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Title: Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Carpal Tunnel Release: Study Upon Clinical Efficacy and Safety

Abstract

ObjectivesTo evaluate the feasibility and 6 months clinical result of sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) and median nerve decompression after ultra-minimally invasive, ultrasound-guided percutaneous carpal tunnel release (PCTR) surgery.MethodsConsecutive patients with carpal tunnel syndrome were enrolled in this descriptive, open-label study. The procedure was performed in the interventional radiology room. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at baseline and 1 month. The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire was administered at baseline, 1, and 6 months.Results129 patients were enrolled. Significant decreases in mean symptom severity scores (3.3 ± 0.7 at baseline, 1.7 ± 0.4 at Month 1, 1.3 ± 0.3 at Month 6) and mean functional status scores (2.6 ± 1.1 at baseline, 1.6 ± 0.4 at Month 1, 1.3 ± 0.5 at Month 6) were noted. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a complete section of all TCL and nerve decompression in 100% of patients. No complications were identified.ConclusionsUltrasound-guided PCTR was used successfully to section the TCL, decompress the median nerve, and reduce self-reported symptoms.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Imagerie Médicale Paris Centre Bachaumont-clinique Blomet RamsayGDS, Department of Interventional Radiology (France)
  2. Gustave Roussy Institute (France)
  3. Association pour la recherche en chirurgie de l’épaule et du coude, clinique Drouot (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645240
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); Article Copyright (c) 2016 The Author(s); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; LIGAMENTS; NERVES; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; SAFETY; SURGERY; SYMPTOMS; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Petrover, David, E-mail: dpetrover@yahoo.fr, Silvera, Jonathan, E-mail: silvera.jonathan@gmail.com, Baere, Thierry De, E-mail: Debaere@igr.fr, Vigan, Marie, E-mail: marie.vigan@gmail.com, and Hakimé, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Carpal Tunnel Release: Study Upon Clinical Efficacy and Safety. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1545-5.
Petrover, David, E-mail: dpetrover@yahoo.fr, Silvera, Jonathan, E-mail: silvera.jonathan@gmail.com, Baere, Thierry De, E-mail: Debaere@igr.fr, Vigan, Marie, E-mail: marie.vigan@gmail.com, & Hakimé, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Carpal Tunnel Release: Study Upon Clinical Efficacy and Safety. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1545-5.
Petrover, David, E-mail: dpetrover@yahoo.fr, Silvera, Jonathan, E-mail: silvera.jonathan@gmail.com, Baere, Thierry De, E-mail: Debaere@igr.fr, Vigan, Marie, E-mail: marie.vigan@gmail.com, and Hakimé, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com. Sat . "Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Carpal Tunnel Release: Study Upon Clinical Efficacy and Safety". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1545-5.
@article{osti_22645240,
title = {Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Carpal Tunnel Release: Study Upon Clinical Efficacy and Safety},
author = {Petrover, David, E-mail: dpetrover@yahoo.fr and Silvera, Jonathan, E-mail: silvera.jonathan@gmail.com and Baere, Thierry De, E-mail: Debaere@igr.fr and Vigan, Marie, E-mail: marie.vigan@gmail.com and Hakimé, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com},
abstractNote = {ObjectivesTo evaluate the feasibility and 6 months clinical result of sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) and median nerve decompression after ultra-minimally invasive, ultrasound-guided percutaneous carpal tunnel release (PCTR) surgery.MethodsConsecutive patients with carpal tunnel syndrome were enrolled in this descriptive, open-label study. The procedure was performed in the interventional radiology room. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at baseline and 1 month. The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire was administered at baseline, 1, and 6 months.Results129 patients were enrolled. Significant decreases in mean symptom severity scores (3.3 ± 0.7 at baseline, 1.7 ± 0.4 at Month 1, 1.3 ± 0.3 at Month 6) and mean functional status scores (2.6 ± 1.1 at baseline, 1.6 ± 0.4 at Month 1, 1.3 ± 0.5 at Month 6) were noted. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a complete section of all TCL and nerve decompression in 100% of patients. No complications were identified.ConclusionsUltrasound-guided PCTR was used successfully to section the TCL, decompress the median nerve, and reduce self-reported symptoms.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-016-1545-5},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 4,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • PurposeTo evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided axillary brachial plexus block (ABPB) for analgesia during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for dialysis access.Subjects and MethodsTwenty-one patients who underwent PTA for stenotic dialysis access shunts and who had previous experience of PTA without sedation, analgesia, and anesthesia were included. The access type in all patients was native arteriovenous fistulae in the forearm. Two radiologists performed US-guided ABPB for the radial and musculocutaneous nerves before PTA. The patients’ pain scores were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) after PTA, and these were compared with previous sessions without US-guided ABPB. Themore » patient’s motor/sensory paralysis after PTA was also examined.ResultsThe mean time required to achieve US-guided ABPB was 8 min. The success rate of this procedure was 100 %, and there were no significant complications. All 21 patients reported lower VAS with US-guided ABPB as compared to without the block (p < 0.01). All patients expressed the desire for an ABPB for future PTA sessions, if required. Transient motor paralysis occurred in 8 patients, but resolved in all after 60 min.ConclusionUS-guided ABPB is feasible and effective for analgesia in patients undergoing PTA for stenotic dialysis access sites.Level of EvidenceLevel 4 (case series).« less
  • In order to shorten the course of direct-acting antiviral agents for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, we examined the antiviral efficacy and safety of 3 weeks of response-guided therapy with an NS3 protease inhibitor and dual NS5A inhibitor–NS5B nucleotide analogue. In this open-label, phase 2a, single centre study, Chinese patients with chronic HCV genotype 1b infection without cirrhosis were randomly allocated by a computer program to one of three treatment groups (sofosbuvir, ledipasvir, and asunaprevir; sofosbuvir, daclatasvir, and simeprevir; or sofosbuvir, daclatasvir, and asunaprevir) until six patients in each group (1:1:1) achieved an ultrarapid virological response (plasma HCV RNAmore » <500 IU/mL by day 2, measured by COBAS TaqMan HCV test, version 2.0). Patients with an ultrarapid virological response received 3 weeks of therapy. Patients who did not achieve an ultrarapid response were switched to sofosbuvir and ledipasvir for either 8 weeks or 12 weeks. Furthermore, the primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with a sustained virological response at 12 weeks (SVR12) after treatment completion, analysed in the intention-to-treat population. All patients who achieved an ultrarapid virological response were included in the safety analysis. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02470858. Between April 5, 2015, and April 15, 2015, 26 eligible patients were recruited. 12 patients were assigned to sofosbuvir, ledipasvir, and asunaprevir; six to sofosbuvir, daclatasvir, and simeprevir; and eight to sofosbuvir, daclatasvir, and asunaprevir. Six patients in each group achieved an ultrarapid virological response (18 [69%]). All patients with an ultrarapid virological response who were given 3 weeks of triple therapy achieved SVR12. The most common adverse events were fatigue (one [17%] of six patients receiving sofosbuvir, ledipasvir, and asunaprevir; one [17%] of six patients receiving sofosbuvir, daclatasvir, and simeprevir; and two [33%] of six patients receiving sofosbuvir, daclatasvir, and asunaprevir) and headache (one [17%] patient in each group). There were no patients who experienced any serious adverse events. In this proof-of-concept study, all patients with chronic HCV without cirrhosis who achieved an ultrarapid virological response on triple direct-acting antiviral regimens by day 2 and received 3 weeks of treatment were cured, with excellent tolerability. By shortening the duration of therapy from the currently recommended 12 weeks to 3 weeks, we could drastically reduce the cost of therapy and the rate of adverse events. Further large-scale studies should be done to confirm our findings.« less
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