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Title: Peripheral Stent Thrombosis Leading to Acute Limb Ischemia and Major Amputation: Incidence and Risk Factors in the Aortoiliac and Femoropopliteal Arteries

Abstract

PurposeTo report the real-world incidence and risk factors of stent thrombosis in the aortoiliac and femoropopliteal arteries in case of bare nitinol stent (BNS) or covered nitinol stent (CNS) placement from a single-centre retrospective audit.Materials and MethodsMedical records of consecutive patients treated with peripheral stent placement for claudication or critical limb ischemia were audited for definite stent thrombosis defined as imaging confirmed stent thrombosis that presented as acute limb-threatening ischemia. Cases were stratified between aortoiliac and femoropopliteal anatomy. Cox regression analysis was employed to adjust for baseline clinical and procedural confounders and identify predictors of stent thrombosis and major limb loss.Results256 patients (n = 277 limbs) were analysed over a 5-year period (2009–2014) including 117 aortoiliac stents (34 CNS; 12.8 ± 5.0 cm and 83 BNS; 7.8 ± 4.0 cm) and 160 femoropopliteal ones (60 CNS; 21.1 ± 11.0 cm and 100 BNS; 17.5 ± 11.9 cm). Median follow-up was 1 year. Overall stent thrombosis rate was 6.1% (17/277) after a median of 43 days (range 2–192 days) and affected almost exclusively the femoropopliteal segment (12/60 in the CNS cohort vs. 4/100 in the BNS; p = 0.001). Annualized stent thrombosis rates (per 100 person-years) were 12.5% in case of CNS and 1.4% in case of BNS (HR 6.3, 95% CI 2.4–17.9; p = 0.0002). Corresponding major amputations rates were 8.7more » and 2.5%, respectively (HR 4.5, 95% CI 2.7–27.9; p = 0.0006). On multivariable analysis, critical leg ischemia and CNS placement were the only predictors of stent thrombosis. Diabetes, critical leg ischemia, femoropopliteal anatomy, long stents and CNS were independent predictors of major amputations.ConclusionsPlacement of long femoropopliteal covered nitinol stents is associated with an increased incidence of acute stent thrombosis and ensuing major amputation. Risks are significantly lower in the aortoiliac vessels and with use of bare nitinol stents.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [4];  [1]
  1. King’s Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Imaging Sciences Division, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom)
  2. The Royal Hospital, Department of Radiology (Oman)
  3. ATTIKO Athens University Hospital, 2nd Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Unit (Greece)
  4. King’s Health Partners, Academic Department of Surgery, Cardiovascular Division, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); Article Copyright (c) 2016 The Author(s); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANATOMY; ARTERIES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; HAZARDS; ISCHEMIA; LEGS; PATIENTS; THROMBOSIS

Citation Formats

Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr, Al-Lamki, Said A. M., Parthipun, Aneeta, Spiliopoulos, Stavros, Patel, Sanjay Dhanji, Paraskevopoulos, Ioannis, Zayed, Hany, and Diamantopoulos, Athanasios. Peripheral Stent Thrombosis Leading to Acute Limb Ischemia and Major Amputation: Incidence and Risk Factors in the Aortoiliac and Femoropopliteal Arteries. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1513-0.
Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr, Al-Lamki, Said A. M., Parthipun, Aneeta, Spiliopoulos, Stavros, Patel, Sanjay Dhanji, Paraskevopoulos, Ioannis, Zayed, Hany, & Diamantopoulos, Athanasios. Peripheral Stent Thrombosis Leading to Acute Limb Ischemia and Major Amputation: Incidence and Risk Factors in the Aortoiliac and Femoropopliteal Arteries. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1513-0.
Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr, Al-Lamki, Said A. M., Parthipun, Aneeta, Spiliopoulos, Stavros, Patel, Sanjay Dhanji, Paraskevopoulos, Ioannis, Zayed, Hany, and Diamantopoulos, Athanasios. Wed . "Peripheral Stent Thrombosis Leading to Acute Limb Ischemia and Major Amputation: Incidence and Risk Factors in the Aortoiliac and Femoropopliteal Arteries". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1513-0.
@article{osti_22645308,
title = {Peripheral Stent Thrombosis Leading to Acute Limb Ischemia and Major Amputation: Incidence and Risk Factors in the Aortoiliac and Femoropopliteal Arteries},
author = {Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr and Al-Lamki, Said A. M. and Parthipun, Aneeta and Spiliopoulos, Stavros and Patel, Sanjay Dhanji and Paraskevopoulos, Ioannis and Zayed, Hany and Diamantopoulos, Athanasios},
abstractNote = {PurposeTo report the real-world incidence and risk factors of stent thrombosis in the aortoiliac and femoropopliteal arteries in case of bare nitinol stent (BNS) or covered nitinol stent (CNS) placement from a single-centre retrospective audit.Materials and MethodsMedical records of consecutive patients treated with peripheral stent placement for claudication or critical limb ischemia were audited for definite stent thrombosis defined as imaging confirmed stent thrombosis that presented as acute limb-threatening ischemia. Cases were stratified between aortoiliac and femoropopliteal anatomy. Cox regression analysis was employed to adjust for baseline clinical and procedural confounders and identify predictors of stent thrombosis and major limb loss.Results256 patients (n = 277 limbs) were analysed over a 5-year period (2009–2014) including 117 aortoiliac stents (34 CNS; 12.8 ± 5.0 cm and 83 BNS; 7.8 ± 4.0 cm) and 160 femoropopliteal ones (60 CNS; 21.1 ± 11.0 cm and 100 BNS; 17.5 ± 11.9 cm). Median follow-up was 1 year. Overall stent thrombosis rate was 6.1% (17/277) after a median of 43 days (range 2–192 days) and affected almost exclusively the femoropopliteal segment (12/60 in the CNS cohort vs. 4/100 in the BNS; p = 0.001). Annualized stent thrombosis rates (per 100 person-years) were 12.5% in case of CNS and 1.4% in case of BNS (HR 6.3, 95% CI 2.4–17.9; p = 0.0002). Corresponding major amputations rates were 8.7 and 2.5%, respectively (HR 4.5, 95% CI 2.7–27.9; p = 0.0006). On multivariable analysis, critical leg ischemia and CNS placement were the only predictors of stent thrombosis. Diabetes, critical leg ischemia, femoropopliteal anatomy, long stents and CNS were independent predictors of major amputations.ConclusionsPlacement of long femoropopliteal covered nitinol stents is associated with an increased incidence of acute stent thrombosis and ensuing major amputation. Risks are significantly lower in the aortoiliac vessels and with use of bare nitinol stents.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-016-1513-0},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 3,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}