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Title: Predicting Treatment Response of Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases to Conventional Lipiodol-Based Transarterial Chemoembolization Using Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging: Value of Pretreatment Apparent Diffusion Coefficients (ADC) and ADC Changes Under Therapy

Abstract

PurposeTo use absolute pretreatment apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) derived from diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) to predict response to repetitive cTACE for unresectable liver metastases of colorectal carcinoma (CRLM) at 1 and 3 months after start of treatment.Materials and MethodsFifty-five metastases in 34 patients were examined with DWI prior to treatment and 1 month after initial cTACE. Treatment was performed in 4-week intervals. Response was evaluated at 1 and 3 months after start of therapy. Metastases showing a decrease of ≥30% in axial diameter were classified as responding lesions.ResultsOne month after initial cTACE, seven lesions showed early response. There was no significant difference in absolute pretreatment ADC values between responding and non-responding lesions (p = 0.94). Three months after initial cTACE, 17 metastases showed response. There was a significant difference (p = 0.021) between absolute pretreatment ADC values of lesions showing response (median 1.08 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s) and no response (median 1.30 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s). Pretreatment ADC showed fair diagnostic value to predict response (AUC 0.7). Lesions showing response at 3 months also revealed a significant increase in ADC between measurements before treatment and at one month after initial cTACE (p < 0.001). Applying an increase in ADC of 12.17%, response at 3 months after initial cTACE could be predicted with a sensitivitymore » and specificity of 77 and 74%, respectively (AUC 0.817). Furthermore, there was a strong and significant correlation (r = 0.651, p < 0.001) between percentage change in size after third cTACE and percentage change in ADC.ConclusionIn patients with CRLM, ADC measurements are potential biomarkers for assessing response to cTACE.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)
  2. Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22645163
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANALOG-TO-DIGITAL CONVERTERS; AUC; BIOLOGICAL MARKERS; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CARCINOMAS; CORRELATIONS; DIFFUSION; LIPIODOL; LIVER; METASTASES; PATIENTS; SENSITIVITY; SPECIFICITY; THERAPY; WEIGHT

Citation Formats

Lahrsow, Maximilian, E-mail: mlahrsow@gmail.com, Albrecht, Moritz H., Bickford, Matthew W., and Vogl, Thomas J.. Predicting Treatment Response of Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases to Conventional Lipiodol-Based Transarterial Chemoembolization Using Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging: Value of Pretreatment Apparent Diffusion Coefficients (ADC) and ADC Changes Under Therapy. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1634-0.
Lahrsow, Maximilian, E-mail: mlahrsow@gmail.com, Albrecht, Moritz H., Bickford, Matthew W., & Vogl, Thomas J.. Predicting Treatment Response of Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases to Conventional Lipiodol-Based Transarterial Chemoembolization Using Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging: Value of Pretreatment Apparent Diffusion Coefficients (ADC) and ADC Changes Under Therapy. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1634-0.
Lahrsow, Maximilian, E-mail: mlahrsow@gmail.com, Albrecht, Moritz H., Bickford, Matthew W., and Vogl, Thomas J.. Thu . "Predicting Treatment Response of Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases to Conventional Lipiodol-Based Transarterial Chemoembolization Using Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging: Value of Pretreatment Apparent Diffusion Coefficients (ADC) and ADC Changes Under Therapy". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-017-1634-0.
@article{osti_22645163,
title = {Predicting Treatment Response of Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases to Conventional Lipiodol-Based Transarterial Chemoembolization Using Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging: Value of Pretreatment Apparent Diffusion Coefficients (ADC) and ADC Changes Under Therapy},
author = {Lahrsow, Maximilian, E-mail: mlahrsow@gmail.com and Albrecht, Moritz H. and Bickford, Matthew W. and Vogl, Thomas J.},
abstractNote = {PurposeTo use absolute pretreatment apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) derived from diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) to predict response to repetitive cTACE for unresectable liver metastases of colorectal carcinoma (CRLM) at 1 and 3 months after start of treatment.Materials and MethodsFifty-five metastases in 34 patients were examined with DWI prior to treatment and 1 month after initial cTACE. Treatment was performed in 4-week intervals. Response was evaluated at 1 and 3 months after start of therapy. Metastases showing a decrease of ≥30% in axial diameter were classified as responding lesions.ResultsOne month after initial cTACE, seven lesions showed early response. There was no significant difference in absolute pretreatment ADC values between responding and non-responding lesions (p = 0.94). Three months after initial cTACE, 17 metastases showed response. There was a significant difference (p = 0.021) between absolute pretreatment ADC values of lesions showing response (median 1.08 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s) and no response (median 1.30 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s). Pretreatment ADC showed fair diagnostic value to predict response (AUC 0.7). Lesions showing response at 3 months also revealed a significant increase in ADC between measurements before treatment and at one month after initial cTACE (p < 0.001). Applying an increase in ADC of 12.17%, response at 3 months after initial cTACE could be predicted with a sensitivity and specificity of 77 and 74%, respectively (AUC 0.817). Furthermore, there was a strong and significant correlation (r = 0.651, p < 0.001) between percentage change in size after third cTACE and percentage change in ADC.ConclusionIn patients with CRLM, ADC measurements are potential biomarkers for assessing response to cTACE.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-017-1634-0},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 6,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate whether diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is useful for early detection of the response of hepatic colorectal metastases to hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The subjects were 12 patients with hepatic colorectal metastases. The indwelling catheter for HAIC was placed in the hepatic artery, and 1000 mg/m{sup 2} 5-FU was given repeatedly once a week. DWI was performed before and 9 days after HAIC. The minimum and mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values (minADC and meanADC) were measured. The relative change in ADC values (%ADC) and the relative changemore » in tumor size on follow-up CT after 3 months (reduction ratio) were determined. Liver metastases were divided into two groups, responder and nonresponder. The correlation between %ADC and reduction ratio was determined, and %ADC was compared between the two groups. Eleven patients successfully completed HAIC over the 3-month period; 48 metastatic lesions were evaluated. Positive correlations were observed for relative change between %minADC and reduction ratio (r = 0.709) and between %meanADC and reduction ratio (r = 0.536). Both %minADC and %meanADC were significantly greater in the responder group than in the nonresponder group. With the threshold determined as < 3.5%, the receiver-operating curve analysis showed higher sensitivity and specificity values for %minADC (100% and 92.6%, respectively) than for %meanADC (66.7% and 74.1%, respectively). In conclusion, the relative change in minimum ADC values on DWI may be useful for early detection of the response of liver metastases to HAIC with 5-FU.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) as an early and reproducible change indicator in patients receiving radiotherapy for prostate cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Eight consecutive patients with biopsy-proven PC underwent DWI at 3T. All patients who received external-beam radiotherapy had four serial MR scans, as follows: before therapy (PreTx); after 1 week of therapy (PostT1); after 3 weeks of therapy (PostT2); and 1 month after the completion of therapy (PostT3). At each time, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured in tumors and normal tissues. For reproducibility of the ADC measurement, five patients also had twomore » separate pretreatment DWI scans at an interval of <2 weeks. Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were evaluated at the same time as MR scans. Results: Thirteen tumors (peripheral zone = 10; transition zone = 3) were found. The mean ADC values for the tumors from PreTx to PostT3 were 0.86, 1.03, 1.15, and 1.26 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in sequence, respectively. Compared with PreTx, PostT1 (p = 0.005), PostT2 (p = 0.003), and PostT3 (p < 0.001) showed a significant increase in ADC values. The mean ADC values of the benign tissues from PreTx to PostT3 were 1.60, 1.58, 1.47, and 1.46 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in sequence, respectively. Reproducibility of ADC measurements was confirmed with a mean difference in ADC of -0.04 in peripheral zone and -0.017 in transition zone between two separate pretreatment MR scans. The mean PSA levels from PreTx to PostT3 were 9.05, 9.18, 9.25, and 4.11 ng/mL in sequence, respectively. Conclusions: DWI, as a reproducible biomarker, has the potential to evaluate the early therapeutic changes of PC to radiotherapy.« less
  • PurposeThis phase II prospective study investigates possible benefits of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) combined with hepatic arterial chemoembolization using degradable starch microsphere (DSM) mixed with mitomycin C (MMC) in non-surgical candidates with colorectal liver metastases.Materials and MethodsThis study, approved by the respective institutional review board, included non-surgical candidates with 3 or fewer liver tumors of 3 cm or smaller, or a single lesion 5 cm or smaller. Percutaneous RFA was performed immediately after chemoembolization using DSM-MMC. Primary and secondary endpoints were the local tumor control rate, safety, and 2-year recurrence-free and overall survival rates.ResultsThis study examined 25 patients (22 males, 3 females) withmore » 38 tumors of mean maximum diameter of 2.2 ± 0.9 cm (standard deviation) (range 1.0–4.2 cm). Their mean age was 70.2 ± 8.2 years (range 55–82 years). Local tumor progression developed in 3 tumors (7.9%, 3/38) of 3 patients (12%, 3/25) during the mean follow-up of 34.9 ± 9.2 months (range 18.3–50.1 months). The 2-year local tumor control rates were 92.0% [95% confidence interval (CI), 81.4–100%] on a patient basis and 94.6% (95% CI, 87.3–100%) on a tumor basis. The respective 2-year overall and recurrence-free survival rates were 88.0% (95% CI, 75.3–98.5%) and 63.3% (95% CI, 44.2–82.5%), with median survival time of 48.4 months. Fever was the only adverse event requiring treatments in 2 patients (8%).ConclusionsThis combination therapy is safe, exhibiting strong anticancer effects on colorectal liver metastasis, which might contribute to patient survival.« less
  • The purpose of this study was to assess retrospectively the sequential treatment of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy followed by systemic therapy using oxaliplatin plus 5-flourouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin, namely, FOLFOX, for patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer. We reviewed 20 patients with unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Patients were initially treated with HAI chemotherapy until disease progression (5-fluorouracil, 1000 mg/m{sup 2} intra-arterial infusion, weekly) and then with FOLFOX thereafter (FOLFOX4, n = 13; modified FOLFOX6, n = 7). Adverse events, tumor response, and time to progression for each therapy were evaluated retrospectively, and overall survival was estimated.more » Toxicity of HAI chemotherapy was generally mild. Of 20 patients, adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation occurred in only 1 patient (5%) during initial therapy using HAI chemotherapy, while 9 patients (45%) exhibited adverse events during subsequent FOLFOX therapy. For HAI chemotherapy and FOLFOX, objective response rates were 85.0% and 35.0%, respectively, and median time to progression was 11.6 and 5.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival was 30.1 months. In conclusion, the sequence of HAI chemotherapy followed by FOLFOX is a promising treatment strategy for the long-term use of active chemotherapeutic agents, leading to a superior tumor response and fewer toxic effects in patients with unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer.« less
  • This work describes the installation, use, and quality control (QC) of the alumina-based tungsten-188 ({sup 188}W)/rhenium-188 ({sup 188}Re) generators provided by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In addition, methods used for concentration of the {sup 188}Re-perrhenate bolus and preparation of {sup 188}Re-labeled HDD (4-hexadecyl-2,2,9,9-tetramethyl-4,7-diaza-1,10-decanethiol) for trans-arterial administration for therapy of nonresectable liver cancer also are described. The {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator has a long useful shelf-life of several months and is a convenient on-site {sup 188}Re production system. {sup 188}Re has excellent therapeutic and imaging properties (T{sub 1/2} 16.9 hours; E{beta}{sub max} 2.12 MeV; 155-keV gamma ray, 15%) andmore » is cost effectively obtained on demand by saline elution of the generator. The clinical efficacy of a variety of {sup 188}Re-labeled agents has been demonstrated for several therapeutic applications. Because of the favorable physical properties of {sup 188}Re, several {sup 188}Re-labeled agents are being developed and evaluated for the treatment of nonresectable/refractory liver cancer. {sup 188}Re-labeled HDD has been the most widely studied of these agents for this application and has been introduced into clinical trials at a number of institutions. The trans-arterial administration of {sup 188}Re-labeled agents for treatment of inoperable liver cancer requires use of high-level (1-2 Ci) {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generators. The handling of such high levels of {sup 188}Re imposes radiological precautions normally not encountered in a radiopharmacy and adequate care and ALARA (ie, 'As Low As Reasonably Achievable') principles must be followed. The ORNL generator provides consistently high {sup 188}Re yields (>75%) and low {sup 188}W parent breakthrough (<10{sup -3}%) over an extended shelf-life of several months. However, the high elution volumes (20-40 mL for 1-2 Ci generators) can require concentration of the {sup 188}Re bolus by postelution passage through silver cation chloride trapping columns used in the cost-effective tandem cation/anion column system. The silver column removes the high levels of chloride anion as insoluble AgCl, thus allowing subsequent specific trapping of the perrhenate anion on the small (QMA SeaPak) anion column. This method permits subsequent elution of {sup 188}Re-perrhenate with a small volume of saline, providing a very high activity-concentration solution. Because the {sup 188}Re-specific volume-activity concentration continually decreases with time, the tandem system is especially effective method for extending the useful generator shelf-life. Low elution flow rates (<1 mL/min) minimize any high back pressure which may be encountered during generator/tandem column elution when using tightly packed, small-particle-size commercial columns. In-house preparation of silver cation columns is recommended since the chloride trapping capacity is essentially unlimited, it is inexpensive and not limited in availability to any one supplier, and back pressure can be eliminated by the use of larger particles. Methods for the preparation of {sup 188}Re-HDD have been optimized and this agent can be obtained in high yield (80%).« less