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Title: Smartphone Apps as a Source of Information About Interventional Radiology

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ;  [1]
  1. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)
  2. Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurology (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645167
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; DIAGNOSIS; INFORMATION; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Wadhwa, Vibhor, E-mail: vibhorwadhwa90@gmail.com, E-mail: vwadhwa@uams.edu, Jacks, Blake B., E-mail: bjacks@uams.edu, Dubey, Divyanshu, E-mail: divyanshudubey87@gmail.com, Meek, Mary E., E-mail: AthertonMaryE@uams.edu, and Bricco, Diane, E-mail: DDBricco@uams.edu. Smartphone Apps as a Source of Information About Interventional Radiology. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1608-2.
Wadhwa, Vibhor, E-mail: vibhorwadhwa90@gmail.com, E-mail: vwadhwa@uams.edu, Jacks, Blake B., E-mail: bjacks@uams.edu, Dubey, Divyanshu, E-mail: divyanshudubey87@gmail.com, Meek, Mary E., E-mail: AthertonMaryE@uams.edu, & Bricco, Diane, E-mail: DDBricco@uams.edu. Smartphone Apps as a Source of Information About Interventional Radiology. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1608-2.
Wadhwa, Vibhor, E-mail: vibhorwadhwa90@gmail.com, E-mail: vwadhwa@uams.edu, Jacks, Blake B., E-mail: bjacks@uams.edu, Dubey, Divyanshu, E-mail: divyanshudubey87@gmail.com, Meek, Mary E., E-mail: AthertonMaryE@uams.edu, and Bricco, Diane, E-mail: DDBricco@uams.edu. 2017. "Smartphone Apps as a Source of Information About Interventional Radiology". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1608-2.
@article{osti_22645167,
title = {Smartphone Apps as a Source of Information About Interventional Radiology},
author = {Wadhwa, Vibhor, E-mail: vibhorwadhwa90@gmail.com, E-mail: vwadhwa@uams.edu and Jacks, Blake B., E-mail: bjacks@uams.edu and Dubey, Divyanshu, E-mail: divyanshudubey87@gmail.com and Meek, Mary E., E-mail: AthertonMaryE@uams.edu and Bricco, Diane, E-mail: DDBricco@uams.edu},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-017-1608-2},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 6,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Purpose. To describe the current state and limitations to interventional radiology (IR) in Canada through a large, national survey of Canadian interventional radiologists. Methods. An anonymous online survey was offered to members of the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association (CIRA). Only staff radiologists were invited to participate. Results. Seventy-five (75) responses were received from a total of 247, giving a response rate of 30%. Respondents were split approximately equally between academic centers (47%) and community practice (53%), and the majority of interventional radiologists worked in hospitals with either 200-500 (49%) or 500-1,000 (39%) beds. Procedures listed by respondents as most commonlymore » performed in their practice included PICC line insertion (83%), angiography and stenting (65%), and percutaneous biopsy (37%). Procedures listed as not currently performed but which interventional radiologists believed would benefit their patient population included radiofrequency ablation (36%), carotid stenting (34%), and aortic stenting (21%); the majority of respondents noted that a lack of support from referring services was the main reason for not performing these procedures (56%). Impediments to increasing scope and volume of practice in Canadian IR were most commonly related to room or equipment shortage (35%), radiologist shortage (33%), and a lack of funding or administrative support (28%). Conclusion. Interventional radiology in Canada is limited by a number of factors including funding, manpower, and referral support. A concerted effort should be undertaken by individual interventional radiologists and IR organizations to increase training capacity, funding, remuneration, and public exposure to IR in order to help advance the subspecialty.« less
  • Performing an interventional procedure imposes a commitment on interventional radiologists to conduct the initial patient assessment, determine the best course of therapy, and provide long-term care after the procedure is completed. After patient referral, contact with the referring physician and multidisciplinary team approach is vital. In addition, clinical history, physical examination, as well as full understanding of the pre-procedural laboratory results and imaging findings can guide the interventional radiologist to implement the most appropriate management plan, avoid unnecessary procedures, and prevent complications to achieve a successful outcome. We provide a comprehensive, methodical review of pre-procedural care and management in patientsmore » undergoing vascular and interventional radiology procedures.« less
  • Performing an interventional procedure imposes a commitment on interventional radiologists to conduct the initial patient assessment, determine the best course of therapy, and provide long-term care. Patient care before and after an interventional procedure, identification, and management of early and delayed complications of various procedures are equal in importance to the procedure itself. In this second part, we complete the comprehensive, methodical review of pre-procedural care and patient preparation before vascular and interventional radiology procedures.
  • Interventional radiology (IR) has evolved into a full-fledged clinical specialty with attendant patient care responsibilities. Success in IR now requires development of a full clinical practice, including consultations, inpatient admitting privileges, and an outpatient clinic. In addition to technical excellence and innovation, maintaining a comprehensive practice is imperative for interventional radiologists to compete successfully for patients and referral bases. A structured approach to periprocedural care, including routine follow-up and early identification and management of complications, facilitates efficient and thorough management with an emphasis on quality and patient safety.