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Title: Reduction of Radiation Exposure Using Dynamic Trace Digital Angiography and Spot Fluoroscopy During Adrenal Venous Sampling

Abstract

PurposeTo compare radiation exposure of adrenal venous sampling (AVS) using dynamic trace digital angiography (DTDA) and spot fluoroscopy with that using conventional methods.Materials and MethodsAVS was performed in 11 patients using DTDA and spot fluoroscopy (Group A) and 11 patients using conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with collimation (Group B). Radiation exposure and image quality of adrenal venography using a five-point scale were compared between the groups.ResultsThe acquisition dose–area product (DAP) using DTDA and fluoro-DAP using spot fluoroscopy in Group A were lower than those using conventional DSA (5.3 ± 3.7 vs. 29.1 ± 20.1 Gy cm{sup 2}, p < 0.001) and collimation (33.3 ± 22.9 vs. 59.1 ± 35.7 Gy cm{sup 2}, p = 0.088) in Group B. The total DAP in Group A was significantly lower than that in Group B (38.6 ± 25.9 vs. 88.2 ± 53.6 Gy cm{sup 2}, p = 0.006). The peak skin dose for patients and operator radiation exposure in Group A were significantly lower than those in Group B (403 ± 340 vs. 771 ± 416 mGy, p = 0.030, and 17.1 ± 14.8 vs. 36.6 ± 21.7 μSv, p = 0.013). The image quality of DTDA (4.4 ± 0.6) was significantly higher than that of digital angiography (3.8 ± 0.9, p = 0.011) and equivalent to that of DSA (4.3 ± 0.8, p = 0.651).ConclusionsRadiation exposure during AVS can be reduced by approximately half for both patients and operators by using DTDA and spot fluoroscopy without sacrificing image quality.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Tokyo Women’s Medical University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine (Radiology) (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645214
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BLOOD VESSELS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DOSES; FLUOROSCOPY; IMAGES; PATIENTS; SAMPLING; SKIN; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Morita, Satoru, E-mail: i@imodey.com, Endo, Kenji, Suzaki, Shingo, Ishizaki, Umiko, Yamazaki, Hiroshi, Nishina, Yu, and Sakai, Shuji. Reduction of Radiation Exposure Using Dynamic Trace Digital Angiography and Spot Fluoroscopy During Adrenal Venous Sampling. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1567-7.
Morita, Satoru, E-mail: i@imodey.com, Endo, Kenji, Suzaki, Shingo, Ishizaki, Umiko, Yamazaki, Hiroshi, Nishina, Yu, & Sakai, Shuji. Reduction of Radiation Exposure Using Dynamic Trace Digital Angiography and Spot Fluoroscopy During Adrenal Venous Sampling. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1567-7.
Morita, Satoru, E-mail: i@imodey.com, Endo, Kenji, Suzaki, Shingo, Ishizaki, Umiko, Yamazaki, Hiroshi, Nishina, Yu, and Sakai, Shuji. Mon . "Reduction of Radiation Exposure Using Dynamic Trace Digital Angiography and Spot Fluoroscopy During Adrenal Venous Sampling". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1567-7.
@article{osti_22645214,
title = {Reduction of Radiation Exposure Using Dynamic Trace Digital Angiography and Spot Fluoroscopy During Adrenal Venous Sampling},
author = {Morita, Satoru, E-mail: i@imodey.com and Endo, Kenji and Suzaki, Shingo and Ishizaki, Umiko and Yamazaki, Hiroshi and Nishina, Yu and Sakai, Shuji},
abstractNote = {PurposeTo compare radiation exposure of adrenal venous sampling (AVS) using dynamic trace digital angiography (DTDA) and spot fluoroscopy with that using conventional methods.Materials and MethodsAVS was performed in 11 patients using DTDA and spot fluoroscopy (Group A) and 11 patients using conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with collimation (Group B). Radiation exposure and image quality of adrenal venography using a five-point scale were compared between the groups.ResultsThe acquisition dose–area product (DAP) using DTDA and fluoro-DAP using spot fluoroscopy in Group A were lower than those using conventional DSA (5.3 ± 3.7 vs. 29.1 ± 20.1 Gy cm{sup 2}, p < 0.001) and collimation (33.3 ± 22.9 vs. 59.1 ± 35.7 Gy cm{sup 2}, p = 0.088) in Group B. The total DAP in Group A was significantly lower than that in Group B (38.6 ± 25.9 vs. 88.2 ± 53.6 Gy cm{sup 2}, p = 0.006). The peak skin dose for patients and operator radiation exposure in Group A were significantly lower than those in Group B (403 ± 340 vs. 771 ± 416 mGy, p = 0.030, and 17.1 ± 14.8 vs. 36.6 ± 21.7 μSv, p = 0.013). The image quality of DTDA (4.4 ± 0.6) was significantly higher than that of digital angiography (3.8 ± 0.9, p = 0.011) and equivalent to that of DSA (4.3 ± 0.8, p = 0.651).ConclusionsRadiation exposure during AVS can be reduced by approximately half for both patients and operators by using DTDA and spot fluoroscopy without sacrificing image quality.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-017-1567-7},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 5,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • PurposeTo quantify the arterial flow change during transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using digital subtraction angiography, quantitative color-coding analysis (d-QCA), and real-time subtraction fluoroscopy QCA (f-QCA).Materials and MethodsThis prospective study enrolled 20 consecutive patients with HCC who had undergone TACE via a subsegmental approach between February 2014 and April 2015. The TACE endpoint was a sluggish antegrade tumor-feeding arterial flow. d-QCA and f-QCA were used for determining the relative maximal density time (rT{sub max}) of the selected arteries. The rT{sub max} of the selected arteries was analyzed in d-QCA and f-QCA before and after TACE, and itsmore » correlation in both analyses was evaluated.ResultsThe pre- and post-TACE rT{sub max} of the embolized segmental artery in d-QCA and f-QCA were 1.59 ± 0.81 and 2.97 ± 1.80 s (P < 0.001) and 1.44 ± 0.52 and 2.28 ± 1.02 s (P < 0.01), respectively. The rT{sub max} of the proximal hepatic artery did not significantly change during TACE in d-QCA and f-QCA. The Spearman correlation coefficients of the pre- and post-TACE rT{sub max} of the embolized segmental artery between d-QCA and f-QCA were 0.46 (P < 0.05) and 0.80 (P < 0.001). Radiation doses in one series of d-QCA and f-QCA were 140.7 ± 51.5 milligray (mGy) and 2.5 ± 0.7 mGy, respectively.Conclusionsf-QCA can quantify arterial flow changes with a higher temporal resolution and lower radiation dose. Flow quantification of the embolized segmental artery using f-QCA and d-QCA is highly correlated.« less
  • Radiation exposure to the lens of physicians performing intravenous and hand-injected intraarterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were monitored with and without a combined face and body shield. Shielding provided nearly a three-fold reduction in dose for both intravenous and intraarterial exams, with the highest doses recorded for intraarterial exams due to longer fluoroscopy and exposure during imaging. When compared with the NCRP guidelines of maximum exposure to the lens, an angiographer could theoretically perform up to two intraarterial and 14 intravenous studies per day with protection or one intraarterial and two intravenous studies per day without protection. The exposure valuesmore » in this study reflect our equipment and personal technique in carotid DSA and may not apply to other departments, but should encourage other angiographers to monitor exposure in their own angiography suites.« less
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  • No abstract available.
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