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Title: SU-F-T-126: Microdosimetic Evaluation of Proton Energy Distributions in the Vicinity of Metal Implants

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the impact of titanium and surgical stainless steel implants on the microscopic dose distribution in proton treatment plans Methods: Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations were used to analyze the microdosimetric distribution of proton radiation in the vicinity of 3.1 mm thick CP Grade 4 titanium (Ti) or 316 stainless steel (SS316) plates in a water phantom. Additional simulations were performed using either water, or water with a density equivalent to the respective metals (Tiwater, SS316water) (to reflect common practice in treatment planning). Implants were placed at the COM of SOBPs of 157 MeV (range of ∼15 cm in water) protons with 30 or 60 mm modulation. Primary and secondary particle dose and fluence, frequency-weighted and dose-weighted average lineal energy, average radiation quality factor, dose equivalent and energy deposition histograms in the plate vicinity were compared. Results: Preliminary results show frequency-weighted (yf) and dose-weighted lineal energy (yd) was increased downstream of the Ti plate (yf = 3.1 keV/µm; yd = 5.5 keV/µm) and Tiwater (yf = 4.1 keV/µm; yd = 6.8 keV/µm) compared to that of water (ie, the absence of a plate) (yf = 2.5 keV/µm; yd = 4.5 keV/µm). In addition, downstream proton dose deposition was alsomore » elevated due to the presence of the Ti plate or Tiwater. The additional dose deposited at higher lineal energy implies that tissues downstream of the plate will receive a higher dose equivalent. Detailed analyses of the Ti, Tiwater, SS316, and SS316 water simulations will be presented. Conclusion: The presence of high-density materials introduces changes in the spatial distribution of radiation in the vicinity of an implant. Further work quantifying these effects could be incorporated into future treatment planning systems resulting in more accurate treatment plans. This project was sponsored with funding from the Department of Defense (DOD # W81XWH-10-2-0192).« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642367
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
07 ISOTOPES AND RADIATION SOURCES; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DOSE EQUIVALENTS; ENERGY SPECTRA; IMPLANTS; KEV RANGE 01-10; MEV RANGE 100-1000; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PLANNING; QUALITY FACTOR; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; STAINLESS STEELS

Citation Formats

Heczko, S, McAuley, GA, Slater, JM, Wroe, A, and Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA. SU-F-T-126: Microdosimetic Evaluation of Proton Energy Distributions in the Vicinity of Metal Implants. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956262.
Heczko, S, McAuley, GA, Slater, JM, Wroe, A, & Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA. SU-F-T-126: Microdosimetic Evaluation of Proton Energy Distributions in the Vicinity of Metal Implants. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956262.
Heczko, S, McAuley, GA, Slater, JM, Wroe, A, and Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA. 2016. "SU-F-T-126: Microdosimetic Evaluation of Proton Energy Distributions in the Vicinity of Metal Implants". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956262.
@article{osti_22642367,
title = {SU-F-T-126: Microdosimetic Evaluation of Proton Energy Distributions in the Vicinity of Metal Implants},
author = {Heczko, S and McAuley, GA and Slater, JM and Wroe, A and Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate the impact of titanium and surgical stainless steel implants on the microscopic dose distribution in proton treatment plans Methods: Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations were used to analyze the microdosimetric distribution of proton radiation in the vicinity of 3.1 mm thick CP Grade 4 titanium (Ti) or 316 stainless steel (SS316) plates in a water phantom. Additional simulations were performed using either water, or water with a density equivalent to the respective metals (Tiwater, SS316water) (to reflect common practice in treatment planning). Implants were placed at the COM of SOBPs of 157 MeV (range of ∼15 cm in water) protons with 30 or 60 mm modulation. Primary and secondary particle dose and fluence, frequency-weighted and dose-weighted average lineal energy, average radiation quality factor, dose equivalent and energy deposition histograms in the plate vicinity were compared. Results: Preliminary results show frequency-weighted (yf) and dose-weighted lineal energy (yd) was increased downstream of the Ti plate (yf = 3.1 keV/µm; yd = 5.5 keV/µm) and Tiwater (yf = 4.1 keV/µm; yd = 6.8 keV/µm) compared to that of water (ie, the absence of a plate) (yf = 2.5 keV/µm; yd = 4.5 keV/µm). In addition, downstream proton dose deposition was also elevated due to the presence of the Ti plate or Tiwater. The additional dose deposited at higher lineal energy implies that tissues downstream of the plate will receive a higher dose equivalent. Detailed analyses of the Ti, Tiwater, SS316, and SS316 water simulations will be presented. Conclusion: The presence of high-density materials introduces changes in the spatial distribution of radiation in the vicinity of an implant. Further work quantifying these effects could be incorporated into future treatment planning systems resulting in more accurate treatment plans. This project was sponsored with funding from the Department of Defense (DOD # W81XWH-10-2-0192).},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956262},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric accuracy for proton therapy patients with metal implants in CT using metal deletion technique (MDT) artifacts reduction. Methods: Proton dose accuracies under CT metal artifacts were first evaluated using a water phantom with cylindrical inserts of different materials (titanium and steel). Ranges and dose profiles along different beam angles were calculated using treatment planning system (Eclipse version 8.9) on uncorrected CT, MDT CT, and manually-corrected CT, where true Hounsfield units (water) were assigned to the streak artifacts. In patient studies, the treatment plans were developed on manually-corrected CTs, then recalculated on MDT and uncorrected CTs.more » DVH indices were compared between the dose distributions on all the CTs. Results: For water phantom study with 1/2 inch titanium insert, the proton range differences estimated by MDT CT were with 1% for all beam angles, while the range error can be up to 2.6% for uncorrected CT. For the study with 1 inch stainless steel insert, the maximum range error calculated by MDT CT was 1.09% among all the beam angles compared with maximum range error with 4.7% for uncorrected CT. The dose profiles calculated on MDT CTs for both titanium and steel inserts showed very good agreements with the ones calculated on manually-corrected CTs, while large dose discrepancies calculated using uncorrected CTs were observed in the distal end region of the proton beam. The patient study showed similar dose distribution and DVHs for organs near the metal artifacts recalculated on MDT CT compared with the ones calculated on manually-corrected CT, while the differences between uncorrected and corrected CTs were much pronounced. Conclusion: In proton therapy, large dose error could occur due to metal artifact. The MDT CT can be used for proton dose calculation to achieve similar dose accuracy as the current clinical practice using manual correction.« less
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