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Title: Why Vascular Surgeons and Interventional Radiologists Collaborate or Compete: A Look at Endovascular Stent Placements

Abstract

PurposeTo understand how cultural differences between vascular surgeons (VSs) and interventional radiologists (IRs) affect their clinical decision making and inter-specialty relationships.MethodsTwenty-four conversational interviews were conducted with IRs and VSs about their approaches to patient care, views of their specialty and others, and solutions to any expressed concerns. Interview transcripts were systematically analyzed to identify and compare key themes according to the constructivist grounded theory and content analysis using NVivo 10 software. These data were supplemented with a retrospective analysis of 3658 endovascular stent placements performed at a large medical academic center over 11 years. Aggregate counts were divided by provider specialty, and trends were assessed via correlation coefficients.ResultsEndovascular stent placements were relatively equally divided between IR and VS over 11 years with some variability from placements by cardiology. IRs tend to lay claim to treatments as masters of procedures, whereas VSs base their claims on being masters of the treated diseases, leading to collaboration in some practices and bitter competition in others. The level of perceived competition was most associated with specialists’ awareness of and appreciation for specialty-specific values rather than differences in practice structure/reimbursement.ConclusionsUnderstanding cultural differences between IRs and VSs is imperative for fostering better collaboration to grow shared territorymore » rather than competing for the same slice of the pie.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1]
  1. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States)
  2. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities (United States)
  3. Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology-Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645183
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; COMPUTER CODES; DECISION MAKING; PATIENTS; THERAPY; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Keller, Eric J., Collins, Jeremy D., Crowley-Matoka, Megan, Chrisman, Howard B., Milad, Magdy P., and Vogelzang, Robert L., E-mail: vogelzang@northwestern.edu. Why Vascular Surgeons and Interventional Radiologists Collaborate or Compete: A Look at Endovascular Stent Placements. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1570-Z.
Keller, Eric J., Collins, Jeremy D., Crowley-Matoka, Megan, Chrisman, Howard B., Milad, Magdy P., & Vogelzang, Robert L., E-mail: vogelzang@northwestern.edu. Why Vascular Surgeons and Interventional Radiologists Collaborate or Compete: A Look at Endovascular Stent Placements. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1570-Z.
Keller, Eric J., Collins, Jeremy D., Crowley-Matoka, Megan, Chrisman, Howard B., Milad, Magdy P., and Vogelzang, Robert L., E-mail: vogelzang@northwestern.edu. Thu . "Why Vascular Surgeons and Interventional Radiologists Collaborate or Compete: A Look at Endovascular Stent Placements". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1570-Z.
@article{osti_22645183,
title = {Why Vascular Surgeons and Interventional Radiologists Collaborate or Compete: A Look at Endovascular Stent Placements},
author = {Keller, Eric J. and Collins, Jeremy D. and Crowley-Matoka, Megan and Chrisman, Howard B. and Milad, Magdy P. and Vogelzang, Robert L., E-mail: vogelzang@northwestern.edu},
abstractNote = {PurposeTo understand how cultural differences between vascular surgeons (VSs) and interventional radiologists (IRs) affect their clinical decision making and inter-specialty relationships.MethodsTwenty-four conversational interviews were conducted with IRs and VSs about their approaches to patient care, views of their specialty and others, and solutions to any expressed concerns. Interview transcripts were systematically analyzed to identify and compare key themes according to the constructivist grounded theory and content analysis using NVivo 10 software. These data were supplemented with a retrospective analysis of 3658 endovascular stent placements performed at a large medical academic center over 11 years. Aggregate counts were divided by provider specialty, and trends were assessed via correlation coefficients.ResultsEndovascular stent placements were relatively equally divided between IR and VS over 11 years with some variability from placements by cardiology. IRs tend to lay claim to treatments as masters of procedures, whereas VSs base their claims on being masters of the treated diseases, leading to collaboration in some practices and bitter competition in others. The level of perceived competition was most associated with specialists’ awareness of and appreciation for specialty-specific values rather than differences in practice structure/reimbursement.ConclusionsUnderstanding cultural differences between IRs and VSs is imperative for fostering better collaboration to grow shared territory rather than competing for the same slice of the pie.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-017-1570-Z},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 6,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of neurointerventional procedures in acute stroke patients performed by a team of vascular interventional radiologists in close cooperation with diagnostic neuroradiologists and stroke neurologists and to compare the results with those of previous reports from centres with specialised interventional neuroradiologists. Material and Methods: A total of 39 patients with acute ischemic stroke due to large-vessel occlusion not responding to or not eligible for intravenous thrombolysis were treated with either intra-arterial thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy (Penumbra System or solitaire FR thrombectomy system, respectively) and included in our prospective study. Outcomes were measured using themore » modified Rankin scale after 90 days, and recanalization was assessed by thrombolysis using the myocardial infarction score. Results: Mean patient age was 68.3 {+-} 14.2 years; the average National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at hospital admission was 17.2 (SD = 6.2 [n = 38]). Successful recanalization was achieved in 74.4 % of patients. Median time from clinical onset to recanalization was 5 h 11 min. Procedure-related complications occurred in 5 % of patients, and 7.5 % had a symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. Of the patients, 22.5 % died within the first 90 postprocedural days, 5 % of these from cerebral causes. Patients who were successfully recanalized had a clinical better outcome at follow-up than those in whom treatment failed. Of the patients, 35.9 % had an mRS score {<=}2 after 90 days. Conclusion: Our results are in line with those in the published literature and show that a treatment strategy with general interventional radiologists performing neurointerventional procedures in acute stroke patients with large vessel occlusions can be achieved to the benefit of patients.« less
  • Purpose: To report the results of covered stent applications in iatrogenic vascular injuries. Methods: We report 17 patients (11 men, 6 women; age range 20-59 years, mean age 40 years) who underwent repair of differentiatrogenic vascular lesions by means of endovascular covered stents.The patient population consisted of 8 femoral arteriovenous fistulae, 4 common femoral artery pseudoaneurysms, 1 subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm, 1 abdominal aortic aneurysm, 1 iliac artery perforation, 2 porto-biliary fistulae that developed during TIPS procedure. Balloon-expandable stent-grafts were used in all patients except one. Control studies were performed with angiography. Results: Technical success was achieved in all 17 patients.Themore » mean clinical follow-up period for all 17 patients was 8 months.There were no signs of stent migration or leaks in the control studies.Only one patient developed a hemodynamically insignificant stenosis at the proximal end of the stent. There have been no stent deformations or related complications during the follow-up period. Conclusion: Our short-term results suggest that endovascular treatment is a low-risk procedure and appears less invasive than surgery for the treatment of different types of iatrogenic vascular injuries. Intermediate and long-term results are not available.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% ofmore » cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; {kappa} = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.« less
  • Purpose: We describe our initial clinical experience in artificial embolization with the Amplatzer Vascular Plug IV (VP IV), a further development of the Vascular Plug family already in routine use. Methods: Results from 50 embolization procedures conducted with the VP IV in 44 patients are summarized. Results: All 50 embolizations were successful, although two required the technique to be modified because of problems with jamming of the screw thread and thus with disconnection of the plug. This was associated with large branching angles. Conclusions: With experience, the VP IV can be used safely and effectively, and it expands the spectrummore » of possible embolizations in interventional radiology. Its greatest disadvantage is its relatively poor positional controllability.« less