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Title: SU-F-T-107: Correlations Between Dosimetric Indices of Pharyngeal Constrictors and Proximal Esophagus with Associated Patient-Reported Outcomes Six Months After Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

Abstract

Purpose: To compare the correlations between different dosimetric indices derived from the pharyngeal constrictor muscles and proximal esophagus with patient-reported difficulty in swallowing 6 months post radiotherapy using a novel patient reported outcome version of CTCAE (PRO-CTCAE). Methods: Forty-three patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were treated on a prospective multi-institutional study. All patients received de-intensified 60 Gy intensity modulated radiotherapy. We investigated correlations of individual patient dosimetric data of the superior (SPC), middle (MPC), inferior (IPC) pharyngeal constrictor muscles, the superior esophagus (SES), and the inferior esophagus (IES) to their self-reported 6 month post-treatment swallowing difficulty responses. Mild (≥ Grade 1) swallowing difficulty responses were used as the clinical endpoint indicating response. The predictive efficacy of Dmean and dose-volume (VD) points were assessed through the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC) and Odds Ratio (OR). Results: The SES and SPC had more favorable area under the curves (AUC) for the Dmean (0.62 and 0.70) while the Dmean to the IPC, MPC, and IES produced suboptimal AUCs (0.42, 0.48, and 0.52). Additionally, over the range of VD, the V54 and V55 for the SES and SPC demonstrated the highest AUCs: AUC(SES) = 0.76–0.73 and AUC(SPC) = 0.72–0.69, respectively.more » The IES, IPC, and MPC had worse AUC results over the range of VD. An optimal OR can be found when V54 = 96% for the SPC, where OR = 3.96 (1.07–14.62). Conclusion: The V45 and V55 of the SES and SPC had the highest correlation to the clinical endpoint compared to the commonly used dosimetric index, Dmean for both the esophagus and constrictor muscles. The reported dosimetric data demonstrates that new dosimetric indices may need to be considered in the setting of dose de-escalation and self-reported outcomes.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)
  2. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
  3. University of North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States)
  4. UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642352
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; CARCINOMAS; CORRELATIONS; ESOPHAGUS; HEAD; MUSCLES; NECK; PATIENTS; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Chera, B, Price, A, Kostich, M, Green, R, Das, S, Mavroidis, P, Amdur, R, Mendenhall, W, Sheets, N, and Marks, L. SU-F-T-107: Correlations Between Dosimetric Indices of Pharyngeal Constrictors and Proximal Esophagus with Associated Patient-Reported Outcomes Six Months After Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956243.
Chera, B, Price, A, Kostich, M, Green, R, Das, S, Mavroidis, P, Amdur, R, Mendenhall, W, Sheets, N, & Marks, L. SU-F-T-107: Correlations Between Dosimetric Indices of Pharyngeal Constrictors and Proximal Esophagus with Associated Patient-Reported Outcomes Six Months After Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956243.
Chera, B, Price, A, Kostich, M, Green, R, Das, S, Mavroidis, P, Amdur, R, Mendenhall, W, Sheets, N, and Marks, L. 2016. "SU-F-T-107: Correlations Between Dosimetric Indices of Pharyngeal Constrictors and Proximal Esophagus with Associated Patient-Reported Outcomes Six Months After Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956243.
@article{osti_22642352,
title = {SU-F-T-107: Correlations Between Dosimetric Indices of Pharyngeal Constrictors and Proximal Esophagus with Associated Patient-Reported Outcomes Six Months After Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer},
author = {Chera, B and Price, A and Kostich, M and Green, R and Das, S and Mavroidis, P and Amdur, R and Mendenhall, W and Sheets, N and Marks, L},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To compare the correlations between different dosimetric indices derived from the pharyngeal constrictor muscles and proximal esophagus with patient-reported difficulty in swallowing 6 months post radiotherapy using a novel patient reported outcome version of CTCAE (PRO-CTCAE). Methods: Forty-three patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were treated on a prospective multi-institutional study. All patients received de-intensified 60 Gy intensity modulated radiotherapy. We investigated correlations of individual patient dosimetric data of the superior (SPC), middle (MPC), inferior (IPC) pharyngeal constrictor muscles, the superior esophagus (SES), and the inferior esophagus (IES) to their self-reported 6 month post-treatment swallowing difficulty responses. Mild (≥ Grade 1) swallowing difficulty responses were used as the clinical endpoint indicating response. The predictive efficacy of Dmean and dose-volume (VD) points were assessed through the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC) and Odds Ratio (OR). Results: The SES and SPC had more favorable area under the curves (AUC) for the Dmean (0.62 and 0.70) while the Dmean to the IPC, MPC, and IES produced suboptimal AUCs (0.42, 0.48, and 0.52). Additionally, over the range of VD, the V54 and V55 for the SES and SPC demonstrated the highest AUCs: AUC(SES) = 0.76–0.73 and AUC(SPC) = 0.72–0.69, respectively. The IES, IPC, and MPC had worse AUC results over the range of VD. An optimal OR can be found when V54 = 96% for the SPC, where OR = 3.96 (1.07–14.62). Conclusion: The V45 and V55 of the SES and SPC had the highest correlation to the clinical endpoint compared to the commonly used dosimetric index, Dmean for both the esophagus and constrictor muscles. The reported dosimetric data demonstrates that new dosimetric indices may need to be considered in the setting of dose de-escalation and self-reported outcomes.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956243},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To estimate the radiobiological parameters of four NTCP models that describe the dose-response relations of pharyngeal constrictors and proximal esophagus regarding the severity of patient reported swallowing problems 6 months post chemo-radiotherapy. To identify the section/structure that best correlates with the manifestation of the clinical endpoints. Finally, to compare the goodness-of-fit of those models. Methods: Forty-three patients were treated on a prospective multi-institutional phase II study for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. All the patients received 60 Gy IMRT and they reported symptoms using the novel patient reported outcome version of the CTCAE. We derived the individual patient dosimetric datamore » of superior, medium and inferior sections of pharyngeal constrictors (SPC, MPC and IPC), superior and inferior sections of esophagus (SES and IES) as separate structures as well as combinations. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB), Relative Seriality (RS), Logit and Relative Logit (RL) NTCP models were used to fit the patient data. The fitting of the different models was assessed through the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and the Odds Ratio methods. Results: The AUC values were highest for the SPC for Grade ≥ 2 (0.719 for the RS and RL models, and 0.716 for LKB and Logit). For Grade ≥ 1, the respective values were 0.699 for RS, LKB and Logit and 0.676 for RL. For MPC the AUC values varied between 0.463–0.477, for IPC between 0.396–0.458, for SES between 0.556–0.613 and for IES between 0.410–0.519. The Odds Ratio for the SPC was 15.6 (1.7–146.4) for RS, LKB and Logit for NTCP of 55%. Conclusion: All the examined NTCP models could fit the clinical data with similar accuracy. The SPC appear to correlate best with the clinical endpoints of swallowing problems. A prospective study could establish the use of NTCP values of SPC as a constraint in treatment planning.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the correlation between different dosimetric indices of salivary glands (as separate or combined structures) to patient-reported dry mouth 6 months post radiotherapy using the novel patient reported outcome version of the CTCAE (PRO-CTCAE). Methods: Forty-three patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were treated on a prospective multi-institutional study. All patients received de-intensified 60 Gy intensity modulated radiotherapy. Dosimetric constraints were used for the salivary glands (e.g. mean dose to the contralateral-parotid < 26 Gy). We investigated correlations of individual patient dosimetric data of the parotid and submandibular glands (as separate or combined structures) to their self-reported 6more » month post-treatment dry mouth responses. Moderate dry mouth responses were most prevalent and were used as the clinical endpoint indicating response. The correlation of Dmean, Dmax and a range of dosevolume (VD) points were assessed through the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC) and Odds Ratios (OR). Results: Patients reporting non/mild dry mouth response (N=22) had average Dmean = 19.6 ± 6.2Gy to the contralateral-parotid compared to an average Dmean = 28.0 ± 8.3Gy and an AUC = 0.758 for the patients reporting moderate/severe/very severe dry mouth (N=21). Analysis of the range of VD’s for patients who had reported dry mouth showed that for the contralateral-parotid the indices V18 through V22 had the highest area under the curves (AUC) (0.762 – 0.772) compared to a more traditional dosimetric index V30, which had an AUC = 0.732. The highest AUC was observed for the combination of contralateral parotid and contralateral submandibular glands, for which V16 through V28 had AUC = 0.801 – 0.834. Conclusion: Patients who report moderate/severe/very severe dry mouth 6 months post radiotherapy had on average higher Dmean. The V16-V28 of the combination of the contralateral glands showed the highest correlation with the clinical endpoint.« less
  • Purpose: To describe voice and speech quality changes and their predictors in patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer treated on prospective clinical studies of organ-preserving chemotherapy–intensity modulated radiation therapy (chemo-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-one patients with stage III/IV oropharyngeal cancer were treated on 2 consecutive prospective studies of definitive chemoradiation using whole-field IMRT from 2003 to 2011. Patient-reported voice and speech quality were longitudinally assessed from before treatment through 24 months using the Communication Domain of the Head and Neck Quality of Life (HNQOL-C) instrument and the Speech question of the University of Washington Quality of Life (UWQOL-S) instrument, respectively.more » Factors associated with patient-reported voice quality worsening from baseline and speech impairment were assessed. Results: Voice quality decreased maximally at 1 month, with 68% and 41% of patients reporting worse HNQOL-C and UWQOL-S scores compared with before treatment, and improved thereafter, recovering to baseline by 12-18 months on average. In contrast, observer-rated larynx toxicity was rare (7% at 3 months; 5% at 6 months). Among patients with mean glottic larynx (GL) dose ≤20 Gy, >20-30 Gy, >30-40 Gy, >40-50 Gy, and >50 Gy, 10%, 32%, 25%, 30%, and 63%, respectively, reported worse voice quality at 12 months compared with before treatment (P=.011). Results for speech impairment were similar. Glottic larynx dose, N stage, neck dissection, oral cavity dose, and time since chemo-IMRT were univariately associated with either voice worsening or speech impairment. On multivariate analysis, mean GL dose remained independently predictive for both voice quality worsening (8.1%/Gy) and speech impairment (4.3%/Gy). Conclusions: Voice quality worsening and speech impairment after chemo-IMRT for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were frequently reported by patients, underrecognized by clinicians, and independently associated with GL dose. These findings support reducing mean GL dose to as low as reasonably achievable, aiming at ≤20 Gy when the larynx is not a target.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate patients treated with external beam radiation therapy as part of the multicenter Prostate Cancer Outcomes and Satisfaction with Treatment Quality Assessment (PROSTQA), to identify factors associated with posttreatment patient-reported bowel health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Methods and Materials: Pretreatment characteristics and treatment details among 292 men were evaluated using a general linear mixed model for their association with measured HRQOL by the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite instrument through 2 years after enrollment. Results: Bowel HRQOL had a median score of 100 (interquartile range 91.7-100) pretreatment and 95.8 (interquartile range 83.3-100) at 2 years, representing new moderate/bigmore » problems in 11% for urgency, 7% for frequency, 4% for bloody stools, and 8% for an overall bowel problems. Baseline bowel score was the strongest predictor for all 2-year endpoints. In multivariable models, a volume of rectum ≥25% treated to 70 Gy (V70) yielded a clinically significant 9.3-point lower bowel score (95% confidence interval [CI] 16.8-1.7, P=.015) and predicted increased risks for moderate to big fecal incontinence (P=.0008). No other radiation therapy treatment-related variables influenced moderate to big changes in rectal HRQOL. However, on multivariate analyses V70 ≥25% was associated with increases in small, moderate, or big problems with the following: incontinence (3.9-fold; 95% CI 1.1-13.4, P=.03), rectal bleeding (3.6-fold; 95% CI 1.3-10.2, P=.018), and bowel urgency (2.9-fold; 95% CI 1.1-7.6, P=.026). Aspirin use correlated with a clinically significant 4.7-point lower bowel summary score (95% CI 9.0-0.4, P=.03) and an increase in small, moderate, or big problems with bloody stools (2.8-fold; 95% CI 1.2-6.4, P=.018). Intensity modulated radiation therapy was associated with higher radiation therapy doses to the prostate and lower doses to the rectum but did not independently correlate with bowel HRQOL. Conclusion: After contemporary dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy up to 11% of patients have newly identified moderate/big problems with bowel HRQOL 2 years after treatment. Bowel HRQOL is related to baseline function, rectal V70, and aspirin use. Finally, our findings validate the commonly utilized cut-point of rectal V70 ≥25% as having significant impact on patient-reported outcomes.« less
  • Purpose: To identify, through a systematic review, all validated tools used for the prediction of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in patients being treated with radiation therapy for prostate cancer, and provide a comparative summary of accuracy and generalizability. Methods and Materials: PubMed and EMBASE were searched from July 2007. Title/abstract screening, full text review, and critical appraisal were undertaken by 2 reviewers, whereas data extraction was performed by a single reviewer. Eligible articles had to provide a summary measure of accuracy and undertake internal or external validation. Tools were recommended for clinical implementation if they had been externally validated and foundmore » to have accuracy ≥70%. Results: The search strategy identified 3839 potential studies, of which 236 progressed to full text review and 22 were included. From these studies, 50 tools predicted gastrointestinal/rectal symptoms, 29 tools predicted genitourinary symptoms, 4 tools predicted erectile dysfunction, and no tools predicted quality of life. For patients treated with external beam radiation therapy, 3 tools could be recommended for the prediction of rectal toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, and erectile dysfunction. For patients treated with brachytherapy, 2 tools could be recommended for the prediction of urinary retention and erectile dysfunction. Conclusions: A large number of tools for the prediction of PROMs in prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have been developed. Only a small minority are accurate and have been shown to be generalizable through external validation. This review provides an accessible catalogue of tools that are ready for clinical implementation as well as which should be prioritized for validation.« less