skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-F-T-112: Long-Term Follow-Up of NSCLC Patients Treated with Lung SBRT Using the Modified Conformal Arc (MDCA) Planning Technique

Abstract

Purpose: To assess long-term toxicity and primary tumor changes for Stage I/II non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients after treatment with lung SBRT using the modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) planning technique. Methods: Clinical and radiograph data from electronic health records of 15 NSCLC patients treated with lung SBRT utilizing the MDCA technique between October 2011 and July 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. MDCA uses a coplanar beam arrangement, patient body center for the beam isocenter, and six partial rotation conformal arcs to target the tumor. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines for treatment parameters were followed. Most patients received 5 radiation fractions (Range: 3 to 7 fractions) with 48 hours between each fraction. Median total dose was 60 Gy (range: 45 to 70 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 18 months (range: 6–51 months). Median age was 72.5 years (range: 48–90 years). Post-treatment findings included fatigue (n = 5) and chronic chest wall pain (n=1). Seven patients reported respiratory symptoms, which included: cough (n = 4), dyspnea (n = 5), and hemoptysis (n = 1). No patients deaths or grade ≥4 toxicity were recorded. Radiographic scarring was seen on computed tomography (CT) imaging in 6 patients. Local control rate was 93.3%more » (n = 14) and 1 patient had local recurrence. Conclusion: Our results were very similar to RTOG 0236 findings reported by Timmerman et al. – our local control rate was 93.3% compared to their 3-year primary tumor control rate of 97.6%. Toxicity rates were also similar – RTOG 0236 constitutional symptoms and pulmonary/upper respiratory symptoms rates were 36.4% and 60.0%, respectively, while ours were 33.3% and 46.7%, respectively. We were limited by a small sample size and relatively short follow-up but our findings support the use of the MDCA technique for lung SBRT treatment of Stage I/II NSCLC.« less

Authors:
;  [1]; ; ; ;  [2]
  1. Frank H Netter, MD, School of Medicine, North Haven, CT (United States)
  2. St. Vincent’s Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642354
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; GY RANGE 10-100; IMAGES; LUNGS; PATIENTS; PLANNING; RATS; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Ku, E, Desai, A, Fang, D, Lawrence, C, Iannuzzi, C, and Shi, C. SU-F-T-112: Long-Term Follow-Up of NSCLC Patients Treated with Lung SBRT Using the Modified Conformal Arc (MDCA) Planning Technique. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956248.
Ku, E, Desai, A, Fang, D, Lawrence, C, Iannuzzi, C, & Shi, C. SU-F-T-112: Long-Term Follow-Up of NSCLC Patients Treated with Lung SBRT Using the Modified Conformal Arc (MDCA) Planning Technique. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956248.
Ku, E, Desai, A, Fang, D, Lawrence, C, Iannuzzi, C, and Shi, C. 2016. "SU-F-T-112: Long-Term Follow-Up of NSCLC Patients Treated with Lung SBRT Using the Modified Conformal Arc (MDCA) Planning Technique". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956248.
@article{osti_22642354,
title = {SU-F-T-112: Long-Term Follow-Up of NSCLC Patients Treated with Lung SBRT Using the Modified Conformal Arc (MDCA) Planning Technique},
author = {Ku, E and Desai, A and Fang, D and Lawrence, C and Iannuzzi, C and Shi, C},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To assess long-term toxicity and primary tumor changes for Stage I/II non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients after treatment with lung SBRT using the modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) planning technique. Methods: Clinical and radiograph data from electronic health records of 15 NSCLC patients treated with lung SBRT utilizing the MDCA technique between October 2011 and July 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. MDCA uses a coplanar beam arrangement, patient body center for the beam isocenter, and six partial rotation conformal arcs to target the tumor. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines for treatment parameters were followed. Most patients received 5 radiation fractions (Range: 3 to 7 fractions) with 48 hours between each fraction. Median total dose was 60 Gy (range: 45 to 70 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 18 months (range: 6–51 months). Median age was 72.5 years (range: 48–90 years). Post-treatment findings included fatigue (n = 5) and chronic chest wall pain (n=1). Seven patients reported respiratory symptoms, which included: cough (n = 4), dyspnea (n = 5), and hemoptysis (n = 1). No patients deaths or grade ≥4 toxicity were recorded. Radiographic scarring was seen on computed tomography (CT) imaging in 6 patients. Local control rate was 93.3% (n = 14) and 1 patient had local recurrence. Conclusion: Our results were very similar to RTOG 0236 findings reported by Timmerman et al. – our local control rate was 93.3% compared to their 3-year primary tumor control rate of 97.6%. Toxicity rates were also similar – RTOG 0236 constitutional symptoms and pulmonary/upper respiratory symptoms rates were 36.4% and 60.0%, respectively, while ours were 33.3% and 46.7%, respectively. We were limited by a small sample size and relatively short follow-up but our findings support the use of the MDCA technique for lung SBRT treatment of Stage I/II NSCLC.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956248},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • To implement modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocols in our clinic for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment of patients with Stage I/II non–small cell lung cancer. Five patients with non–small cell lung cancer have been treated with SBRT. All the patients were immobilized using CIVCO Body Pro-Lok system and scanned using GE 4-slice computed tomography. The MDCA technique that was previously published was adopted as our planning technique, and RTOG protocols for the lung SBRT were followed. The patients were treated on Novalis Tx system with cone-beam computed tomography imaging guidance. Allmore » the patient plans passed the RTOG criteria. The conformal index ranges from 0.99 to 1.12 for the planning target volume, and the biological equivalent dose for the planning target volume is overall 100 Gy. Critical structures (lung, spinal cord, brachial plexus, skin, and chest wall) also meet RTOG protocols or published data. A 6-month follow-up of one of the patients shows good local disease control. We have successfully implemented the MDCA technique into our clinic for the lung SBRT program. It shows that the MDCA is useful and efficient for the lung SBRT planning, with the plan quality meeting the RTOG protocols.« less
  • Liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a feasible treatment method for the nonoperable, patient with early-stage liver cancer. Treatment planning for the SBRT is very important and has to consider the simulation accuracy, planning time, treatment efficiency effects etc. The modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique is a 3-dimensional conformal arc planning method, which has been proposed for liver SBRT planning at our center. In this study, we compared the MDCA technique with the RapidArc technique in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs). The results show that the MDCA technique hasmore » comparable plan quality to RapidArc considering PTV coverage, hot spots, heterogeneity index, and effective liver volume. For the 5 PTVs studied among 4 patients, the MDCA plan, when compared with the RapidArc plan, showed 9% more hot spots, more heterogeneity effect, more sparing of OARs, and lower liver effective volume. The monitor unit (MU) number for the MDCA plan is much lower than for the RapidArc plans. The MDCA plan has the advantages of less planning time, no-collision treatment, and a lower MU number.« less
  • Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after themore » same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye award; Disclosure/Conflict of interest: Raymond H. Mak: Stock ownership: Celgene, Inc. Consulting: Boehringer-Ingelheim, Inc.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate factors associated with treatment-related pneumonitis in non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 223 patients treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Treatment-related pneumonitis was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictive factors. Results: Median follow-up was 10.5 months (range, 1.4-58 months). The actuarial incidence of Grade {>=}3 pneumonitis was 22% at 6 months and 32% at 1 year. By univariate analyses, lung volume, gross tumor volume, mean lung dose, and relative V5 through V65, in incrementsmore » of 5 Gy, were all found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. The mean lung dose and rV5-rV65 were highly correlated (p < 0.0001). By multivariate analysis, relative V5 was the most significant factor associated with treatment-related pneumonitis; the 1-year actuarial incidences of Grade {>=}3 pneumonitis in the group with V5 {<=}42% and V5 >42% were 3% and 38%, respectively (p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this study, a number of clinical and dosimetric factors were found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. However, rV5 was the only significant factor associated with this toxicity. Until it is better understood which dose range is most relevant, multiple clinical and dosimetric factors should be considered in treatment planning for non-small-cell lung cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate whether Monte Carlo (MC) recalculated dose distributions can predict the geometric location of the recurrence for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: Thirty NSCLC patients with local recurrence were retrospectively selected for this study. The recurred gross target volumes (rGTV) were delineated on the follow-up CT/PET images and then rigidly transferred via imaging fusion to the original planning CTs. Failure pattern was defined according to the overlap between the rGTV and planning GTV (pGTV) as: (a) in-field failure (≥80%), (b) marginal failure (20%–80%), and (c) out-of-field failure (≤20%). All clinicalmore » plans were calculated initially with pencil beam (PB) with or without heterogeneity correction dependent of protocols. These plans were recalculated with MC with heterogeneity correction. Because of non-uniform dose distributions in the rGTVs, the rGTVs were further divided into four regions: inside the pGTV (GTVin), inside the PTV (PTVin), outside the pGTV (GTVout), and outside the PTV (PTVout). The mean doses to these regions were reported and analyzed separately. Results: Among 30 patients, 10 patients had infield recurrences, 15 marginal and 5 out-of-field failures. With MC calculations, D95 and D99 of the PTV were reduced by (10.6 ± 7.4)% and (11.7 ± 7.9)%. The average MC calculated mean doses of GTVin, GTVout, PTVin and PTVout were 48.2 ± 5.3 Gy, 48.2 ± 5.5 Gy, 46.3 ± 6.2 Gy and 46.6 ± 5.6 Gy, respectively. No significant dose differences between GTVin and GTVout (p=0.65), PTVin and PTVout (p=0.19) were observed, using the paired students t-test. Conclusion: Although the PB calculations underestimated the tumor target doses, the geometric location of the recurrence did not correlate with the mean doses of subsections of the recurrent GTV. Under dose regions recalculated by MC cannot predict the local failure for NSCLC patients treated with SBRT.« less