skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Flow Reduction with Adjustable Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Balloon-Expandable Stents Using the “Sheath Control” Technique

Abstract

PurposeA complication of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) placement is refractory portosystemic encephalopathy (PSE) often requiring TIPS reduction. We report the results of a “sheath control technique” utilizing constraining sheaths during deployment of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered balloon-expandable stents, minimizing stent migration, and providing additional procedural control.MethodsTIPS reduction was performed in 10 consecutive patients for PSE using Atrium iCast covered stents (Atrium Maquet Getinge Group, Germany). Within the indwelling TIPS stent, a 9 mm × 59 mm iCast stent was deployed with 2 cm exposed from the sheath’s distal end and the majority of the stent within the sheath to create the distal hourglass shape. During balloon retraction, the stent was buttressed by the sheath. The proximal portion of the stent was angioplastied to complete the hourglass configuration, and the central portion of the stent was dilated to 5 mm. Demographics, pre- and post-procedure laboratory values, and outcomes were recorded.ResultsTen patients underwent TIPS reduction with 100 % technical success. There was no stent migration during stent deployment. All patients experienced initial improvement of encephalopathy. One patient ultimately required complete TIPS occlusion for refractory PSE, and another developed TIPS occlusion 36 days post-procedure. There was no significant trend toward change in patients’ MELD scores immediately post-procedure or at 30 days (p = 0.46, p = 0.47,more » respectively).ConclusionTIPS reduction using Atrium iCast PTFE balloon-expandable stents using the “sheath control technique” is safe and effective, and minimizes the risk of stent migration.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Interventional Radiology Section, Department of Radiology (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642518
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ATRIA; BALLOONS; BYPASSES; HAZARDS; PATIENTS; TEFLON; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Blue, Robert C., E-mail: Robert.c.blue@gmail.com, Lo, Grace C., Kim, Edward, Patel, Rahul S., Scott Nowakowski, F., Lookstein, Robert A., and Fischman, Aaron M. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Flow Reduction with Adjustable Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Balloon-Expandable Stents Using the “Sheath Control” Technique. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-015-1249-2.
Blue, Robert C., E-mail: Robert.c.blue@gmail.com, Lo, Grace C., Kim, Edward, Patel, Rahul S., Scott Nowakowski, F., Lookstein, Robert A., & Fischman, Aaron M. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Flow Reduction with Adjustable Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Balloon-Expandable Stents Using the “Sheath Control” Technique. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-015-1249-2.
Blue, Robert C., E-mail: Robert.c.blue@gmail.com, Lo, Grace C., Kim, Edward, Patel, Rahul S., Scott Nowakowski, F., Lookstein, Robert A., and Fischman, Aaron M. 2016. "Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Flow Reduction with Adjustable Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Balloon-Expandable Stents Using the “Sheath Control” Technique". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-015-1249-2.
@article{osti_22642518,
title = {Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Flow Reduction with Adjustable Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Balloon-Expandable Stents Using the “Sheath Control” Technique},
author = {Blue, Robert C., E-mail: Robert.c.blue@gmail.com and Lo, Grace C. and Kim, Edward and Patel, Rahul S. and Scott Nowakowski, F. and Lookstein, Robert A. and Fischman, Aaron M.},
abstractNote = {PurposeA complication of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) placement is refractory portosystemic encephalopathy (PSE) often requiring TIPS reduction. We report the results of a “sheath control technique” utilizing constraining sheaths during deployment of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered balloon-expandable stents, minimizing stent migration, and providing additional procedural control.MethodsTIPS reduction was performed in 10 consecutive patients for PSE using Atrium iCast covered stents (Atrium Maquet Getinge Group, Germany). Within the indwelling TIPS stent, a 9 mm × 59 mm iCast stent was deployed with 2 cm exposed from the sheath’s distal end and the majority of the stent within the sheath to create the distal hourglass shape. During balloon retraction, the stent was buttressed by the sheath. The proximal portion of the stent was angioplastied to complete the hourglass configuration, and the central portion of the stent was dilated to 5 mm. Demographics, pre- and post-procedure laboratory values, and outcomes were recorded.ResultsTen patients underwent TIPS reduction with 100 % technical success. There was no stent migration during stent deployment. All patients experienced initial improvement of encephalopathy. One patient ultimately required complete TIPS occlusion for refractory PSE, and another developed TIPS occlusion 36 days post-procedure. There was no significant trend toward change in patients’ MELD scores immediately post-procedure or at 30 days (p = 0.46, p = 0.47, respectively).ConclusionTIPS reduction using Atrium iCast PTFE balloon-expandable stents using the “sheath control technique” is safe and effective, and minimizes the risk of stent migration.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-015-1249-2},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 6,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Purpose: To investigate the reproducibility and technical and clinical success of the parallel technique of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) reduction in the management of refractory hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Materials and Methods: A 10-mm-diameter self-expanding stent graft and a 5-6-mm-diameter balloon-expandable stent were placed in parallel inside the existing TIPS in 8 patients via a dual unilateral transjugular approach. Changes in portosystemic pressure gradient and HE grade were used as primary end points. Results: TIPS reduction was technically successful in all patients. Mean {+-} standard deviation portosystemic pressure gradient before and after shunt reduction was 4.9 {+-} 3.6 mmHg (range,more » 0-12 mmHg) and 10.5 {+-} 3.9 mmHg (range, 6-18 mmHg). Duration of follow-up was 137 {+-} 117.8 days (range, 18-326 days). Clinical improvement of HE occurred in 5 patients (62.5%) with resolution of HE in 4 patients (50%). Single episodes of recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurred in 3 patients (37.5%). These were self-limiting in 2 cases and successfully managed in 1 case by correction of coagulopathy and blood transfusion. Two of these patients (25%) died, one each of renal failure and hepatorenal failure. Conclusion: The parallel technique of TIPS reduction is reproducible and has a high technical success rate. A dual unilateral transjugular approach is advantageous when performing this procedure. The parallel technique allows repeat bidirectional TIPS adjustment and may be of significant clinical benefit in the management of refractory HE.« less
  • Purpose. To evaluate prospectively our experience with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) using four different metallic stents. Methods. Between November 1991 and April 1995, 57 patients (41 men and 16 women; age 35-72 years, mean 54 years) underwent the TIPS procedure. Techniques for portal vein localization before and during TIPS were fluoroscopy, computed tomography (CT) studies, wedged hepatic venography, arterial portography, and ultrasound. After predilation we deployed balloon-expandable (n=48) and self-expanding (n=45) metallic stents. Fifteen patients underwent variceal embolization. Initial follow-up angiograms (mean 6.9 months, range 3-24 months) were obtained in 39 of these patients. Results. Fifty-three patients (93%) hadmore » successful TIPS placement. The mean decrease in portal pressure was 42.7%. Besides fluoroscopy, the most helpful techniques for portal vein localization were venography and CT. Residual stenosis (n=1) and late shortening (n=4) of Wallstents resulted in shunt dysfunction. The technical problems encountered with the Palmaz stent resulted from its lack of flexibility. We combined balloon-expandable and self-expanding stents in 12 patients. The 30-day and late follow-up (mean 11.9 months) percutaneous reintervention rates were 11.3% and 64.2%, respectively. There were no clinically significant complications related to the TIPS insertions. Conclusion. An ideal stent does not exist for TIPS, and the authors recommend combining a Palmaz stent with a flexible self-expanding stent.« less
  • Four children, three boys and one girl, with a median age of 9 years 8 months, underwent transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation with an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE)-covered nitinol stent. The stent-graft was successfully placed in all four patients without any complication. Clinical and biochemical improvement was noted in all four patients during follow-up. Radiological follow-up with use of duplex ultrasound showed a recurrent stenosis of the shunt 180 days after stent-graft implantation in one patient. This was treated with placement of an additional stent-graft, re-expanding completely the recurrent stenosis. In the other three patients, the stent-graft remained fully patent untilmore » the end of the study or until orthotopic liver transplantation. These preliminary results suggest that use of the Viatorr ePTFE-covered stent-graft in children is safe and feasible, with potentially the same high patency rate and improved clinical outcome as reported in adult patients.« less
  • We assessed, in a prospective study, the efficacy of multidetector spiral computed tomography (MDCT) in the evaluation of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) patency in patients treated with the Viatorr (Gore, Flagstaff, AZ) expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE)-covered stent-graft. Eighty patients who underwent TIPS procedure using the Viatorr self-expanding e-PTFE stent-graft were evaluated at follow-up of 1, 3, 6, and 12 months with clinical and laboratory tests as well as ultrasound-color Doppler (USCD) imaging. In case of varices, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was also performed. In addition, the shunt was evaluated using MDCT at 6 and 12 months. In all cases of abnormal findingsmore » and discrepancy between MDCT and USCD, invasive control venography was performed. MDCT images were acquired before and after injection of intravenous contrast media on the axial plane and after three-dimensional reconstruction using different algorithms. MDCT was successfully performed in all patients. No artefacts correlated to the Viatorr stent-graft were observed. A missing correlation between UCSD and MDCT was noticed in 20 of 80 (25%) patients. Invasive control venography confirmed shunt patency in 16 (80%) cases and shunt malfunction in 4 (20%) cases. According to these data, MDCT sensitivity was 95.2%; specificity was 96.6%; and positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were 90.9 and 98.2%, respectively. USCD sensitivity was 90%; specificity was 75%; and PPV and NPV were 54.5 and 95.7%, respectively. A high correlation (K value = 0.85) between MDCT and invasive control venography was observed. On the basis of these results, MDCT shows superior sensitivity and specificity compared with USCD in those patients in whom TIPS was performed with the Viatorr stent-graft. MDCT can be considered a valid tool in the follow-up of these patients.« less