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Title: Long-Term Efficacy of Percutaneous Internal Plastic Stent Placement for Non-anastomotic Biliary Stenosis After Liver Transplantation

Abstract

PurposeWe aimed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of percutaneous management of non-anastomotic biliary stenosis after liver transplantation, using plastic internal biliary stents.Materials and MethodsThis study included 35 cases (28 men, 7 women; mean age: 52.09 ± 8.13 years, range 34–68) in 33 patients who needed repeated interventional procedures because of biliary strictures. After classification of the biliary strictures, we inserted percutaneous biliary plastic stents through the T-tube or percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage tracts. Stents were exchanged according to percutaneous methods at regular 2- to 6-month intervals. The stents were removed if the condition improved, as observed on cholangiogram as well as based on clinical findings. The median patient follow-up period after initial diagnosis and treatment was 6.04 years (range 0.29–9.95 years). We assessed treatment success rate and patient and graft survival times.ResultsDuring the follow-up period, 14 patients (14/33, 42.42 %) were successfully treated and were tube-free. The median tube-free time, time without a stent, was 4.13 years (range 1.00–9.01). In contrast, internal plastic stents remained in 9 patients (9/33, 27.27 %) until the last follow-up. These patients had acceptable hepatic function. Among the remaining 10 patients, 3 (3/33, 9.09 %) were lost to regular follow-up and the other 7 (7/33, 21.21 %) patients died. The overall graft loss rate wasmore » 20.0 % (7/35). The median time from initial treatment to graft loss was 1.84 years (range 0.42–4.25).ConclusionsPercutaneous plastic stents placement is technically feasible and clinically useful in patients with multiple biliary stenoses following liver transplantation.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [1]; ; ;  [3]
  1. Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)
  2. Chung-Ang University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of)
  3. Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642504
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; DIAGNOSIS; DRAINAGE; GRAFTS; LIVER; PATIENTS

Citation Formats

Lee, Eun Sun, E-mail: seraph377@gmail.com, Han, Joon Koo, E-mail: hanjk@snu.ac.kr, Baek, Ji-Hyun, E-mail: 100paper@gmail.com, Suh, Suk-Won, E-mail: bomboy1@hanmail.net, Joo, Ijin, E-mail: hijijin@gmail.com, Yi, Nam-Joon, E-mail: gsleenj@hanmail.net, Lee, Kwang-Woong, E-mail: kwleegs@gmail.com, and Suh, Kyung-Suk, E-mail: kssuh@snu.ac.kr. Long-Term Efficacy of Percutaneous Internal Plastic Stent Placement for Non-anastomotic Biliary Stenosis After Liver Transplantation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1297-2.
Lee, Eun Sun, E-mail: seraph377@gmail.com, Han, Joon Koo, E-mail: hanjk@snu.ac.kr, Baek, Ji-Hyun, E-mail: 100paper@gmail.com, Suh, Suk-Won, E-mail: bomboy1@hanmail.net, Joo, Ijin, E-mail: hijijin@gmail.com, Yi, Nam-Joon, E-mail: gsleenj@hanmail.net, Lee, Kwang-Woong, E-mail: kwleegs@gmail.com, & Suh, Kyung-Suk, E-mail: kssuh@snu.ac.kr. Long-Term Efficacy of Percutaneous Internal Plastic Stent Placement for Non-anastomotic Biliary Stenosis After Liver Transplantation. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1297-2.
Lee, Eun Sun, E-mail: seraph377@gmail.com, Han, Joon Koo, E-mail: hanjk@snu.ac.kr, Baek, Ji-Hyun, E-mail: 100paper@gmail.com, Suh, Suk-Won, E-mail: bomboy1@hanmail.net, Joo, Ijin, E-mail: hijijin@gmail.com, Yi, Nam-Joon, E-mail: gsleenj@hanmail.net, Lee, Kwang-Woong, E-mail: kwleegs@gmail.com, and Suh, Kyung-Suk, E-mail: kssuh@snu.ac.kr. Wed . "Long-Term Efficacy of Percutaneous Internal Plastic Stent Placement for Non-anastomotic Biliary Stenosis After Liver Transplantation". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1297-2.
@article{osti_22642504,
title = {Long-Term Efficacy of Percutaneous Internal Plastic Stent Placement for Non-anastomotic Biliary Stenosis After Liver Transplantation},
author = {Lee, Eun Sun, E-mail: seraph377@gmail.com and Han, Joon Koo, E-mail: hanjk@snu.ac.kr and Baek, Ji-Hyun, E-mail: 100paper@gmail.com and Suh, Suk-Won, E-mail: bomboy1@hanmail.net and Joo, Ijin, E-mail: hijijin@gmail.com and Yi, Nam-Joon, E-mail: gsleenj@hanmail.net and Lee, Kwang-Woong, E-mail: kwleegs@gmail.com and Suh, Kyung-Suk, E-mail: kssuh@snu.ac.kr},
abstractNote = {PurposeWe aimed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of percutaneous management of non-anastomotic biliary stenosis after liver transplantation, using plastic internal biliary stents.Materials and MethodsThis study included 35 cases (28 men, 7 women; mean age: 52.09 ± 8.13 years, range 34–68) in 33 patients who needed repeated interventional procedures because of biliary strictures. After classification of the biliary strictures, we inserted percutaneous biliary plastic stents through the T-tube or percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage tracts. Stents were exchanged according to percutaneous methods at regular 2- to 6-month intervals. The stents were removed if the condition improved, as observed on cholangiogram as well as based on clinical findings. The median patient follow-up period after initial diagnosis and treatment was 6.04 years (range 0.29–9.95 years). We assessed treatment success rate and patient and graft survival times.ResultsDuring the follow-up period, 14 patients (14/33, 42.42 %) were successfully treated and were tube-free. The median tube-free time, time without a stent, was 4.13 years (range 1.00–9.01). In contrast, internal plastic stents remained in 9 patients (9/33, 27.27 %) until the last follow-up. These patients had acceptable hepatic function. Among the remaining 10 patients, 3 (3/33, 9.09 %) were lost to regular follow-up and the other 7 (7/33, 21.21 %) patients died. The overall graft loss rate was 20.0 % (7/35). The median time from initial treatment to graft loss was 1.84 years (range 0.42–4.25).ConclusionsPercutaneous plastic stents placement is technically feasible and clinically useful in patients with multiple biliary stenoses following liver transplantation.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-016-1297-2},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 6,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • PurposeEvaluation of long-term outcomes of venoplasty and Gianturco stents to treat inferior vena cava (IVC) obstruction after liver transplantation.MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed records from 33 consecutive adult patients referred with the intent to treat suspected IVC obstruction after liver transplantation. Treatment was performed for occlusion or stenosis with a gradient exceeding 3 mmHg. The primary treatment was venoplasty and, if refractory, Gianturco stent placement. Recurrence prompted repeat venoplasty or stent placement.ResultsOf the 33 patients, 25 (aged 46.9 ± 12.2 years) required treatment at a mean of 2.3 years (14 days to 20.3 years) after transplantation. For technically successful cases, primary treatment was venoplasty alone (14) or with stentmore » placement (10). Technical success was 96 % (24 of 25) reflecting failure to cross one occlusion. Clinical success was 88 % (22 of 25) reflecting the technical failure and two that died of unrelated complications within 5 weeks. Cumulative primary patencies were 57.1 % at 6 months (n = 21) and 51.4 % at 1 (n = 10), 3 (n = 7), 5 (n = 6), and 7 (n = 5) years. Cumulative primary assisted patency was 95.2 % at 6 months (n = 21) and at 1 (n = 15), 3 (n = 9), 5 (n = 8), and 7 (n = 8) years. The 17 patients stented for refractory (n = 10) or recurrent (n = 7) stenosis had cumulative primary and primary assisted patencies of 86.0 and 100 %, respectively, from 6 months (n = 14) to 7 years (n = 3). No major complications occurred; one fractured stent was observed after 11.6 years.ConclusionFor IVC obstruction following liver transplantation, excellent long-term outcomes can be achieved by venoplasty and Gianturco stent placement.« less
  • PurposeTo estimate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous ePTFE-covered biliary stent placement and the relationship between underlying liver function and stent patency in patients with malignant hilar obstruction.Materials and MethodsFrom March 2012 to June 2015, 41 patients [22 females, 19 males; mean age 69.8 (range 34–94) years] with malignant biliary obstruction underwent percutaneous biliary stent placement (31 patients with unilateral, 10 patients with bilateral side-by-side). Cumulative patient survival and stent patency rate curves were derived using the Kaplan–Meier method. A Cox model was used to explore the relationship between liver function and patient survival, and also biliary stent patency. Pearsonmore » correlation coefficient was used to analyze the relationship between patient survival and stent patency.ResultsTechnical success rate was 100 % and clinical success rate was 95 %. During follow-up, four complications occurred (two bilomas and two cases of acute cholecystitis) and were treated successfully with percutaneous drainage. No other complication occurred. Mean serum bilirubin level was 11.34 ± 7.35 mg/dL before drainage and 5.00 ± 4.83 mg/dL 2 weeks after stent placement. The median patent survival duration was 147 days (95 % CI, 69.6–224.4 days). The median stent patency duration was 101 days (95 % CI, 70.0–132.0 days). The cumulative stent patency rates at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months were 97, 57.6, 30.3, and 17.0 %, respectively. Child–Pugh score was correlated significantly with patient survival (P = 0.011) and stent patency (P = 0.007). MELD score was correlated significantly with stent patency (P = 0.044). There was a correlation between patient survival and stent patency (r = 0.778, P < 0.001).ConclusionPercutaneous placement of ePTFE-covered biliary stent was a safe and an effective method for malignant biliary obstruction. Underlying liver function seemed to be one of the important factors affecting patient survival and stent patency, and stent patency showed statistically significant correlation with patient survival.« less
  • PurposeTo evaluate long-term results of stent placement retrospectively in patients with outflow block after living-donor-liver transplantation (LDLT).Materials and MethodsFor this institutional review board approved retrospective study conducted during 2002–2012, stents were placed in outflow veins in 15 patients (11.3 %, 15/133) (12 men; 3 female) in whom outflow block developed after LDLT. Their mean age was 52.3 years ± 15.3 (SD) (range, 4–69 years). Venous stenosis with a pressure gradient ≥5 mmHg (outflow block) was observed in the inferior vena cava in seven patients, hepatic vein in seven patients, and both in one patient. Technical success, change in a pressure gradient and clinical manifestations, and complicationsmore » were evaluated. Overall survival of 15 patients undergoing outflow block stenting was compared with that of 116 patients without outflow block after LDLT.ResultsStents were placed across the outflow block veins without complications, lowering the pressure gradient ≤ 3 mmHg in all patients (100 %, 15/15). Clinical manifestations improved in 11 patients (73.3 %, 11/15), and all were discharged from the hospital. However, they did not improve in the other 4 patients (26.7 %, 4/15) who died in the hospital 1.0–3.7 months after stenting (mean, 2.0 ± 1.2 months). No significant difference in 5-year survival rates was found between patients with and without outflow block after LDLT (61.1 vs. 72.2 %, p = .405).ConclusionStenting is a feasible, safe, and useful therapeutic option to resolve outflow block following LDLT, providing equal survival to that of patients without outflow block.« less
  • Biliary reconstruction continues to be a major source of morbidity following liver transplantation. The spectrum of biliary complications is evolving due to the increasing number of split-liver and living-donor liver transplantation, which are even associated with a higher incidence of biliary complications. Bile duct strictures are the most common cause of late biliary complications and account for up to 40% of all biliary complications. Optimal therapy for posttransplantation anastomotic biliary strictures remains uncertain and requires a multidisciplinary approach. We report the case of a 54-year-old Caucasian male affected by hepatocarcinoma and hepatitis C-related cirrhosis who underwent right-lobe living-donor liver transplantationmore » from his son complicated by double anastomotic stenosis of the main right hepatic duct and of an accessory biliary duct draining segments 6 and 7 of the graft that was successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography with long-term subcutaneous placement of two internal Ruesch-type biliary stents.« less
  • PurposeThis study was designed o evaluate outcomes of percutaneous management of anastomotic ureteral strictures in renal transplants using nephroureteral stents with or without balloon dilatation.MethodsA retrospective audit of 1,029 consecutive renal transplants was performed. Anastomotic ureteral strictures were divided into two groups: nephroureteral stent only (NUS) and NUS+PTA (nephroureteral stent plus percutaneous transluminal angioplasty), with each cohort subdivided into early versus late presentation (obstructive uropathy occurring <90 day or >90 days from transplant, respectively). Overall and 6-month technical success were defined as removal of NUS any time with <30 % residual stenosis (any time lapse less or more than 6 months) and at >6 months,more » respectively. Patency was evaluated from NUS removal to last follow-up for both groups and compared.ResultsSixty-seven transplant patients with 70 ureteric anastomotic strictures (6.8 %, n = 70/1,029) underwent 72 percutaneous treatments. 34 % were late (>90 days, n = 24/70), and 66 % were early (<90 days, n = 46/70). Overall technical success was 82 % (n = 59/72) and 6-month success was 58 % (n = 42/72). Major and minor complications were 2.8 % (n = 2/72), and 12.5 % (n = 9/72). NUS+PTA did not improve graft survival (p = 0.354) or patency (p = 0.9) compared with NUS alone. There was no difference in graft survival between treated and nontreated groups (p = 0.74).ConclusionsThere is no advantage to PTA in addition to placement of NUS, although PTA did not negatively impact graft survival or long-term patency and both interventions were safe and effective. Neither the late or early groups benefited from PTA in addition to NUS. Earlier obstructions showed greater improvement in serum creatinine than later obstructions.« less