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Title: SU-F-T-133: Uniform Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer: Toxicity and Its Correlation with Dosimetry

Abstract

Purpose: To analyze the toxicity of uniform scanning proton therapy for lung cancer patients and its correlation with dose distribution. Methods: In this study, we analyzed the toxicity of 128 lung cancer patients, including 18 small cell lung cancer and 110 non small cell lung cancer patients. Each patient was treated with uniform scanning proton beams at our center using typically 2–4 fields. The prescription was typically 74 Cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) at 2 CGE per fraction. 4D Computerized Tomography (CT) scans were used to evaluate the target motion and contour the internal target volume, and repeated 3 times during the course of treatment to evaluate the need for plan adaptation. Toxicity data for these patients were obtained from the proton collaborative group (PCG) database. For cases of grade 3 toxicities or toxicities of interest such as esophagitis and radiation dermatitis, dose distributions were reviewed and analyzed in attempt to correlate the toxicity with radiation dose. Results: At a median follow up time of about 21 months, none of the patients had experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. The most common adverse effect was dermatitis (81%: 52%-Grade 1, 28%-Grade 2, and 1% Grade 3), followed by fatigue (48%), Cough (46%),more » and Esophagitis (45%), as shown in Figure 1. Severe toxicities, such as Grade 3 dermatitis or pain of skin, had a clear correlation with high radiation dose. Conclusion: Uniform scanning proton therapy is well tolerated by lung cancer patients. Preliminary analysis indicates there is correlation between severe toxicity and high radiation dose. Understanding of radiation resulted toxicities and careful choice of beam arrangement are critical in minimizing toxicity of skin and other organs.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642374
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CORRELATIONS; DERMATITIS; IMAGE PROCESSING; LUNGS; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSE UNITS; RADIOTHERAPY; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Zheng, Y, Rana, S, and Larson, G. SU-F-T-133: Uniform Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer: Toxicity and Its Correlation with Dosimetry. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956269.
Zheng, Y, Rana, S, & Larson, G. SU-F-T-133: Uniform Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer: Toxicity and Its Correlation with Dosimetry. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956269.
Zheng, Y, Rana, S, and Larson, G. 2016. "SU-F-T-133: Uniform Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer: Toxicity and Its Correlation with Dosimetry". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956269.
@article{osti_22642374,
title = {SU-F-T-133: Uniform Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer: Toxicity and Its Correlation with Dosimetry},
author = {Zheng, Y and Rana, S and Larson, G},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To analyze the toxicity of uniform scanning proton therapy for lung cancer patients and its correlation with dose distribution. Methods: In this study, we analyzed the toxicity of 128 lung cancer patients, including 18 small cell lung cancer and 110 non small cell lung cancer patients. Each patient was treated with uniform scanning proton beams at our center using typically 2–4 fields. The prescription was typically 74 Cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) at 2 CGE per fraction. 4D Computerized Tomography (CT) scans were used to evaluate the target motion and contour the internal target volume, and repeated 3 times during the course of treatment to evaluate the need for plan adaptation. Toxicity data for these patients were obtained from the proton collaborative group (PCG) database. For cases of grade 3 toxicities or toxicities of interest such as esophagitis and radiation dermatitis, dose distributions were reviewed and analyzed in attempt to correlate the toxicity with radiation dose. Results: At a median follow up time of about 21 months, none of the patients had experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. The most common adverse effect was dermatitis (81%: 52%-Grade 1, 28%-Grade 2, and 1% Grade 3), followed by fatigue (48%), Cough (46%), and Esophagitis (45%), as shown in Figure 1. Severe toxicities, such as Grade 3 dermatitis or pain of skin, had a clear correlation with high radiation dose. Conclusion: Uniform scanning proton therapy is well tolerated by lung cancer patients. Preliminary analysis indicates there is correlation between severe toxicity and high radiation dose. Understanding of radiation resulted toxicities and careful choice of beam arrangement are critical in minimizing toxicity of skin and other organs.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956269},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Intrathoracic recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after initial treatment remains a dominant cause of death. We report our experience using proton beam therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy for reirradiation in such cases, focusing on patterns of failure, criteria for patient selection, and predictors of toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 patients underwent reirradiation for intrathoracic recurrent NSCLC at a single institution. All doses were recalculated to an equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2). All patients had received radiation therapy for NSCLC (median initial dose of 70 EQD2 Gy), with median interval to reirradiation ofmore » 17 months and median reirradiation dose of 60.48 EQD2 Gy. Median follow-up time was 6.5 months (range, 0-72 months). Results: Ninety-nine patients (97%) completed reirradiation. Median local failure-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and overall survival times were 11.43 months (range, 8.6-22.66 months), 11.43 months (range, 6.83-23.84 months), and 14.71 (range, 10.34-20.56 months), respectively. Toxicity was acceptable, with rates of grade ≥3 esophageal toxicity of 7% and grade ≥3 pulmonary toxicity of 10%. Of the patients who developed local failure after reirradiation, 88% had failure in either the original or the reirradiation field. Poor local control was associated with T4 disease, squamous histology, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score >1. Concurrent chemotherapy improved DMFS, but T4 disease was associated with poor DMFS. Higher T status, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥1, squamous histology, and larger reirradiation target volumes led to worse overall survival; receipt of concurrent chemotherapy and higher EQD2 were associated with improved OS. Conclusions: Intensity modulated radiation therapy and proton beam therapy are options for treating recurrent non-small cell lung cancer. However, rates of locoregional recurrence and distant metastasis are high, and patients should be selected carefully to maximize the benefit of additional aggressive local therapy while minimizing the risk of adverse side effects.« less
  • Purpose: To describe our experiences with patient-specific quality assurance (QA) for patients with prostate cancer receiving spot scanning proton therapy (SSPT) using single-field uniform dose (SFUD). Methods and Materials: The first group of 249 patients with prostate cancer treated with SSPT using SFUD was included in this work. The scanning-beam planning target volume and number of monitor units were recorded and checked for consistency. Patient-specific dosimetric measurements were performed, including the point dose for each plan, depth doses, and two-dimensional (2D) dose distribution in the planes perpendicular to the incident beam direction for each field at multiple depths. The {gamma}-indexmore » with 3% dose or 3-mm distance agreement criteria was used to evaluate the 2D dose distributions. Results: We observed a linear relationship between the number of monitor units and scanning-beam planning target volume. The difference between the measured and calculated point doses (mean {+-} SD) was 0.0% {+-} 0.7% (range, -2.9% to 1.8%). In general, the depth doses exhibited good agreement except at the distal end of the spread-out Bragg peak. The pass rate of {gamma}-index (mean {+-} SD) for 2D dose comparison was 96.2% {+-} 2.6% (range, 90-100%). Discrepancies between the measured and calculated dose distributions primarily resulted from the limitation of the model used by the treatment planning system. Conclusions: We have established a patient-specific QA program for prostate cancer patients receiving SSPT using SFUD.« less
  • Purpose: To analyze the toxicity and patterns of failure of proton therapy given in ablative doses for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with medically inoperable T1N0M0 (central location) or T2-3N0M0 (any location) NSCLC were treated with proton therapy at 87.5 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) at 2.5 Gy /fraction in this Phase I/II study. All patients underwent treatment simulation with four-dimensional CT; internal gross tumor volumes were delineated on maximal intensity projection images and modified by visual verification of the target volume in 10 breathing phases. The internal gross tumor volumes with maximalmore » intensity projection density was used to design compensators and apertures to account for tumor motion. Therapy consisted of passively scattered protons. All patients underwent repeat four-dimensional CT simulations during treatment to assess the need for adaptive replanning. Results: At a median follow-up time of 16.3 months (range, 4.8-36.3 months), no patient had experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. The most common adverse effect was dermatitis (Grade 2, 67%; Grade 3, 17%), followed by Grade 2 fatigue (44%), Grade 2 pneumonitis (11%), Grade 2 esophagitis (6%), and Grade 2 chest wall pain (6%). Rates of local control were 88.9%, regional lymph node failure 11.1%, and distant metastasis 27.8%. Twelve patients (67%) were still alive at the last follow-up; five had died of metastatic disease and one of preexisting cardiac disease. Conclusions: Proton therapy to ablative doses is well tolerated and produces promising local control rates for medically inoperable early-stage NSCLC.« less
  • Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence ofmore » modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a larger patient cohort are warranted.« less
  • Purpose: To quantify the impact of respiratory motion on the treatment of lung tumors with spot scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations were used to assess the interplay effect, which results from relative motion of the tumor and the proton beam, on the dose distribution in the patient. Ten patients with varying tumor sizes (2.6-82.3 cc) and motion amplitudes (3-30 mm) were included in the study. We investigated the impact of the spot size, which varies between proton facilities, and studied single fractions and conventionally fractionated treatments. The following metrics were used in the analysis: minimum/maximum/meanmore » dose, target dose homogeneity, and 2-year local control rate (2y-LC). Results: Respiratory motion reduces the target dose homogeneity, with the largest effects observed for the highest motion amplitudes. Smaller spot sizes (σ ≈ 3 mm) are inherently more sensitive to motion, decreasing target dose homogeneity on average by a factor 2.8 compared with a larger spot size (σ ≈ 13 mm). Using a smaller spot size to treat a tumor with 30-mm motion amplitude reduces the minimum dose to 44.7% of the prescribed dose, decreasing modeled 2y-LC from 87.0% to 2.7%, assuming a single fraction. Conventional fractionation partly mitigates this reduction, yielding a 2y-LC of 71.6%. For the large spot size, conventional fractionation increases target dose homogeneity and prevents a deterioration of 2y-LC for all patients. No correlation with tumor volume is observed. The effect on the normal lung dose distribution is minimal: observed changes in mean lung dose and lung V{sub 20} are <0.6 Gy(RBE) and <1.7%, respectively. Conclusions: For the patients in this study, 2y-LC could be preserved in the presence of interplay using a large spot size and conventional fractionation. For treatments using smaller spot sizes and/or in the delivery of single fractions, interplay effects can lead to significant deterioration of the dose distribution and lower 2y-LC.« less