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Title: Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Pediatric Patients: To Repair or Not Repair

Abstract

IntroductionPreservation of venous access in children is a major concern in pediatric interventional radiology. If a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) breaks, there are two options: repair the line with a repair kit or exchange the line over a wire in the interventional suite. The purpose of this study is to assess the outcome of PICC repairs in children and to compare these with the outcomes of PICC exchange.Materials and MethodsThis is a single-center, retrospective study of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) following management of externally broken PICCs (2010–2014). The occurrence of CLABSI within 30 days after repair (Group A) or exchange (Group B) of a line was analyzed, as well as PICCs exchanged following an initial and failed repair.ResultsA total of 235 PICC breaks were included in the study, of which 161 were repaired, and 116 of whom were successful (68%, Group A). No repair was performed in 74 PICCs—55/74 of these were exchanged over a wire (74%, Group B), and 19/74 lines were removed. The 30 days post-repair CLABSI rate (Group A) was 2.0 infections per 1000 catheter days, and the calculated risk was 4.3%. In comparison the 30 days post-exchange CLABSI rate (Group B) was 4.0 per 1000 catheter daysmore » and the calculated risk 10.9%. This difference was significant when adjusted for antibiotic use (OR 3.87; 95% CI 1.07–14.0, p = 0.039).ConclusionThe results of this study support repairing a broken PICC instead of removing or replacing the line.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. University of Toronto, Image Guided Therapy, Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children (Canada)
  2. University of Toronto, Child Health Evaluative Sciences (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645178
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANTIBIOTICS; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CHILDREN; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; HAZARDS; PATIENTS; PEDIATRICS; REPAIR; VASCULAR DISEASES; WIRES

Citation Formats

Gnannt, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.gnannt@usz.ch, Patel, Premal, Temple, Michael, Al Brashdi, Yahya, Amaral, Joao, Parra, Dimitri, Rea, Vanessa, Stephens, Derek, and Connolly, Bairbre. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Pediatric Patients: To Repair or Not Repair. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1580-X.
Gnannt, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.gnannt@usz.ch, Patel, Premal, Temple, Michael, Al Brashdi, Yahya, Amaral, Joao, Parra, Dimitri, Rea, Vanessa, Stephens, Derek, & Connolly, Bairbre. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Pediatric Patients: To Repair or Not Repair. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1580-X.
Gnannt, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.gnannt@usz.ch, Patel, Premal, Temple, Michael, Al Brashdi, Yahya, Amaral, Joao, Parra, Dimitri, Rea, Vanessa, Stephens, Derek, and Connolly, Bairbre. Thu . "Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Pediatric Patients: To Repair or Not Repair". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1580-X.
@article{osti_22645178,
title = {Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Pediatric Patients: To Repair or Not Repair},
author = {Gnannt, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.gnannt@usz.ch and Patel, Premal and Temple, Michael and Al Brashdi, Yahya and Amaral, Joao and Parra, Dimitri and Rea, Vanessa and Stephens, Derek and Connolly, Bairbre},
abstractNote = {IntroductionPreservation of venous access in children is a major concern in pediatric interventional radiology. If a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) breaks, there are two options: repair the line with a repair kit or exchange the line over a wire in the interventional suite. The purpose of this study is to assess the outcome of PICC repairs in children and to compare these with the outcomes of PICC exchange.Materials and MethodsThis is a single-center, retrospective study of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) following management of externally broken PICCs (2010–2014). The occurrence of CLABSI within 30 days after repair (Group A) or exchange (Group B) of a line was analyzed, as well as PICCs exchanged following an initial and failed repair.ResultsA total of 235 PICC breaks were included in the study, of which 161 were repaired, and 116 of whom were successful (68%, Group A). No repair was performed in 74 PICCs—55/74 of these were exchanged over a wire (74%, Group B), and 19/74 lines were removed. The 30 days post-repair CLABSI rate (Group A) was 2.0 infections per 1000 catheter days, and the calculated risk was 4.3%. In comparison the 30 days post-exchange CLABSI rate (Group B) was 4.0 per 1000 catheter days and the calculated risk 10.9%. This difference was significant when adjusted for antibiotic use (OR 3.87; 95% CI 1.07–14.0, p = 0.039).ConclusionThe results of this study support repairing a broken PICC instead of removing or replacing the line.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-017-1580-X},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 6,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • PurposeTo determine the incidence and the risks factors of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-related infectious complications.Materials and MethodsMedical charts of every in-patient that underwent a PICC insertion in our hospital between January 2010 and October 2013 were reviewed. All PICC-related infections were recorded and categorized as catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI), exit-site infections, and septic thrombophlebitis.ResultsNine hundred and twenty-three PICCs were placed in 644 unique patients, mostly male (68.3 %) with a median age of 58 years. 31 (3.4 %) PICC-related infections occurred during the study period corresponding to an infection rate of 1.64 per 1000 catheter-days. We observed 27 (87.1 %) CR-BSI, corresponding tomore » a rate of 1.43 per 1000 catheter-days, 3 (9.7 %) septic thrombophlebitis, and 1 (3.2 %) exit-site infection. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a higher PICC-related infection rate with chemotherapy (odds ratio (OR) 7.2–confidence interval (CI) 95 % [1.77–29.5]), auto/allograft (OR 5.9–CI 95 % [1.2–29.2]), and anti-coagulant therapy (OR 2.2–95 % [1.4–12]).ConclusionChemotherapy, auto/allograft, and anti-coagulant therapy are associated with an increased risk of developing PICC-related infections.Clinical AdvanceChemotherapy, auto/allograft, and anti-coagulant therapy are important predictors of PICC-associated infections. A careful assessment of these risk factors may be important for future success in preventing PICC-related infections.« less
  • This report describes a technique of inserting an implantable venous access port (portacath) through a thrombosed and occluded vein employing a pre-existing peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) as the route of access. The PICC was used as a conduit for venous access in a way that has not been described previously in the literature. This procedure was performed in a young patient with cystic fibrosis in an effort to prevent the use of his virgin contralateral veins, which might be used in the future.
  • Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are used for a variety of infusion therapies. They are indicated in patients requiring long-term venous access. Incorrect positioning of the insertion of a PICC line is one of the known complications when inserting the device in clinical practice. Radiographers once performing imaging will commonly check if the tip of a PICC has entered the superior vena cava. This case study will report on a lesser known incorrect placement of a PICC line into the azygous vein and how this can be detected on radiographic imaging. This outcome for the patient can be detrimental asmore » it has an increased risk of perforation, thrombus, and fistula formation.« less
  • Purpose: To assess the incidence of infections and its influence on the survival of radiologically inserted Hickman catheters (HCs) in patients with hematologic disorders and to determine factors associated with premature HC removal. Methods: Survival and complications of 175 HCs in 115 patients were studied retrospectively. To describe the data the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test were used, using the date of HC removal due to HC-related infection as endpoint. A stratified Cox regression model was used to determine explanatory factors. Results: Seventy (40%) HCs were removed prematurely because of proven or probable HC-related infections. The incidence of infectionmore » leading to HC removal was 4.78 per 1000 catheter-days for proven HC infections. Univariate analysis revealed that acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphocytic leukemia, or treatment for these diseases, gender, each subsequent catheter in the same patient and insertion site increased the risk of premature removal of the catheter due to infection. Conclusion: Infection is a major problem in patients with HCs. Unfortunately, the factors associated with increased infection rates that were found in this study cannot be influenced. Further studies are necessary to determine the role of environmental conditions in a radiology suite in relation to the risk of developing a catheter-related infection.« less
  • A transfemoral venous approach is the current standard for accessing malpositioned and fractured central venous catheters (CVCs). The purpose of this study was (1) to describe a transbrachial approach for correction and (2) to assess the success and failure of this method in a pediatric population. A 12-year retrospective review of all patients referred for correction of malpositioned, retained, and fractured CVCs was conducted. Based on the performing interventionalist's preference, transbrachial or transfemoral venous sheaths where placed under ultrasonographic guidance. Diagnostic angiographic catheters and snares were used to manipulate the catheters. Patients who underwent the transfemoral approach received postprocedural monitoringmore » for 4 hours, whereas patients who underwent the transbrachial approach were allowed unrestricted activity immediately after hemostasis was obtained. Technical success of malpositioned lines was defined (1) by final position in the superior vena cava or at the cavoatrial junction on postprocedural imaging or (2) by successful removal of retained catheter fragments, if present. Transbrachial approach was used for access in 11 patients. Problematic lines included malpositioned (n = 10) and retained (n = 1) lines. The ipsilateral arm was used for transbrachial entry in 7 patients. Initial use of angiographic catheters was attempted in 7 cases, of which 4 were successful. All 3 unsuccessful cases had tips positioned in the contralateral brachiocephalic vein, and these were successfully repositioned using snares. A combination of snares and angiographic catheters was used in 2 cases. Snares were used for all other cases. Technical success by way of the transbrachial approach was observed in all cases. Periprocedural follow-up demonstrated no immediate complications. We conclude that the transbrachial approach is a suitable alternative to the transfemoral approach for catheter tip position correction. Tip malposition in the contralateral brachiocephalic vein suggests higher rate of conversion to use of snare devices.« less