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Title: SU-F-T-157: Physics Considerations Regarding Dosimetric Accuracy of Analytical Dose Calculations for Small Field Proton Therapy: A Monte Carlo Study

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of dose calculations by analytical dose calculation methods (ADC) for small field proton therapy in a gantry based passive scattering facility. Methods: 50 patients with intra-cranial disease were evaluated in the study. Treatment plans followed standard prescription and optimization procedures of proton stereotactic radiosurgery. Dose distributions calculated with the Monte Carlo (MC) toolkit TOPAS were used to represent delivered treatments. The MC dose was first adjusted using the output factor (OF) applied clinically. This factor is determined from the field size and the prescribed range. We then introduced a normalization factor to measure the difference in mean dose between the delivered dose (MC dose with OF) and the dose calculated by ADC for each beam. The normalization was determined by the mean dose of the center voxels of the target area. We compared delivered dose distributions and those calculated by ADC in terms of dose volume histogram parameters and beam range distributions. Results: The mean target dose for a whole treatment is generally within 5% comparing delivered dose (MC dose with OF) and ADC dose. However, the differences can be as great as 11% for shallow and small target treated with a thick range compensator.more » Applying the normalization factor to the MC dose with OF can reduce the mean dose difference to less than 3%. Considering range uncertainties, the generally applied margins (3.5% of the prescribed range + 1mm) to cover uncertainties in range might not be sufficient to guarantee tumor coverage. The range difference for R90 (90% distal dose falloff) is affected by multiple factors, such as the heterogeneity index. Conclusion: This study indicates insufficient accuracy calculating proton doses using ADC. Our results suggest that uncertainties of target doses are reduced using MC techniques, improving the dosimetric accuracy for proton stereotactic radiosurgery. The work was supported by NIH/NCI under CA U19 021239. CG was partially supported by the Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11475087).« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)
  2. (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642398
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Geng, C, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Daartz, J, Cheung, K, Bussiere, M, Shih, H, Paganetti, H, and Schuemann, J. SU-F-T-157: Physics Considerations Regarding Dosimetric Accuracy of Analytical Dose Calculations for Small Field Proton Therapy: A Monte Carlo Study. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956293.
Geng, C, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Daartz, J, Cheung, K, Bussiere, M, Shih, H, Paganetti, H, & Schuemann, J. SU-F-T-157: Physics Considerations Regarding Dosimetric Accuracy of Analytical Dose Calculations for Small Field Proton Therapy: A Monte Carlo Study. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956293.
Geng, C, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Daartz, J, Cheung, K, Bussiere, M, Shih, H, Paganetti, H, and Schuemann, J. 2016. "SU-F-T-157: Physics Considerations Regarding Dosimetric Accuracy of Analytical Dose Calculations for Small Field Proton Therapy: A Monte Carlo Study". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956293.
@article{osti_22642398,
title = {SU-F-T-157: Physics Considerations Regarding Dosimetric Accuracy of Analytical Dose Calculations for Small Field Proton Therapy: A Monte Carlo Study},
author = {Geng, C and Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing and Daartz, J and Cheung, K and Bussiere, M and Shih, H and Paganetti, H and Schuemann, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of dose calculations by analytical dose calculation methods (ADC) for small field proton therapy in a gantry based passive scattering facility. Methods: 50 patients with intra-cranial disease were evaluated in the study. Treatment plans followed standard prescription and optimization procedures of proton stereotactic radiosurgery. Dose distributions calculated with the Monte Carlo (MC) toolkit TOPAS were used to represent delivered treatments. The MC dose was first adjusted using the output factor (OF) applied clinically. This factor is determined from the field size and the prescribed range. We then introduced a normalization factor to measure the difference in mean dose between the delivered dose (MC dose with OF) and the dose calculated by ADC for each beam. The normalization was determined by the mean dose of the center voxels of the target area. We compared delivered dose distributions and those calculated by ADC in terms of dose volume histogram parameters and beam range distributions. Results: The mean target dose for a whole treatment is generally within 5% comparing delivered dose (MC dose with OF) and ADC dose. However, the differences can be as great as 11% for shallow and small target treated with a thick range compensator. Applying the normalization factor to the MC dose with OF can reduce the mean dose difference to less than 3%. Considering range uncertainties, the generally applied margins (3.5% of the prescribed range + 1mm) to cover uncertainties in range might not be sufficient to guarantee tumor coverage. The range difference for R90 (90% distal dose falloff) is affected by multiple factors, such as the heterogeneity index. Conclusion: This study indicates insufficient accuracy calculating proton doses using ADC. Our results suggest that uncertainties of target doses are reduced using MC techniques, improving the dosimetric accuracy for proton stereotactic radiosurgery. The work was supported by NIH/NCI under CA U19 021239. CG was partially supported by the Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11475087).},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956293},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: In small field geometries, the electronic equilibrium can be lost, making it challenging for the dose-calculation algorithm to accurately predict the dose, especially in the presence of tissue heterogeneities. In this study, dosimetric accuracy of Monte Carlo (MC) advanced dose calculation and sequential algorithms of Multiplan treatment planning system were investigated for small radiation fields incident on homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. Methods: Small open fields of fixed cones of Cyberknife M6 unit 100 to 500 mm2 were used for this study. The fields were incident on in house phantom containing lung, air, and bone inhomogeneities and also homogeneous phantom.more » Using the same film batch, the net OD to dose calibration curve was obtained using CK with the 60 mm fixed cone by delivering 0- 800 cGy. Films were scanned 48 hours after irradiation using an Epson 1000XL flatbed scanner. The dosimetric accuracy of MC and sequential algorithms in the presence of the inhomogeneities was compared against EBT3 film dosimetry Results: Open field tests in a homogeneous phantom showed good agreement between two algorithms and film measurement For MC algorithm, the minimum gamma analysis passing rates between measured and calculated dose distributions were 99.7% and 98.3% for homogeneous and inhomogeneous fields in the case of lung and bone respectively. For sequential algorithm, the minimum gamma analysis passing rates were 98.9% and 92.5% for for homogeneous and inhomogeneous fields respectively for used all cone sizes. In the case of the air heterogeneity, the differences were larger for both calculation algorithms. Overall, when compared to measurement, the MC had better agreement than sequential algorithm. Conclusion: The Monte Carlo calculation algorithm in the Multiplan treatment planning system is an improvement over the existing sequential algorithm. Dose discrepancies were observed for in the presence of air inhomogeneities.« less
  • Purpose: Gold nanoparticle (GNP) is a promising radiosensitizer that selectively boosts tumor dose in radiotherapy. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging observations recently revealed for the first time that GNP exists in vivo in the form of highly localized vesicles, instead of hypothetical uniform distribution. This work investigates the corresponding difference of energy deposition in proton therapy. Methods: First, single vesicles of various radii were constructed by packing GNPs (as Φ50 nm gold spheres) in spheres and were simulated, as well as a single GNP. The radial energy depositions (REDs) were scored using 100 concentric spherical shells from 0.1µm to 10µm,more » 0.1µm thickness each, for both vesicles and GNP, and compared. TEM images, 8 days after injection in a PC3 prostate cancer murine model, were used to extract position/dimension of vesicles, as well as contours of cytoplasmic and nucleus membranes. Vesicles were then constructed based on the TEM images. A 100 MeV proton beam was studied by using the Geant4-DNA code, which simulates all energy deposition events. Results: The vesicle REDs, normalized to the same proton energy loss as in a single GNP, are larger (smaller) than that of a single GNP when radius >2µm (<2µm). The peak increase (at about 3µm radius) is about 10% and 18% for Φ1µm and Φ1.6µm vesicles respectively, relative to a single GNP. The TEM-based simulation resulted in a larger energy deposition (by about one order of magnitude) that follows completely different pattern from that of hypothetical GNP distributions (regular dotted pattern in extracellular and/or extranucleus regions). Conclusion: The in vivo energy deposition, both in pattern and magnitude, of proton therapy is greatly affected by the true distribution of the GNP, as illustrated by the presence of GNP vesicles compared to hypothetical scenarios. Work supported by NSERC Discovery Grant #435510, Canada.« less
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