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Title: Abscopal Effects and Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

Abstract

We present the case of an 80-year-old male with squamous cell carcinoma with bilobar hepatic metastases who underwent targeted Yttrium-90 radioembolization of the right hepatic lobe lesion. Subsequently, there was complete regression of the nontargeted, left hepatic lobe lesion. This may represent the first ever reported abscopal effect in radioembolization. The abscopal effect refers to the phenomenon of tumor response in nontargeted sites after targeted radiotherapy. In this article, we briefly review the immune-mediated mechanisms responsible for the abscopal effect.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. University Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States)
  2. Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642495
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARCINOMAS; LIVER; MALES; METASTASES; RADIOEMBOLIZATION; REVIEWS; YTTRIUM; YTTRIUM 90

Citation Formats

Ghodadra, Anish, Bhatt, Sumantha, Camacho, Juan C., and Kim, Hyun S., E-mail: kevin.kim@yale.edu. Abscopal Effects and Yttrium-90 Radioembolization. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-015-1259-0.
Ghodadra, Anish, Bhatt, Sumantha, Camacho, Juan C., & Kim, Hyun S., E-mail: kevin.kim@yale.edu. Abscopal Effects and Yttrium-90 Radioembolization. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-015-1259-0.
Ghodadra, Anish, Bhatt, Sumantha, Camacho, Juan C., and Kim, Hyun S., E-mail: kevin.kim@yale.edu. Fri . "Abscopal Effects and Yttrium-90 Radioembolization". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-015-1259-0.
@article{osti_22642495,
title = {Abscopal Effects and Yttrium-90 Radioembolization},
author = {Ghodadra, Anish and Bhatt, Sumantha and Camacho, Juan C. and Kim, Hyun S., E-mail: kevin.kim@yale.edu},
abstractNote = {We present the case of an 80-year-old male with squamous cell carcinoma with bilobar hepatic metastases who underwent targeted Yttrium-90 radioembolization of the right hepatic lobe lesion. Subsequently, there was complete regression of the nontargeted, left hepatic lobe lesion. This may represent the first ever reported abscopal effect in radioembolization. The abscopal effect refers to the phenomenon of tumor response in nontargeted sites after targeted radiotherapy. In this article, we briefly review the immune-mediated mechanisms responsible for the abscopal effect.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-015-1259-0},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 7,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Jul 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: In Yttrium-90 (90Y) radioembolization, non-target embolization (NTE) to the stomach or small bowel can result in ulceration, a rare but difficult to manage clinical complication. However, dosimetric thresholds for toxicity to these tissues from radioembolization have never been evaluated in a controlled setting. We performed an analysis of the effect of 90Y radioembolization in a porcine model at different absorbed-dose endpoints. Methods: Under approval of the University of Tennessee IACUC, 6 female pigs were included in this study. Animals underwent transfemoral angiography and infusion of calibrated dosages of 90Y resin microspheres into arteries supplying part of the gastric wall.more » A 99mTc-MAA simulation study was performed first to determine perfused tissue volume for treatment planning along with contrast-enhanced CT. The pigs were monitored for side effects for 9 weeks, after which time they were euthanized and their upper gastrointestinal tracts were harvested for analysis. Results: 90Y radioembolization was infused resulting in average absorbed doses of between 35.5 and 91.9 Gy to the gastric wall. No animal exhibited any signs of pain or gastrointestinal distress through the duration of the study. Excised tissue showed 1–2 small (<3.0 cm2) healed or healing superficial gastric lesions in 5 out of 6 animals. Histologic analysis demonstrated that lesion location was superficial to areas of abnormally high microsphere deposition. An analysis of microsphere deposition patterns within the gastric wall indicated a high preference for submucosal deposition. Dosimetric evaluation at the luminal mucosa performed based on microsphere deposition patterns confirmed that 90Y dosimetry techniques conventionally used in hepatic dosimetry provide a reasonable estimate of absorbed dose. Conclusion: The upper gastrointestinal tract may be less sensitive to 90Y radioembolization than previously thought. Lack of charged-particle equilibrium at the luminal mucosa may contribute to decreased toxicity of 90Y radioembolization compared to external-beam radiation therapy in gastrointestinal tissue. This project was supported by SIRTex Medical Ltd.« less
  • Purpose: To standardize the indications, techniques, multimodality treatment approaches, and dosimetry to be used for yttrium-90 (Y90) microsphere hepatic brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Members of the Radioembolization Brachytherapy Oncology Consortium met as an independent group of experts in interventional radiology, radiation oncology, nuclear medicine, medical oncology, and surgical oncology to identify areas of consensus and controversy and to issue clinical guidelines for Y90 microsphere brachytherapy. Results: A total of 14 recommendations are made with category 2A consensus. Key findings include the following. Sufficient evidence exists to support the safety and effectiveness of Y90 microsphere therapy. A meticulous angiographic technique ismore » required to prevent complications. Resin microsphere prescribed activity is best estimated by the body surface area method. By virtue of their training, certification, and contribution to Y90 microsphere treatment programs, the disciplines of radiation oncology, nuclear medicine, and interventional radiology are all qualified to use Y90 microspheres. The panel strongly advocates the creation of a treatment registry with uniform reporting criteria. Initiation of clinical trials is essential to further define the safety and role of Y90 microspheres in the context of currently available therapies. Conclusions: Yttrium-90 microsphere therapy is a complex procedure that requires multidisciplinary management for safety and success. Practitioners and cooperative groups are encouraged to use these guidelines to formulate their treatment and dose-reporting policies.« less
  • The treatment of hepatic tumors remains unsatisfactory. These lesions receive most of their blood supply from the hepatic artery, therefore the hepatic artery administration of beta-emitting particulate radiopharmaceuticals is an attractive approach to deliver therapeutic irradiation to the liver and differentially to tumors within the liver. A Phase 1 dose escalation study of the hepatic tolerance to radiation delivered by {sup 90}Y containing glass microspheres was carried out in 24 patients with hepatic malignancy. Doses of {sup 90}Y microspheres to achieve an estimated whole-liver nominal absorbed radiation dose of 5000 cGy (two patients), 7500cGy (six patients), 10,000 cGy (seven patients),more » 12,500 cGy (six patients), and 15,000 cGy (three patients) were administered via the hepatic artery. The administered nominal absorbed radiation dose (NARD) was estimated based on liver volume determined from CT scans and the assumption of uniform distribution of microspheres throughout the liver. No hematologic, hepatic or pulmonary toxicity was encountered in the dose range examined during a mean follow-up period of up to 53 mo. Reversible gastritis or duodenitis was encountered in four patients without imaging or biopsy evidence for extra-hepatic deposition of microspheres. Response data, based on CT scans obtained 16 wk after treatment, showed progressive disease in eight patients, stable disease in seven patients, minimal response in four patients and partial response in five patients. Subsequent follow-up revealed three long-term survivors at 204, 216 and 228 wk. These preliminary data demonstrates that in the examined dose range, radiation may be safely delivered to liver tumors by means of {sup 90}Y glass microspheres with encouraging response data. 39 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • The purpose of our study was to determine if preferential radiographic tumor response occurs in tumors located in posterior versus anterior liver segments following radioembolization with yttrium-90 glass microspheres. One hundred thirty-seven patients with chemorefractory liver metastases of various primaries were treated with yttrium-90 glass microspheres. Of these, a subset analysis was performed on 89 patients who underwent 101 whole-right-lobe infusions to liver segments V, VI, VII, and VIII. Pre- and posttreatment imaging included either triphasic contrast material-enhanced CT or gadolinium-enhanced MRI. Responses to treatment were compared in anterior versus posterior right lobe lesions using both RECIST and WHO criteria.more » Statistical comparative studies were conducted in 42 patients with both anterior and posterior segment lesions using the paired-sample t-test. Pearson correlation was used to determine the relationship between pretreatment tumor size and posttreatment tumor response. Median administered activity, delivered radiation dose, and treatment volume were 2.3 GBq, 118.2 Gy, and 1,072 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Differences between the pretreatment tumor size of anterior and posterior liver segments were not statistically significant (p = 0.7981). Differences in tumor response between anterior and posterior liver segments were not statistically significant using WHO criteria (p = 0.8557). A statistically significant correlation did not exist between pretreatment tumor size and posttreatment tumor response (r = 0.0554, p = 0.4434). On imaging follow-up using WHO criteria, for anterior and posterior regions of the liver, (1) response rates were 50% (PR = 50%) and 45% (CR = 9%, PR = 36%), and (2) mean changes in tumor size were -41% and -40%. In conclusion, this study did not find evidence of preferential radiographic tumor response in posterior versus anterior liver segments treated with yttrium-90 glass microspheres.« less
  • Infectious complications after yttrium-90 (y-90) radioembolization of hepatic tumors are rare. Most reports describe hepatic abscesses as complications of other locoregional therapies, such as transcatheter arterial embolization or chemoembolization. These usually occur in patients with a history of biliary intervention and present several weeks after treatment. We report a case of hepatic abscess formed immediately after y-90 radioembolization of a hepatic metastasis in a patient who had no history of previous biliary instrumentation.