complication of Preoperative Embolization of a Massive Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Pleura},
author = {Patel, Shreyas R., E-mail: Shrey000@gmail.com and Vachhani, Prasann and Moeslein, Fred},
abstractNote = {Solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura (SFTP) is a rare intrathoracic neoplasm, often giant in size and highly vascular, which can make surgical resection very challenging. Preoperative percutaneous embolization before surgical removal can significantly reduce the risk of uncontrollable intraoperative hemorrhage. However, a rare potential life threatening complication could result from embolization of SFTP and must be taken into consideration. This report describes a 69-year-old female with a large right thoracic SFTP, who underwent preoperative angiography and embolization and developed diffuse embolic brain infarcts immediately after the administration of polyvinyl alcohol particles.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-016-1501-4},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 2,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Thoracic duct embolization represents a safe and effective method to treat postsurgical chylothorax. Complications of this procedure are rare despite transabdominal puncture of lymphatic channels for thoracic duct access, and chylous ascites is unreported. Herein, we describe a case of chylous ascites formation after lymphatic puncture and attempted cannulation. Our management approach is also discussed.
  • Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) is the treatment of choice for massive hemoptysis with rare complications that generally are mild and transient. There are few references in the medical literature with acute cerebral embolization as a complication of BAE. We report a case of intracranial posterior territory infarctions as a complication BAE in a patient with hemoptysis due to bronchiectasis.
  • Renal cell carcinoma arising in a horseshoe kidney is a rare entity. Preoperative tumor embolization can be performed to prevent massive bleeding complications during organ-preserving surgery. We report the first case of a patient with a tumor-bearing horseshoe-kidney in whom the preoperative embolization, already complex because of the abnormal vascular supply, was additionally complicated by an aortic dissection. An aberrant, horseshoe-kidney-supplying artery originated from the false dissection channel of the aorta, and thus had to be catheterized separately while the other tumor-supplying vessels could be reached via the true aortic lumen. After devascularization of the tumor, organ-preserving surgery was performedmore » without bleeding complications.« less
  • Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility and safety of minimally invasive, percutaneous techniques in metachronous recurrent renal cell cancers (RCCs) in solitary kidneys. Methods. In 4 patients, recurrent RCC was treated by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (RITA, StarBurst) alone, and in 2 patients by RFA in combination with superselective transarterial particle-lipiodol embolization using 3 Fr microcatheters. RFA was guided by computed tomography in 5 patients, and by magnetic resonance imaging in 1 patient. Mean tumor diameter was 26.7 mm (range 10-45 mm). All interventions were technically successful; during follow-up 1 patient developed recurrent RCC, which was retreated by RFA after embolization. Results.more » No major peri- or postprocedural complications occurred. Changes in creatinine (pre- vs. post-intervention, 122 vs. 127 {mu}mol/l) and calculated creatinine clearance (pre- vs. post-intervention, 78 vs. 73 ml/min) after ablation were minimal. Conclusion. In single kidneys, percutaneous, minimally invasive techniques are safe and feasible. In large tumors, or where there are adjacent critical structures, we prefer a combination of embolization and thermal ablation (RFA)« less