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Title: SU-F-T-141: Proton Dose Validation in a Phantom Beyond TRUFILL N-BCA Embolization Glue

Abstract

Purpose: To validate the treatment planning system predicted proton dose beyond a heterogeneity (n-BCA glue) by making a measurement in a custom acrylic phantom. Methods: A custom cubic acrylic phantom was designed for this experiment. A container was designed to fit in the phantom. This container was filled with TRUFILL™ n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate(n-BCA) glue. When the container was placed in the phantom, its center was at a distance of 7.4cm from the entrance. This depth allows us to make measurements around the center of modulation of a 126 MeV proton beam with a 3cm spread-out-Bragg peak. To make measurements at other beam energies, additional acrylic can be added in front of the phantom, to adjust the depth of the heterogeneity. A diamond detector was cross calibrated against a standard cylindrical ion chamber in a 126MeV beam. The diamond detector was then used to make dose measurements beyond the inhomogeneity. The measurement was repeated with the container filled with water. Several measurements were made at each setup, to check reproducibility of measurements. Results: For the same number of Tic3R1 counts, the dose measured with the diamond detector beyond n-BCA glue was 1.053 times the dose measured beyond the water filled container. Thismore » result is in agreement with the measured stopping power of glue (1.06). These measurements were in agreement with the dose predicted by the treatment planning system when the electron density of the heterogeneity was replaced with 1.06 before the dose calculation. Conclusion: Our initial measurements validate the dose predicted by our treatment plan in the presence of heterogeneity in a phantom. The material tested (n-BCA glue) is commonly used in the treatment of AVM’s prior to an SRS treatment. An error in dose predicted by the treatment plan in the presence of the glue can be detrimental in a single fraction high dose SRS treatment I received the n-BCA liquid embolic system samples from Codman and Shurtleff, Inc.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642382
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CONTAINERS; DIAMONDS; IONIZATION CHAMBERS; MEV RANGE 100-1000; PHANTOMS; PLANNING; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION DOSES; VALIDATION; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Mandapaka, A, Ghebremedhin, A, Patyal, B, and Linda, Loma. SU-F-T-141: Proton Dose Validation in a Phantom Beyond TRUFILL N-BCA Embolization Glue. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956277.
Mandapaka, A, Ghebremedhin, A, Patyal, B, & Linda, Loma. SU-F-T-141: Proton Dose Validation in a Phantom Beyond TRUFILL N-BCA Embolization Glue. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956277.
Mandapaka, A, Ghebremedhin, A, Patyal, B, and Linda, Loma. 2016. "SU-F-T-141: Proton Dose Validation in a Phantom Beyond TRUFILL N-BCA Embolization Glue". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956277.
@article{osti_22642382,
title = {SU-F-T-141: Proton Dose Validation in a Phantom Beyond TRUFILL N-BCA Embolization Glue},
author = {Mandapaka, A and Ghebremedhin, A and Patyal, B and Linda, Loma},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To validate the treatment planning system predicted proton dose beyond a heterogeneity (n-BCA glue) by making a measurement in a custom acrylic phantom. Methods: A custom cubic acrylic phantom was designed for this experiment. A container was designed to fit in the phantom. This container was filled with TRUFILL™ n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate(n-BCA) glue. When the container was placed in the phantom, its center was at a distance of 7.4cm from the entrance. This depth allows us to make measurements around the center of modulation of a 126 MeV proton beam with a 3cm spread-out-Bragg peak. To make measurements at other beam energies, additional acrylic can be added in front of the phantom, to adjust the depth of the heterogeneity. A diamond detector was cross calibrated against a standard cylindrical ion chamber in a 126MeV beam. The diamond detector was then used to make dose measurements beyond the inhomogeneity. The measurement was repeated with the container filled with water. Several measurements were made at each setup, to check reproducibility of measurements. Results: For the same number of Tic3R1 counts, the dose measured with the diamond detector beyond n-BCA glue was 1.053 times the dose measured beyond the water filled container. This result is in agreement with the measured stopping power of glue (1.06). These measurements were in agreement with the dose predicted by the treatment planning system when the electron density of the heterogeneity was replaced with 1.06 before the dose calculation. Conclusion: Our initial measurements validate the dose predicted by our treatment plan in the presence of heterogeneity in a phantom. The material tested (n-BCA glue) is commonly used in the treatment of AVM’s prior to an SRS treatment. An error in dose predicted by the treatment plan in the presence of the glue can be detrimental in a single fraction high dose SRS treatment I received the n-BCA liquid embolic system samples from Codman and Shurtleff, Inc.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956277},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: In-vivo dosimetry and beam range verification in proton therapy could play significant role in proton treatment validation and improvements. In-vivo beam range verification, in particular, could enable new treatment techniques one of which could be the use of anterior fields for prostate treatment instead of opposed lateral fields as in current practice. This paper reports validation study of an in-vivo range verification method which can reduce the range uncertainty to submillimeter levels and potentially allow for in-vivo dosimetry. Methods: An anthropomorphic pelvic phantom is used to validate the clinical potential of the time-resolved dose method for range verification inmore » the case of prostrate treatment using range modulated anterior proton beams. The method uses a 3 × 4 matrix of 1 mm diodes mounted in water balloon which are read by an ADC system at 100 kHz. The method is first validated against beam range measurements by dose extinction measurements. The validation is first completed in water phantom and then in pelvic phantom for both open field and treatment field configurations. Later, the beam range results are compared with the water equivalent path length (WEPL) values computed from the treatment planning system XIO. Results: Beam range measurements from both time-resolved dose method and the dose extinction method agree with submillimeter precision in water phantom. For the pelvic phantom, when discarding two of the diodes that show sign of significant range mixing, the two methods agree with ±1 mm. Only a dose of 7 mGy is sufficient to achieve this result. The comparison to the computed WEPL by the treatment planning system (XIO) shows that XIO underestimates the protons beam range. Quantifying the exact XIO range underestimation depends on the strategy used to evaluate the WEPL results. To our best evaluation, XIO underestimates the treatment beam range between a minimum of 1.7% and maximum of 4.1%. Conclusions: Time-resolved dose measurement method satisfies the two basic requirements, WEPL accuracy and minimum dose, necessary for clinical use, thus, its potential for in-vivo protons range verification. Further development is needed, namely, devising a workflow that takes into account the limits imposed by proton range mixing and the susceptibility of the comparison of measured and expected WEPLs to errors on the detector positions. The methods may also be used for in-vivo dosimetry and could benefit various proton therapy treatments.« less
  • The purpose of this study was to assess whether portal vein embolization (PVE) using a nitinol vascular plug in combination with histoacryl glue and iodinized oil minimizes the risk of nontarget embolization while obtaining good levels of future liver remnant (FLR) hypertrophy. Between November 2005 and August 2008, 16 patients (8 females, 8 males; mean age, 63 {+-} 3.6 years), each with a small FLR, underwent right ipsilateral transhepatic PVE prior to major hepatectomy. Proximal PVE was initially performed by placement of a nitinol vascular plug, followed by distal embolization using a mixture of histoacryl glue and iodinized oil. Pre-more » and 6 weeks postprocedural FLR volumes were calculated using computed tomographic imaging. Selection for surgery required an FLR of 0.5% of the patient's body mass. Clinical course and outcome of surgical resection for all patients were recorded. At surgery, the ease of hepatectomy was subjectively assessed in comparison to previous experience following PVE with alternative embolic agents. PVE was successful in all patients. Mean procedure time was 30.4 {+-} 2.5 min. Mean absolute increase in FLR volume was 68.9% {+-} 12.0% (p = 0.00005). There was no evidence of nontarget embolization during the procedure or on subsequent imaging. Nine patients proceeded to extended hepatectomy. Six patients demonstrated disease progression. One patient did not achieve sufficient hypertrophy in relation to body mass to undergo hepatic resection. At surgery, the hepatobiliary surgeons observed less periportal inflammation compared to previous experience with alternative embolic agents, facilitating dissection at extended hepatectomy. In conclusion, ipsilateral transhepatic PVE using a single nitinol plug in combination with histoacryl glue and iodinized oil simplifies the procedure, offering short procedural times with minimal risk of nontarget embolization. Excellent levels of FLR hypertrophy are achieved enabling safe extended hepatectomy.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to verify the dosimetric performance of Acuros XB (AXB), a grid-based Boltzmann solver, in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: The Radiological Physics Center (RPC) head and neck (H and N) phantom was used for all calculations and measurements in this study. Clinically equivalent IMRT and VMAT plans were created on the RPC H and N phantom in the Eclipse treatment planning system (version 10.0) by using RPC dose prescription specifications. The dose distributions were calculated with two different algorithms, AXB 11.0.03 and anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) 10.0.24. Twomore » dose report modes of AXB were recorded: dose-to-medium in medium (D{sub m,m}) and dose-to-water in medium (D{sub w,m}). Each treatment plan was delivered to the RPC phantom three times for reproducibility by using a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator. Absolute point dose and planar dose were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and GafChromic registered EBT2 film, respectively. Profile comparison and 2D gamma analysis were used to quantify the agreement between the film measurements and the calculated dose distributions from both AXB and AAA. The computation times for AAA and AXB were also evaluated. Results: Good agreement was observed between measured doses and those calculated with AAA or AXB. Both AAA and AXB calculated doses within 5% of TLD measurements in both the IMRT and VMAT plans. Results of AXB{sub Dm,m} (0.1% to 3.6%) were slightly better than AAA (0.2% to 4.6%) or AXB{sub Dw,m} (0.3% to 5.1%). The gamma analysis for both AAA and AXB met the RPC 7%/4 mm criteria (over 90% passed), whereas AXB{sub Dm,m} met 5%/3 mm criteria in most cases. AAA was 2 to 3 times faster than AXB for IMRT, whereas AXB was 4-6 times faster than AAA for VMAT. Conclusions: AXB was found to be satisfactorily accurate when compared to measurements in the RPC H and N phantom. Compared with AAA, AXB results were equal to or better than those obtained with film measurements for IMRT and VMAT plans. The AXB{sub Dm,m} reporting mode was found to be closer to TLD and film measurements than was the AXB{sub Dw,m} mode. AXB calculation time was found to be significantly shorter (x 4) than AAA for VMAT.« less
  • Purpose: This study assesses the accuracy of the absorbed dose estimates from CT scans generated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using a commercially available radiation dose monitoring software program. Methods: Axial CT studies of an anthropomorphic abdomen phantom with dose bores at a central location and 4 peripheral locations were conducted using a fixed tube current at 120 kV. A 100 mm ion chamber and a 0.6 cc ion chamber calibrated at diagnostic energy levels were used to measure dose in the phantom at each of the 5 dose bore locations. Simulations using the software program's Monte Carlo engine weremore » run using a mathematical model of the anthropomorphic phantom to determine conversion coefficients between the CTDIvol used for the study and the dose at the location of the dose bores. Simulations were conducted using both the software's generic CT beam model and a refined model generated using HVL and bow tie filter profile measurements made on the scanner used for the study. Results: Monte Carlo simulations completed using the generalized beam model differed from the measured conversion factors by an absolute value average of 13.0% and 13.8% for the 100 mm and 0.6 cc ion chamber studies, respectively. The MC simulations using the scanner specific beam model generated conversion coefficients that differed from the CTDIvol to measured dose conversion coefficients by an absolute value average of 7.3% and 7.8% for the 100 mm and 0.6 cc ion chamber cases, respectively. Conclusion: A scanner specific beam model used in MC simulations generates more accurate dose conversion coefficients in an anthropomorphic phantom than those generated with a generalized beam model. Agreement between measured conversion coefficients and simulated values were less than 20% for all positions using the universal beam model.« less
  • Purpose: To experimentally validate a rotational kV x-ray source characterization technique by computing CT dose in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom using an in-house dose computation algorithm (kVDoseCalc). Methods: The lateral variation in incident energy spectra of a GE Optima big bore CT scanner was found by measuring the HVL along the internal, full bow-tie filter axis. The HVL and kVp were used to generate the x-ray spectra using Spektr software, while beam fluence was derived by dividing the integral product of the spectra and in-air mass-energy absorption coefficients by in-air dose measurements along the bow-tie filter axis. Beams produced bymore » the GE Optima scanner were modeled at 80 and 140 kVp tube settings. kVDoseCalc calculates dose by solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation using a combination of deterministic and stochastic methods. Relative doses in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom (E2E SBRT Phantom) irradiated by the GE Optima scanner were measured using a (0.015 cc) PTW Freiburg ionization chamber, and compared to computations from kVDoseCalc. Results: The agreement in relative dose between dose computation and measurement for points of interest (POIs) within the primary path of the beam was within experimental uncertainty for both energies, however points outside the primary beam were not. The average absolute percent difference for POIs within the primary path of the beam was 1.37% and 5.16% for 80 and 140 kVp, respectively. The minimum and maximum absolute percent difference for both energies and all POIs within the primary path of the beam was 0.151% and 6.41%, respectively. Conclusion: The CT x-ray source characterization technique based on HVL measurements and kVp can be used to accurately compute CT dose in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom.« less