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Title: SU-F-T-134: Can We Use the Same Dose Constrains Learnt From Photon World to Plan Proton for Lung Cancer?

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate if the same DVH constrains used in photon plans can be safely used to plan proton therapy for lung cancer. Since protons and photons have different dose deposition patterns, the hypothesis is following DVH constrains derived from photon world is not safe for proton. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated plans for 11 lung cancer patients. Each patient was planned with photon and proton following the same dose constrains. Dose statistics on PTV, normal lung, heart and esophagus were extracted for comparison. gEUD for normal lung was calculated and compared between proton and photon plans. We calculated series of gEUDs for each plan by varying the parameter “a” in gEUD formula from 0.1 to 3, covering the whole confidence interval. Results: For all patients, proton plans yield similar PTV coverage and lower dose to heart and esophagus than photon plans. Normal lung V5 was 32.3 % on average in proton plans than 55.4 % in photon. Normal lung gEUD monotonically increased with increasing “a” for all proton and photon plans. For a given patient, the gEUD-proton(a) had a steeper slope than gEUD-photon(a). The two curves crossed for 8 out of 11 patients when “a” = [0.1, 3]. a-crossing rangedmore » from 0.8 to 2.44 with an average of 1.15. For a« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2];  [3]
  1. Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)
  2. Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)
  3. Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers The State University of New, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642375
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; LUNGS; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PHOTONS; PRODUCTIVITY; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION DOSES

Citation Formats

Xiao, Z, Zou, J, Yue, N, and Zhang, M. SU-F-T-134: Can We Use the Same Dose Constrains Learnt From Photon World to Plan Proton for Lung Cancer?. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956270.
Xiao, Z, Zou, J, Yue, N, & Zhang, M. SU-F-T-134: Can We Use the Same Dose Constrains Learnt From Photon World to Plan Proton for Lung Cancer?. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956270.
Xiao, Z, Zou, J, Yue, N, and Zhang, M. Wed . "SU-F-T-134: Can We Use the Same Dose Constrains Learnt From Photon World to Plan Proton for Lung Cancer?". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956270.
@article{osti_22642375,
title = {SU-F-T-134: Can We Use the Same Dose Constrains Learnt From Photon World to Plan Proton for Lung Cancer?},
author = {Xiao, Z and Zou, J and Yue, N and Zhang, M},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate if the same DVH constrains used in photon plans can be safely used to plan proton therapy for lung cancer. Since protons and photons have different dose deposition patterns, the hypothesis is following DVH constrains derived from photon world is not safe for proton. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated plans for 11 lung cancer patients. Each patient was planned with photon and proton following the same dose constrains. Dose statistics on PTV, normal lung, heart and esophagus were extracted for comparison. gEUD for normal lung was calculated and compared between proton and photon plans. We calculated series of gEUDs for each plan by varying the parameter “a” in gEUD formula from 0.1 to 3, covering the whole confidence interval. Results: For all patients, proton plans yield similar PTV coverage and lower dose to heart and esophagus than photon plans. Normal lung V5 was 32.3 % on average in proton plans than 55.4 % in photon. Normal lung gEUD monotonically increased with increasing “a” for all proton and photon plans. For a given patient, the gEUD-proton(a) had a steeper slope than gEUD-photon(a). The two curves crossed for 8 out of 11 patients when “a” = [0.1, 3]. a-crossing ranged from 0.8 to 2.44 with an average of 1.15. For a},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956270},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}