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Title: Reply: Which is the Best Chemotherapeutic Agent for Transarterial Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma?

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of Burgundy, Department of Vascular, Oncologic and Interventional Radiology, François-Mitterrand Teaching Hospital, LE2I UMR CNRS 6306, Arts et Métiers (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642498
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CHEMOTHERAPY; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; HEPATOMAS; THERAPEUTIC USES; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Favelier, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.favelier@chu-dijon.fr, Pottecher, Pierre, Estivalet, Louis, and Loffroy, Romaric. Reply: Which is the Best Chemotherapeutic Agent for Transarterial Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma?. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1320-7.
Favelier, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.favelier@chu-dijon.fr, Pottecher, Pierre, Estivalet, Louis, & Loffroy, Romaric. Reply: Which is the Best Chemotherapeutic Agent for Transarterial Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma?. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1320-7.
Favelier, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.favelier@chu-dijon.fr, Pottecher, Pierre, Estivalet, Louis, and Loffroy, Romaric. 2016. "Reply: Which is the Best Chemotherapeutic Agent for Transarterial Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma?". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1320-7.
@article{osti_22642498,
title = {Reply: Which is the Best Chemotherapeutic Agent for Transarterial Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma?},
author = {Favelier, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.favelier@chu-dijon.fr and Pottecher, Pierre and Estivalet, Louis and Loffroy, Romaric},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-016-1320-7},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 6,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • No abstract prepared.
  • PurposeTo retrospectively elucidate the preliminary clinical impact of warmed miriplatin-lipiodol suspension (MPT-LPD) when used as a chemotherapeutic agent for transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Materials and MethodsBetween June and December 2010, TACE was performed with MPT-LPD at room temperature (RT group), and after January 2011, TACE with MPT-LPD warmed to 40 Degree-Sign C was performed (W group). The intraarterial appearance of MPT-LPD immediately after injection through microcatheters at the second-order branches was compared between the two groups with a 5-point grading system. Local therapeutic effects of HCCs as assessed by follow-up computed tomography (CT) obtained 1-3 months after TACEmore » were compared between the groups with a 4-point grading system (TE1-TE4). After April 2011, angiography-assisted CT was routinely performed at TACE, and HCCs that revealed apparent corona enhancement (CE) were retrospectively selected. The degree of concordance between CE and MPT-LPD accumulation as assessed by CT immediately after TACE was assessed with a 3-point grading scale.ResultsMPT-LPD therapy resulted in a smooth and continuous appearance in the W group (grades 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 were, respectively, 1, 2, 11, 18, and 4) compared to the RT group (4, 0, 1, 2, and 0). The W group (TE1, TE2, TE3, and TE4 were 1, 9, 11, and 12) revealed better local therapeutic effects than the RT group (6, 3, 9, and 0) (p < 0.05). CE was found in 26 HCC nodules, and concordance between CE and MPT-LPD accumulation was observed in 66 % (grades 1, 2, and 3 were, respectively, 2, 8, and 19).ConclusionWarmed MPT-LPD flowed more smoothly within vascular lumen, passed through tumor sinusoid of HCC, and had better local therapeutic effects at short-term observation than MPT-LPD at room temperature.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the efficacy of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) using cisplatin as a second-line treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) unresponsive to TACE using epirubicin-Lipiodol emulsion at our institution. Materials and Methods: Between January 2006 and March 2009, 51 patients with unresectable HCC underwent TACE using cisplatin. All patients had shown persistent viable tumor or tumor progression after at least 2 sessions of TACE using epirubicin-Lipiodol emulsion. TACE procedures consisted of arterial injection of a mixture of Lipiodol and cisplatin (30-100 mg [mean 57 {+-} 21]) (n = 29) or arterial infusion ofmore » cisplatin (30-100 mg [mean 87 {+-} 19]) solution (n = 22) followed by injection of 1-mm porous gelatin particles. Early tumor response was assessed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria. Overall survival and progression-free survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was assessed according to NCI-CTCAE version 3 criteria. Results: Response rates were 11.8 and 27.5% by RECIST and EASL criteria, respectively. Overall survival rates were 61.9, 48.2, and 28.9% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively, and the median survival time was 15.4 months. Progression-free survival rate was 35.2% at 1 year, and median progression-free survival time was 3.1 months. No major complications were observed, and the occurrence of postembolization syndrome was minimal. Grade 3 to 4 toxicities included thrombocytopenia (5.8%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (AST) level (35.3%), and increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level (23.5%). Conclusions: witching the TACE anticancer drug from epirubicin to cisplatin might be the feasible option for advanced HCC, even when considered resistant to the initial form of TACE.« less
  • Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the safety of chemotherapeutic infusion or chemoembolization by way of the cystic artery in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) supplied exclusively by the cystic artery. Methods: Between Jan 2002 and Dec 2011, we performed chemotherapeutic infusion or chemoembolization using iodized oil for the treatment of 27 patients with HCC supplied exclusively by the cystic artery. Computed tomography (CT) scans, digital subtraction angiograms, and medical records were retrospectively reviewed by consensus. Results: The cystic artery originated from the main right hepatic artery in 24 (89 %) patients, from the right anterior hepatic artery inmore » 2 (7 %) patients, and from the left hepatic artery in 1 (4 %) patient. Selective catheterization of the cystic artery was achieved in all patients. Superselection of tumor-feeding vessels from the cystic artery was achieved in 7 patients (26 %). Chemotherapeutic infusion was performed in 18 patients (67 %), and chemoembolization was performed in 9 patients (33 %). There were no major complications and only 2 minor complications, including vasovagal syncope and nausea with vomiting. Individual tumor response supplied exclusively by the cystic artery at the follow-up enhanced CT scan were complete response (n = 16), partial response (n = 3), and stable disease (n = 8). Conclusion: HCC supplied exclusively by the cystic artery can be safely treated without severe complications by chemotherapeutic infusion or chemoembolization using iodized oil through the cystic artery.« less