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Title: Percutaneous Thermal Ablation with Ultrasound Guidance. Fusion Imaging Guidance to Improve Conspicuity of Liver Metastasis

Abstract

PurposeTo assess whether fusion imaging-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) can improve visibility and targeting of liver metastasis that were deemed inconspicuous on ultrasound (US).Materials and MethodsMWA of liver metastasis not judged conspicuous enough on US was performed under CT/US fusion imaging guidance. The conspicuity before and after the fusion imaging was graded on a five-point scale, and significance was assessed by Wilcoxon test. Technical success, procedure time, and procedure-related complications were evaluated.ResultsA total of 35 patients with 40 liver metastases (mean size 1.3 ± 0.4 cm) were enrolled. Image fusion improved conspicuity sufficiently to allow fusion-targeted MWA in 33 patients. The time required for image fusion processing and tumors’ identification averaged 10 ± 2.1 min (range 5–14). Initial conspicuity on US by inclusion criteria was 1.2 ± 0.4 (range 0–2), while conspicuity after localization on fusion imaging was 3.5 ± 1 (range 1–5, p < 0.001). Technical success rate was 83% (33/40) in intention-to-treat analysis and 100% in analysis of treated tumors. There were no major procedure-related complications.ConclusionsFusion imaging broadens the scope of US-guided MWA to metastasis lacking adequate conspicuity on conventional US. Fusion imaging is an effective tool to increase the conspicuity of liver metastases that were initially deemed non visualizable on conventional US imaging.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Gustave Roussy - Cancer Campus, Interventional Radiology Department (France)
  2. Imagerie Médicale Paris Centre, IMPC (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645218
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ABLATION; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; IMAGES; LIVER; METASTASES; MICROWAVE RADIATION; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS

Citation Formats

Hakime, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com, Yevich, Steven, Tselikas, Lambros, Deschamps, Frederic, Petrover, David, and Baere, Thierry De. Percutaneous Thermal Ablation with Ultrasound Guidance. Fusion Imaging Guidance to Improve Conspicuity of Liver Metastasis. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1561-5.
Hakime, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com, Yevich, Steven, Tselikas, Lambros, Deschamps, Frederic, Petrover, David, & Baere, Thierry De. Percutaneous Thermal Ablation with Ultrasound Guidance. Fusion Imaging Guidance to Improve Conspicuity of Liver Metastasis. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1561-5.
Hakime, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com, Yevich, Steven, Tselikas, Lambros, Deschamps, Frederic, Petrover, David, and Baere, Thierry De. Mon . "Percutaneous Thermal Ablation with Ultrasound Guidance. Fusion Imaging Guidance to Improve Conspicuity of Liver Metastasis". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1561-5.
@article{osti_22645218,
title = {Percutaneous Thermal Ablation with Ultrasound Guidance. Fusion Imaging Guidance to Improve Conspicuity of Liver Metastasis},
author = {Hakime, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com and Yevich, Steven and Tselikas, Lambros and Deschamps, Frederic and Petrover, David and Baere, Thierry De},
abstractNote = {PurposeTo assess whether fusion imaging-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) can improve visibility and targeting of liver metastasis that were deemed inconspicuous on ultrasound (US).Materials and MethodsMWA of liver metastasis not judged conspicuous enough on US was performed under CT/US fusion imaging guidance. The conspicuity before and after the fusion imaging was graded on a five-point scale, and significance was assessed by Wilcoxon test. Technical success, procedure time, and procedure-related complications were evaluated.ResultsA total of 35 patients with 40 liver metastases (mean size 1.3 ± 0.4 cm) were enrolled. Image fusion improved conspicuity sufficiently to allow fusion-targeted MWA in 33 patients. The time required for image fusion processing and tumors’ identification averaged 10 ± 2.1 min (range 5–14). Initial conspicuity on US by inclusion criteria was 1.2 ± 0.4 (range 0–2), while conspicuity after localization on fusion imaging was 3.5 ± 1 (range 1–5, p < 0.001). Technical success rate was 83% (33/40) in intention-to-treat analysis and 100% in analysis of treated tumors. There were no major procedure-related complications.ConclusionsFusion imaging broadens the scope of US-guided MWA to metastasis lacking adequate conspicuity on conventional US. Fusion imaging is an effective tool to increase the conspicuity of liver metastases that were initially deemed non visualizable on conventional US imaging.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-016-1561-5},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 5,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • The purpose of this study was to compare our experience with ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) of renal tumors with results of CT-guided and MRI-guided series in the current literature. Of 90 consecutive renal tumors treated with RFA in 71 patients, 87 lesions were ablated under US guidance. We performed a retrospective analysis of clinical outcome and safety. Results were then compared to published case series where CT and MRI guidances were used exclusively. In our series we had a major complication rate of 4.6%, whereas in CT- and MRI-based series it was 0-12% (mean, 2.2%) and 0-8.3%more » (mean, 4.1%), respectively. During follow-up (1-68 months; mean, 24 months) technical effectiveness was 89.7%, while it was between 89.5% and 96% in CT-guided series and between 91.7% and 100% in MRI-guided series. The size of successfully treated lesions (28 mm) was lower than that of partially-ablated lesions (36 mm; p = 0.004) and only central lesion location proved to be a negative prognostic factor (p = 0.009); in CT-guided series, positive prognostic factors were exophytic growth and size {<=}3 cm. 'Tumor-specific' 2-year survival was 92% in our series, 90-96% in CT-guided series, and not reported in MRI-guided series. In conclusion, despite common beliefs, US guidance in RFA of renal tumors is not less favorable than other guidance techniques. Thus the interventional radiologist can choose his or her preferred technique taking into account personal experience and available equipment.« less
  • PurposeThis study was designed to assess feasibility of US-CT/MRI fusion-guided ablation in liver tumors undetectable with US.MethodsFrom 2002 to 2012, 295 tumors (162 HCCs and 133 metastases; mean diameter 1.3 ± 0.6 cm, range 0.5–2.5 cm) detectable on contrast-enhanced CT/MRI, but completely undetectable with unenhanced US and either totally undetectable or incompletely conspicuous with contrast-enhanced US (CEUS), were treated in 215 sessions using either internally cooled radiofrequency or microwave with standard ablation protocols, guided by an image fusion system (Virtual Navigation System, Esaote S.p.A., Genova, Italy) that combines US with CT/ MRI images. Correct targeting and successful ablation of tumor were verified after 24more » hours with CT or MRI.ResultsA total of 282 of 295 (95.6 %) tumors were correctly targeted with successful ablation achieved in 266 of 295 (90.2 %). Sixteen of 295 (5.4 %) tumors were correctly targeted, but unsuccessfully ablated, and 13 of 295 (4.4 %) tumors were unsuccessfully ablated due to inaccurate targeting. There were no perioperative deaths. Major complications were observed in 2 of the 215 treatments sessions (0.9 %).ConclusionsReal-time virtual navigation system with US-CT/MRI fusion imaging is precise for targeting and achieving successful ablation of target tumors undetectable with US alone. Therefore, a larger population could benefit from ultrasound guided ablation procedures.« less
  • Five hepatocellular carcinomas and one liver metastasis located in the caudate lobe left of the inferior vena cava were successfully treated by radiofrequency (RF) ablation by placing the RF electrode into each tumor through the left lobe of the liver under the CT-fluoroscopic guidance. All tumors were free of enhancement on dynamic contrast-enhanced CT during the mean follow-up period of 6.3 months. There were no major complications related to the procedures.
  • Purpose: Accurate tumor positioning in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of liver lesions is often hampered by motion and setup errors. We combined 3-dimensional ultrasound imaging (3DUS) and active breathing control (ABC) as an image guidance tool. Methods and Materials: We tested 3DUS image guidance in the SBRT treatment of liver lesions for 11 patients with 88 treatment fractions. In 5 patients, 3DUS imaging was combined with ABC. The uncertainties of US scanning and US image segmentation in liver lesions were determined with and without ABC. Results: In free breathing, the intraobserver variations were 1.4 mm in left-right (L-R), 1.6more » mm in superior-inferior (S-I), and 1.3 mm anterior-posterior (A-P). and the interobserver variations were 1.6 mm (L-R), 2.8 mm (S-I), and 1.2 mm (A-P). The combined uncertainty of US scanning and matching (inter- and intraobserver) was 4 mm (1 SD). The combined uncertainty when ABC was used reduced by 1.7 mm in the S-I direction. For the L-R and A-P directions, no significant difference was observed. Conclusion: 3DUS imaging for IGRT of liver lesions is feasible, although using anatomic surrogates in the close vicinity of the lesion may be needed. ABC-based breath-hold in midventilation during 3DUS imaging can reduce the uncertainty of US-based 3D table shift correction.« less
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