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Title: Radiologic Percutaneous Gastrostomy in Nondistended Stomach: A Modified Approach

Abstract

IntroductionGastrostomy tube placement for patients requiring long-term nutritional support may be performed using different techniques including endoscopic, surgical, and percutaneous radiologically guided methods. Radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG), typically performed when percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is not possible, requires proper gastric distension that is achieved by insufflating air through a nasogastric tube. We describe a simple technique to prevent air escape from the stomach during gastrostomy tube placement. To the best of our knowledge, this technique has not yet been described in the literature.Materials and MethodsFour patients with unsuccessful percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy were referred for fluoroscopic-guided gastrostomy. One patient had a pyriform sinus tumor and three had an ischemic stroke causing dysphagia. Gastric distention was not achieved in the patients due to air escaping into the bowel during the standard RIG procedure. A modified approach using a balloon catheter inflated in the pylorus to avoid air passing into the duodenum permitted successful RIG.ResultsThe modified RIG procedure was successfully carried out in all cases without complications.DiscussionInadequate air distension of the stomach is an unusual event that causes a failure of gastrostomy tube placement and an increased risk of both major and minor complications. The use of a balloon catheter inflated in the firstmore » part of the duodenum prevents the air passage into the bowel allowing the correct positioning of the gastrostomy.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. IRCCS San Martino University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642489
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BALLOONS; FAILURES; HAZARDS; ISCHEMIA; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; SINUSES; SMALL INTESTINE; STOMACH; SURGERY; THERAPY

Citation Formats

Petrocelli, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.petrocelli@hsanmartino.it, Salsano, Giancarlo, E-mail: giancarlo.salsano@yahoo.it, Bovio, Giulio, E-mail: giulio.bovio@hsanmartino.it, Camerano, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.camerano@gmail.com, Utili, Alice, E-mail: aliceutili@gmail.com, and Ferro, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.ferro@hsanmartino.it. Radiologic Percutaneous Gastrostomy in Nondistended Stomach: A Modified Approach. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1304-7.
Petrocelli, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.petrocelli@hsanmartino.it, Salsano, Giancarlo, E-mail: giancarlo.salsano@yahoo.it, Bovio, Giulio, E-mail: giulio.bovio@hsanmartino.it, Camerano, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.camerano@gmail.com, Utili, Alice, E-mail: aliceutili@gmail.com, & Ferro, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.ferro@hsanmartino.it. Radiologic Percutaneous Gastrostomy in Nondistended Stomach: A Modified Approach. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1304-7.
Petrocelli, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.petrocelli@hsanmartino.it, Salsano, Giancarlo, E-mail: giancarlo.salsano@yahoo.it, Bovio, Giulio, E-mail: giulio.bovio@hsanmartino.it, Camerano, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.camerano@gmail.com, Utili, Alice, E-mail: aliceutili@gmail.com, and Ferro, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.ferro@hsanmartino.it. 2016. "Radiologic Percutaneous Gastrostomy in Nondistended Stomach: A Modified Approach". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-016-1304-7.
@article{osti_22642489,
title = {Radiologic Percutaneous Gastrostomy in Nondistended Stomach: A Modified Approach},
author = {Petrocelli, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.petrocelli@hsanmartino.it and Salsano, Giancarlo, E-mail: giancarlo.salsano@yahoo.it and Bovio, Giulio, E-mail: giulio.bovio@hsanmartino.it and Camerano, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.camerano@gmail.com and Utili, Alice, E-mail: aliceutili@gmail.com and Ferro, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.ferro@hsanmartino.it},
abstractNote = {IntroductionGastrostomy tube placement for patients requiring long-term nutritional support may be performed using different techniques including endoscopic, surgical, and percutaneous radiologically guided methods. Radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG), typically performed when percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is not possible, requires proper gastric distension that is achieved by insufflating air through a nasogastric tube. We describe a simple technique to prevent air escape from the stomach during gastrostomy tube placement. To the best of our knowledge, this technique has not yet been described in the literature.Materials and MethodsFour patients with unsuccessful percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy were referred for fluoroscopic-guided gastrostomy. One patient had a pyriform sinus tumor and three had an ischemic stroke causing dysphagia. Gastric distention was not achieved in the patients due to air escaping into the bowel during the standard RIG procedure. A modified approach using a balloon catheter inflated in the pylorus to avoid air passing into the duodenum permitted successful RIG.ResultsThe modified RIG procedure was successfully carried out in all cases without complications.DiscussionInadequate air distension of the stomach is an unusual event that causes a failure of gastrostomy tube placement and an increased risk of both major and minor complications. The use of a balloon catheter inflated in the first part of the duodenum prevents the air passage into the bowel allowing the correct positioning of the gastrostomy.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-016-1304-7},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 7,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • Purpose: To compare the results and costs of three different means of achieving direct percutaneous gastroenteric access. Methods: Three groups of patients received the following procedures: fluoroscopically guided percutaneous gastrostomy/gastrojejunostomy (FPG, n= 42); percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy/gastrojejunostomy (PEG, n= 45); and surgical endoscopic gastrostomy/gastrojejunostomy (SEG, n= 34). Retrospective review of the medical records was performed to evaluate indications for the procedure, procedure technical success, and outcome. Estimated costs were compared for each of the three procedures, using a combination of charges and materials costs. Results: Technical success was greater for FPG and SEG (100% each) than for PEG (84%, p= 0.008more » vs FPG and p= 0.02 vs SEG). All patients (n= 7) who failed PEG subsequently underwent successful FPG. Success in placing a gastrojejunostomy was 91% for FPG, and estimated at 43% for PEG and 0 for SEG. Complications did not differ in frequency among groups. For gastrostomy, the average cost per successful tube was lowest in the PEG group ($1862, p= 0.02); FPG averaged $1985, and SEG $3694. SEG costs significantly more than FPG or PEG (p= 0.0001). For gastrojejunostomy, FPG averaged $2201, PEG $3158, and SEG $3045. Conclusion: Technical success for gastrostomy is higher for FPG and SEG than PEG. Though PEG is the least costly procedure, the difference is modest compared with FPG. For gastrojejunostomy, FPG offers the highest technical success rate and lowest cost. Due to high costs associated with the operating room, SEG should be reserved for those patients undergoing a concurrent surgical procedure.« less
  • The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a flat-detector C-arm-guided radiographic technique (cone-beam computed tomography [CBCT]) for percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) insertion. Eighteen patients (13 men and 5 women; mean age 62 years) in whom percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) had failed underwent CBCT-guided PRG insertion. PEG failure or unsuitability was caused by upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction in all cases. Indications for gastrostomy were esophageal and head and neck malignancies, respectively. Before the PRG procedure, initial C-arm CBCT scans were acquired. Three- and 2-dimensional soft-tissue reconstructions of the epigastrium region were generated on a dedicated workstation. Subsequently,more » gastropexy was performed with T-fasteners after CBCT-guided puncture of the stomach bubble, followed by insertion of an 14F balloon-retained catheter through a peel-away introducer. Puncture of the stomach bubble and PRG insertion was technically successful in all patients without alteration of the epigastric region. There was no malpositioning of the tube or other major periprocedural complications. In 2 patients, minor complications occurred during the first 30 days of follow-up (PRG malfunction: n = 1; slight infection: n = 1). Late complications, which were mainly tube disturbances, were observed in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 212 days. CBCT-guided PRG is a safe, well-tolerated, and successful method of gastrostomy insertion in patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy is not feasible. CBCT provides detailed imaging of the soft tissue and surrounding structures of the epigastric region in one diagnostic tour and thus significantly improves the planning of PRG procedures.« less
  • PurposeThe purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous gastrostomy for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC).Materials and MethodsThis retrospective study included patients with HNC who had undergone CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy between February 2007 and December 2013. Information regarding the patients’ backgrounds, CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy techniques, technical success rate, and AEs were obtained from the medical records. In all patients, the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy with a Funada gastropexy device.ResultsDuring the study period, 177 patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy. The most common tumor locationmore » was the oral cavity, followed by the pharynx and maxilla. The indication for CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy were tumor obstruction in 78 patients, postoperative dysphagia in 55 patients, radiation edema in 43 patients, and cerebral infarction in 1 patient. The technical success rate was 97.7 %. The overall mean procedure time was 25.3 min. Major AEs occurred in seven patients (4.0 %), including bleeding (n = 4), colonic injury (n = 1), gastric tear (n = 1), and aspiration pneumonia (n = 1). Minor AEs occurred in 15 patients (8.5 %), which included peristomal leakage (n = 6), irritation (n = 4), inadvertent removal (n = 2), peristomal hemorrhage (n = 1), peristomal infection (n = 1), and wound granulation (n = 1). The mean follow-up period was 111 days (range 1–1106 days).ConclusionOur study suggests that CT-guided gastrostomy may be suitable in patients with HNC.« less
  • Radiologic inserted gastrostomy (RIG) is the preferred method in our institution for enteral feeding in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Skin-level primary-placed mushroom cage gastrostomy tubes become tight with weight gain. We describe a minimally invasive radiologic technique for replacing mushroom gastrostomy tubes with endoscopic mushroom cage tubes in ALS. All patients with ALS who underwent replacement of a RIG tube were included. Patients were selected for a modified replacement when the tube length of the primary placed RIG tube was insufficient to allow like-for-like replacement. Replacement was performed under local anesthetic and fluoroscopic guidance according to a preset technique, withmore » modification of an endoscopic mushroom cage gastrostomy tube to allow percutaneous placement. Assessment of the success, safety, and durability of the modified technique was undertaken. Over a 60-month period, 104 primary placement mushroom cage tubes in ALS were performed. A total of 20 (19.2%) of 104 patients had a replacement tube positioned, 10 (9.6%) of 104 with the modified technique (male n = 4, female n = 6, mean age 65.5 years, range 48-85 years). All tubes were successfully replaced using this modified technique, with two minor complications (superficial wound infection and minor hemorrhage). The mean length of time of tube durability was 158.5 days (range 6-471 days), with all but one patient dying with a functional tube in place. We have devised a modification to allow percutaneous replacement of mushroom cage gastrostomy feeding tubes with minimal compromise to ALS patients. This technique allows tube replacement under local anesthetic, without the need for sedation, an important consideration in ALS.« less
  • Purpose: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is not possible or fails in some patients. We aimed to categorize the reasons for PEG failure, to study the success of percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) in these patients, and to highlight the associated technical difficulties and complications.Methods: Forty-two patients (28 men, 14 women; mean age 60 years, range 18-93 years) in whom PEG failed or was not possible, underwent PRG. PEG failure or unsuitability was due to upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction or other pathology precluding PEG in 15 of the 42 patients, suboptimal transillumination in 22 of 42 patients, and advanced cardiorespiratory decompensation precludingmore » endoscopy in five of 42 patients. T-fastener gastropexy was used in all patients and 14-18 Fr catheters were inserted.Results: PRG was successful in 41 of 42 patients (98%). CT guidance was required in four patients with altered upper gastrointestinal anatomy. PRG failed in one patient despite CT guidance. In the 16 patients with high subcostal stomachs who failed PEG because of inadequate transillumination, intercostal tube placement was required in three and cephalad angulation under the costal margin in six patients. Major complications included inadvertent placement of the tube in the peritoneal cavity. There was one case of hemorrhage at the gastrostomy site requiring transfusion and one case of superficial gastrostomy site infection requiring tube removal. Minor complications included superficial wound infection in six patients, successfully treated with routine wound toilette.Conclusion: We conclude that PRG is a safe, well-tolerated and successful method of gastrostomy and gastrojejunostomy insertion in the technically difficult group of patients who have undergone an unsuccessful PEG. In many such cases optimal clinical evaluation will suggest primary referral for PRG as the preferred option.« less