skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Comparison of Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (BRTO) Using Ethanolamine Oleate (EO), BRTO Using Sodium Tetradecyl Sulfate (STS) Foam and Vascular Plug-Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (PARTO)

Abstract

PurposeTo compare the clinical outcomes of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) using ethanolamine oleate (EO), BRTO using sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STS) foam, and vascular plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO).Materials and MethodsFrom April 2004 to February 2015, ninety-five patients underwent retrograde transvenous obliteration for gastric varices were analyzed retrospectively. BRTO with EO was performed in 49 patients, BRTO with STS foam in 25, and PARTO in 21. Among them, we obtained follow-up data in 70 patients. Recurrence of gastric varices was evaluated by follow-up endoscopy or CT. Medical records were reviewed for the clinical efficacy. Statistical analyses were performed by Kaplan–Meier method, Chi-square, Fisher’s, and Kruskal–Wallis tests.ResultsTechnical and clinical success was 94.7 %. As major complications, a hemoglobinuria and a death due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) were occurred in two patients with BRTO using EO. Recurrence occurred more frequently in PARTO group (P < 0.05). Recurrence occurred in three patients in BRTO using EO group and four patients in PARTO group with 3.2 and 32.8 % of each expected 1-year recurrence rates. There was no recurrence in BRTO using STS group. Abdominal pain occurred more frequently in BRTO using EO than BRTO using STS foam and PARTO (P < 0.05). Procedure time of PARTO was shortermore » than two conventional BRTOs (P < 0.05).ConclusionsBRTO using STS foam or PARTO is better than BRTO using EO for treatment of gastric varices in terms of complication or procedure time. However, PARTO showed frequent recurrence of gastric varices during the long-term follow-up rather than BRTO.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]; ;  [1]
  1. Keimyung University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Dongsan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)
  2. Daegu Catholic University Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642508
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BALLOONS; CLOSURES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DEATH; FOAMS; MEDICAL RECORDS; PAIN; PATIENTS; REVIEWS; SODIUM; SULFATES

Citation Formats

Kim, Young Hwan, Kim, Young Hwan, E-mail: yhkim68@dsmc.or.kr, Kim, Chan Sun, Kang, Ung Rae, Kim, See Hyung, and Kim, Joo Hwan. Comparison of Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (BRTO) Using Ethanolamine Oleate (EO), BRTO Using Sodium Tetradecyl Sulfate (STS) Foam and Vascular Plug-Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (PARTO). United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-015-1288-8.
Kim, Young Hwan, Kim, Young Hwan, E-mail: yhkim68@dsmc.or.kr, Kim, Chan Sun, Kang, Ung Rae, Kim, See Hyung, & Kim, Joo Hwan. Comparison of Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (BRTO) Using Ethanolamine Oleate (EO), BRTO Using Sodium Tetradecyl Sulfate (STS) Foam and Vascular Plug-Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (PARTO). United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-015-1288-8.
Kim, Young Hwan, Kim, Young Hwan, E-mail: yhkim68@dsmc.or.kr, Kim, Chan Sun, Kang, Ung Rae, Kim, See Hyung, and Kim, Joo Hwan. 2016. "Comparison of Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (BRTO) Using Ethanolamine Oleate (EO), BRTO Using Sodium Tetradecyl Sulfate (STS) Foam and Vascular Plug-Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (PARTO)". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-015-1288-8.
@article{osti_22642508,
title = {Comparison of Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (BRTO) Using Ethanolamine Oleate (EO), BRTO Using Sodium Tetradecyl Sulfate (STS) Foam and Vascular Plug-Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (PARTO)},
author = {Kim, Young Hwan and Kim, Young Hwan, E-mail: yhkim68@dsmc.or.kr and Kim, Chan Sun and Kang, Ung Rae and Kim, See Hyung and Kim, Joo Hwan},
abstractNote = {PurposeTo compare the clinical outcomes of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) using ethanolamine oleate (EO), BRTO using sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STS) foam, and vascular plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO).Materials and MethodsFrom April 2004 to February 2015, ninety-five patients underwent retrograde transvenous obliteration for gastric varices were analyzed retrospectively. BRTO with EO was performed in 49 patients, BRTO with STS foam in 25, and PARTO in 21. Among them, we obtained follow-up data in 70 patients. Recurrence of gastric varices was evaluated by follow-up endoscopy or CT. Medical records were reviewed for the clinical efficacy. Statistical analyses were performed by Kaplan–Meier method, Chi-square, Fisher’s, and Kruskal–Wallis tests.ResultsTechnical and clinical success was 94.7 %. As major complications, a hemoglobinuria and a death due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) were occurred in two patients with BRTO using EO. Recurrence occurred more frequently in PARTO group (P < 0.05). Recurrence occurred in three patients in BRTO using EO group and four patients in PARTO group with 3.2 and 32.8 % of each expected 1-year recurrence rates. There was no recurrence in BRTO using STS group. Abdominal pain occurred more frequently in BRTO using EO than BRTO using STS foam and PARTO (P < 0.05). Procedure time of PARTO was shorter than two conventional BRTOs (P < 0.05).ConclusionsBRTO using STS foam or PARTO is better than BRTO using EO for treatment of gastric varices in terms of complication or procedure time. However, PARTO showed frequent recurrence of gastric varices during the long-term follow-up rather than BRTO.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-015-1288-8},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 6,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • It is unknown whether spontaneous gastrorenal shunts actually develop in the pediatric population. The minimum age documented in studies from Asia is 32 (range 32–44) years. This study describes three pediatric patients undergoing balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) for bleeding gastric varices with two of the three patients undergoing combined partial splenic embolization. The first BRTO is a selective-BRTO via a surgical splenorenal shunt (15 years old) and the other two patients underwent conventional-BRTO via a spontaneous gastrorenal shunt (8 and 14 years old). The recurrent significant bleeding that they exhibited before the combined endovascular therapy did not recur for an averagemore » of 7.1 (range 1.4–14) months. In the second patient, quantitative digitally subtracted angiography was utilized to evaluate the inline portal venous flow before and after BRTO.« less
  • Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are a high-flow form of a vascular malformation, which can be found anywhere in the body. While historically treated surgically, a multidisciplinary approach utilizing multiple specialties and treatment modalities is now commonly employed. In order to effectively treat an AVM, the nidus must be targeted and eradicated, which can be done via multiple approaches. We present the case of a 43-year-old male with a gastric wall AVM, which was initially incompletely treated using a percutaneous transarterial approach. The gastric AVM was noted to have dominant drainage through a gastrorenal shunt; therefore, Balloon-occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (BRTO) wasmore » utilized to eradicate the AVM nidus. This case illustrates the utility of Interventional Radiology, specifically BRTO, as another treatment option for challenging AVMs.« less
  • A 60-year-old woman with massive hemorrhage from duodenal varices was transferred to our hospital for the purpose of transcatheter intervention. Although digital subtraction arterial portography could not depict the entire pathway of collateral circulation, the efferent route of the duodenal varices was clearly demonstrated on subsequent CT during arterial portography. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) of the varices was performed via the efferent vein and achieved complete thrombosis of the varices.
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Purpose. To develop a new coaxial balloon catheter system and evaluate its clinical feasibility for balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO). Methods. A coaxial balloon catheter system was constructed with 9 Fr guiding balloon catheter and 5 Fr balloon catheter. A 5 Fr catheter has a high flexibility and can be coaxially inserted into the guiding catheter in advance. The catheter balloons are made of natural rubber and can be inflated to 2 cm (guiding) and 1 cm (5 Fr) maximum diameter. Between July 2003 and April 2005, 8 consecutive patients (6 men, 2 women; age range 33-72 years, mean agemore » 55.5 years) underwent B-RTO using the balloon catheter system. Five percent ethanolamine oleate iopamidol (EOI) was used as sclerosing agent. The procedures, including maneuverability of the catheter, amount of injected sclerosing agent, necessity for coil embolization of collateral draining veins, and initial clinical results, were evaluated retrospectively. The occlusion rate was assessed by postcontrast CT within 2 weeks after B-RTO. Results. The balloon catheter could be advanced into the proximal potion of the gastrorenal shunt beyond the collateral draining vein in all cases. The amount of injected EOI ranged from 3 to 34 ml. Coil embolization of the collateral draining vein was required in 2 cases. Complete obliteration of gastric varices on initial follow-up CT was obtained in 7 cases. The remaining case required re-treatment that resulted in complete obstruction of the varices after the second B-RTO. No procedure-related complications were observed. Conclusion. B-RTO using the new coaxial balloon catheter is feasible. Gastric varices can be treated more simply by using this catheter system.« less