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Title: Myocardial Infarction as a Complication of Bronchial Artery Embolization

Abstract

Bronchial artery embolization is now a common treatment for massive pulmonary hemoptysis if flexible bronchoscopy at the bedside failed to control the bleeding. Complications of this technique range from benign chest pain to devastating neurological impairments. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who developed an ST elevation myocardial infarction during bronchial artery embolization, presumably because of coronary embolism by injected particles. In this patient who had no previously known coronary artery disease, we retrospectively found a communication between the left bronchial artery and the circumflex coronary artery. This fistula was not visible on the initial angiographic view and likely opened because of the hemodynamic changes resulting from the embolization. This case advocates for careful search for bronchial-to-coronary arterial fistulas and the need for repeated angiographic views during embolization procedures.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2]
  1. Université Laval, Department of Medicine (Canada)
  2. Université Laval, Department of Emergency Medicine (Canada)
  3. Université Laval, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645311
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CHEST; CORONARIES; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; PAIN; PATIENTS; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Labbé, Hugo, E-mail: hugo.labbe.1@ulaval.ca, Bordeleau, Simon, Drouin, Christine, and Archambault, Patrick. Myocardial Infarction as a Complication of Bronchial Artery Embolization. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1508-X.
Labbé, Hugo, E-mail: hugo.labbe.1@ulaval.ca, Bordeleau, Simon, Drouin, Christine, & Archambault, Patrick. Myocardial Infarction as a Complication of Bronchial Artery Embolization. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1508-X.
Labbé, Hugo, E-mail: hugo.labbe.1@ulaval.ca, Bordeleau, Simon, Drouin, Christine, and Archambault, Patrick. Wed . "Myocardial Infarction as a Complication of Bronchial Artery Embolization". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1508-X.
@article{osti_22645311,
title = {Myocardial Infarction as a Complication of Bronchial Artery Embolization},
author = {Labbé, Hugo, E-mail: hugo.labbe.1@ulaval.ca and Bordeleau, Simon and Drouin, Christine and Archambault, Patrick},
abstractNote = {Bronchial artery embolization is now a common treatment for massive pulmonary hemoptysis if flexible bronchoscopy at the bedside failed to control the bleeding. Complications of this technique range from benign chest pain to devastating neurological impairments. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who developed an ST elevation myocardial infarction during bronchial artery embolization, presumably because of coronary embolism by injected particles. In this patient who had no previously known coronary artery disease, we retrospectively found a communication between the left bronchial artery and the circumflex coronary artery. This fistula was not visible on the initial angiographic view and likely opened because of the hemodynamic changes resulting from the embolization. This case advocates for careful search for bronchial-to-coronary arterial fistulas and the need for repeated angiographic views during embolization procedures.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-016-1508-X},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 3,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) is the treatment of choice for massive hemoptysis with rare complications that generally are mild and transient. There are few references in the medical literature with acute cerebral embolization as a complication of BAE. We report a case of intracranial posterior territory infarctions as a complication BAE in a patient with hemoptysis due to bronchiectasis.
  • Forty consecutive patients with creatine kinase-MB confirmed myocardial infarction due to circumflex artery occlusion (Group 1) were prospectively evaluated and compared with 107 patients with infarction due to right coronary artery occlusion (Group 2) and 94 with left anterior descending artery occlusion (Group 3). All 241 patients underwent exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy, radionuclide ventriculography, 24 h Holter electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring and coronary arteriography before hospital discharge and were followed up for 39 +/- 18 months. There were no significant differences among the three infarct groups in age, gender, number of risk factors, prevalence and type of prior infarction, Norris index, Killipmore » class and frequency of in-hospital complications. Acute ST segment elevation was present in only 48% of patients in Group 1 versus 71 and 72% in Groups 2 and 3, respectively (p = 0.012), and 38% of patients with a circumflex artery-related infarct had no significant ST changes (that is, elevation or depression) on admission (versus 21 and 20% for patients in Groups 2 and 3, respectively) (p = 0.001). Abnormal R waves in lead V1 were more common in Group 1 than in Group 2 (p less than 0.003) as was ST elevation in leads I, aVL and V4 to V6 (p less than or equal to 0.048). These differences in ECG findings between Group 1 and 2 patients correlated with a significantly higher prevalence of posterior and lateral wall asynergy in the group with a circumflex artery-related infarct. Infarct size based on peak creatine kinase levels and multiple radionuclide variables was intermediate in Group 1 compared with that in Group 2 (smallest) and Group 3 (largest). During long-term follow-up, the probability of recurrent cardiac events was similar in the three infarct groups.« less
  • The objective of this paper is to present an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of patients with massive hemoptysis in whom bronchial and/or nonbronchial systemic arterial embolization is not possible. We describe a percutaneous procedure for pulmonary segmental artery embolization. Between May 2000 and July 2006, 27 adult patients with hemoptysis underwent percutaneous treatment at our department; 20 of 27 patients were embolized via bronchial and or nonbronchial systemic arteries and 7 patients were embolized via pulmonary artery. Femoral arterial access for systemic artery catheterization and femoral vein access for pulmonary arterial catheterization were used. Gelfoam particles and coilsmore » were used for embolization. In this study, we report on three cases of massive hemoptysis from a systemic arterial source in whom bronchial and/or nonbronchial arteries embolization was not possible. Percutaneous embolization via the pulmonary artery access was successful in all three patients. In conclusion, embolization via pulmonary artery is presented as an alternative approach for the management of hemoptysis in patients in whom bronchial arterial embolization is not possible.« less
  • Purpose. To assess the safety and effectiveness of arterial embolization in lung cancer patients with hemoptysis. Methods. Nineteen primary lung cancer patients with hemoptysis underwent bronchial artery and systemic artery embolization from April 2002 to March 2005. There were 17 men and 2 women, with a mean age of 59 years. Histologic analysis revealed squamous cell carcinoma in 10 patients and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in 9 patients. The amount of hemoptysis was bleeding of 25-50 ml within 24 hr in 8 patients, recurrent blood-tinged sputum in 6, and bleeding of 100 ml or more per 24 hr in 5. Embolizationmore » was done with a superselective technique using a microcatheter and polyvinyl alcohol particles to occlude the affected vessels. Results. Arterial embolization was technically successful in all patients and clinically successful in 15 patients (79%). The average number of arteries embolized was 1.2. Bronchial arteriography revealed staining (all patients), dilatation of the artery or hypervascularity (10 patients), and bronchopulmonary shunt (6 patients). The recurrence rate was 33% (5/15) and 11 patients were alive with a mean follow-up time of 148 days (30-349 days). Conclusion. Arterial embolotherapy for hemoptysis in patients with primary lung cancer is an effective, safe therapeutic modality despite the fact the vascular changes are subtle on angiography.« less
  • It has been reported that anastomoses between the bronchial and the coronary arteries can become dilated and functional in certain diseases, provoking angina pectoris through coronary steal syndrome. The condition can be treated with endovascular or surgical management. It is possible that this abnormality may be associated with hemoptysis in patients with parenchymal or vascular disease of the lung but this condition is very rare. We present the coronary CT angiographic findings of bronchial arteries arising from the left coronary artery and their treatment with transcatheter embolization for the control of massive hemoptysis.