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Title: SU-F-T-87: Comparison of Advanced Radiotherapy Techniques for Post- Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients

Abstract

Purpose: To determine if bolus electron conformal therapy (Bolus-ECT) combined with intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) and flattening filter free volumetric modulated arc therapy (FFF-VMAT (6x and 10x)) can maintain equal or better dose coverage than standard volumetric modulated arc therapy (Std-VMAT) while reducing doses to organs at risk (OARs). Methods: Bolus-ECT with IMXT, FFF-VMAT, and Std-VMAT treatment plans were produced for ten post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) patients previously treated at our clinic. The treatment plans were created on commercially available treatment planning system (TPS) and all completed treatment plans were reviewed and approved by a radiation oncologist. The plans were evaluated based on planning target volume (PTV) coverage, tumor control probability (TCP), dose homogeneity index (DHI), conformity index (CI), and dose to organs at risk (OAR). Results: All techniques produced clinically acceptable PMRT plans. Overall, Bolus-ECT with IMXT exhibited higher maximum dose compared to all VMAT techniques. Bolus-ECT with IMXT and FFF-VMAT10x had slightly improved TCP over FFF-VMAT6x and Std-VMAT. However, all VMAT techniques showed improved CI and DHI over Bolus-ECT with IMXT. All techniques showed very similar mean lung dose. Bolus-ECT with IMXT exhibited a reduced mean heart dose over Std-VMAT. Both FFF-VMAT techniques had higher mean heart dosemore » compared to Std-VMAT. In addition, Bolus-ECT with IMXT was able to reduce mean dose to the contralateral breast compared to Std-VMAT and both FFF-VMAT techniques had comparable but slightly reduced dose compared to Std-VMAT. Conclusion: This work has shown that Bolus-ECT with IMXT produces clinically acceptable plans while reducing OAR doses. Both FFF-VMAT techniques are comparable to Std-VMAT with slight improvements. Even though all VMAT techniques produce more homogenous and conformal dose distributions, Bolus-ECT with IMXT is a viable option for treating post-mastectomy patients possibly leading to reduced risks of normal tissue complications.« less

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)
  2. Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642335
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; HAZARDS; MAMMARY GLANDS; MEDICAL PERSONNEL; PATIENTS; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIOTHERAPY; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Heins, D, Zhang, R, Hogstrom, K, and Sanders, M. SU-F-T-87: Comparison of Advanced Radiotherapy Techniques for Post- Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956223.
Heins, D, Zhang, R, Hogstrom, K, & Sanders, M. SU-F-T-87: Comparison of Advanced Radiotherapy Techniques for Post- Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956223.
Heins, D, Zhang, R, Hogstrom, K, and Sanders, M. 2016. "SU-F-T-87: Comparison of Advanced Radiotherapy Techniques for Post- Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956223.
@article{osti_22642335,
title = {SU-F-T-87: Comparison of Advanced Radiotherapy Techniques for Post- Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients},
author = {Heins, D and Zhang, R and Hogstrom, K and Sanders, M},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To determine if bolus electron conformal therapy (Bolus-ECT) combined with intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) and flattening filter free volumetric modulated arc therapy (FFF-VMAT (6x and 10x)) can maintain equal or better dose coverage than standard volumetric modulated arc therapy (Std-VMAT) while reducing doses to organs at risk (OARs). Methods: Bolus-ECT with IMXT, FFF-VMAT, and Std-VMAT treatment plans were produced for ten post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) patients previously treated at our clinic. The treatment plans were created on commercially available treatment planning system (TPS) and all completed treatment plans were reviewed and approved by a radiation oncologist. The plans were evaluated based on planning target volume (PTV) coverage, tumor control probability (TCP), dose homogeneity index (DHI), conformity index (CI), and dose to organs at risk (OAR). Results: All techniques produced clinically acceptable PMRT plans. Overall, Bolus-ECT with IMXT exhibited higher maximum dose compared to all VMAT techniques. Bolus-ECT with IMXT and FFF-VMAT10x had slightly improved TCP over FFF-VMAT6x and Std-VMAT. However, all VMAT techniques showed improved CI and DHI over Bolus-ECT with IMXT. All techniques showed very similar mean lung dose. Bolus-ECT with IMXT exhibited a reduced mean heart dose over Std-VMAT. Both FFF-VMAT techniques had higher mean heart dose compared to Std-VMAT. In addition, Bolus-ECT with IMXT was able to reduce mean dose to the contralateral breast compared to Std-VMAT and both FFF-VMAT techniques had comparable but slightly reduced dose compared to Std-VMAT. Conclusion: This work has shown that Bolus-ECT with IMXT produces clinically acceptable plans while reducing OAR doses. Both FFF-VMAT techniques are comparable to Std-VMAT with slight improvements. Even though all VMAT techniques produce more homogenous and conformal dose distributions, Bolus-ECT with IMXT is a viable option for treating post-mastectomy patients possibly leading to reduced risks of normal tissue complications.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956223},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: To compare the dosimetry of post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRMRT) for left-sided breast cancer using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: We created ten sets of PMRMRT plans for ten consecutive patients and utilized two tangential and one or two supraclavicular beams in 3DCRT, a total of 5 beams in IMRT and two optimized partial arcs in VMAT. The difference in results between any two of the three new plans, between new and previous 3DCRT plans were compared and analyzed by ANOVA (α =0.05) and paired-sample t-test respectively. Pmore » values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Both IMRT and VMAT plans had similar PTV coverage, hotspot area and conformity (all p>0.05), and significantly higher PTV coverage compared with new 3DCRT (both p<0.001). IMRT plans had significantly less heart and left lung radiation exposure compared with VMAT (all p<0.05). The 3DCRT plans with larger estimated CTV displacement had better target coverage but worse OARs sparing compared to those with smaller one. Conclusion: IMRT has dosimetrical advantages over the other two techniques in PMRMRT for left-sided breast cancer. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve dosage distribution. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)« less
  • Purpose: Breast boards are used in breast radiation which increases normal lung and heart doses, when supraclavicular field is included. Therefore, in this study through dose volume histogram (DVHs), lung and heart doses comparison was done between two different setups i.e. with and without breast board, for the treatment of left chest wall and supraclavicular fossa in postmastectomy left breast cancer. Methods: In this study, CT-Simulation scans of ten breast cancer patients were done with and without breast board, at Shifa International Hospitals Islamabad, to investigate the differences between the two different setups of the irradiation of left chest wallmore » in terms of lung and heart doses. For immobilization, support under the neck, shoulders and arms was used. Precise PLAN 2.15 treatment planning system (TPS) was used for 3D-CRT planning. The total prescribed dose for both the plans was 5000 cGy/25 fractions. The chest wall was treated with a pair of tangential photon fields and the upper supraclavicular nodal regions were treated with an anterior photon field. A mono-isocentric technique was used to match the tangential fields with the anterior field at the isocentre. The dose volume histogram was used to compare the doses of heart and ipsilateral lung. Results: Both the plans of each patient were generated and compared. DVH results showed that for the same PTV dose coverage, plans without breast board resulted in a reduction of lung and heart doses compared with the plans with breast board. There was significant reductions in V20, V<25 and mean doses for lung and V<9 and mean doses for heart. Conclusion: In comparison of both the plans, setup without breast board significantly reduced the dose-volume of the ipsilateral lung and heart in left chest wall patients. Waived registration request has been submitted.« less
  • Objective: To assess the impact of radiation management on male breast cancer (MBC) at London Regional Cancer Program (LRCP). Methods and Materials: Men with a diagnosis of breast cancer referred to LRCP were reviewed. The seventh American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system was used. Patients treated with and without post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) were analyzed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was defined as time duration from diagnosis to first recurrence. Overall survival (OS) was defined as time duration from pathologic diagnosis to death or last follow-up with any death defined as an event. Survival estimates were obtained using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results:more » From January 1977 to December 2006, 81 men had invasive ductal carcinoma. The median age was 65 (range, 35-87 years). There were 15 Stage I, 40 Stage II, 20 Stage III, and 6 Stage IV patients. Median follow-up time was 46 months (range, 1-225 months). Of the 75 patients treated with curative intent, 29 did not receive PMRT and 46 completed PMRT. Patients who received PMRT demonstrated no benefit in overall survival (p = 0.872) but significantly better local recurrence free survival (p < 0.001) compared with those who did not receive RT. There was trend toward improving locoregional recurrence with PMRT in patients with high-risk features (node-positive, advanced stage, and {<=}2 mm or unknown surgical margin). The median, 5-year, and 10-year disease-free survival and overall survival for the 75 patients were 77.7 months, 66.3%, 32.7%, and 91.2 months, 73.9%, and 36.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The experience at LRCP suggests that high-risk MBC patients should consider PMRT to improve their chance of local recurrence-free survival.« less
  • Purpose: Breast cancer patients who undergo a mastectomy often require post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) due to high risk disease characteristics. PMRT usually accompanies scar boost irradiation (10–16Gy in 5–8 fractions) using en face electrons, which often results in increased dose to the underlying lungs, thereby potentially increasing the risk of radiation pneumonitis. Hence, this study evaluated water-equivalent phantoms as energy degraders and as an alternative to a bolus to reduce radiation dose to the underlying lungs for electron scar boost irradiation. Methods: Percent depth dose (PDD) profiles of 6 MeV (the lowest electron energy available in most clinics) were obtainedmore » without and with commercial solid water phantoms (1 to 5mm by 1mm increments) placed on top of electron cones. Phantom attenuation was measured by taking a ratio of outputs with to without the phantoms in 10×10cm2 cone size for monitor unit (MU) calculation. In addition, scatter dose to contralateral breast was measured on a human-like phantom using two selected scar (short and long) boost patient setups. Results: The PDD plots showed that the solid water phantoms and the bolus had similar dosimetric effects for the same thickness. Lower skin dose (up to 3%) to ipsilateral breast was observed with a 5mm phantom compared with a 5mm bolus (up to 10%) for all electron cones. Phantom attenuation was increased by 50% with about a 4.5mm phantom. Also, the energy degraders caused scatter dose to contralateral breast by a factor of 3 with a 5mm phantom. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using water-equivalent phantoms to reduce lung dose using en face electrons in patients with a thin chest wall undergoing PMRT. The disadvantages of this treatment approach (i.e., the increase in MUs and treatment time, and clinically insignificant scatter dose to the contralateral breast given usually 10Gy) are outweighed by its above clinical benefits.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the incidence and factors associated with the development of arm edema in women who participated in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) study B-04. Methods and Materials: Between 1971 and 1974, the NSABP protocol B-04 randomized 1,665 eligible patients with resectable breast cancer to either (1) the Halstead-type radical mastectomy; (2) total mastectomy and radiotherapy to the chest wall, axilla, supraclavicular region, and internal mammary nodes if by clinical examination axillary nodes were involved by tumor; and (3) for patients with a clinically uninvolved axilla, a third arm, total mastectomy alone. Measurements of themore » ipsilateral and contralateral arm circumferences were to be performed every 3 months. Results: There was at least one recorded measurement of arm circumferences for 1,457 patients (87.5% of eligible patients). There were 674 women (46.3%) who experienced arm edema at some point during the period of follow-up until February 1976. For radical mastectomy patients, total mastectomy and radiotherapy patients, and total mastectomy patients alone, arm edema was recorded at least once in 58.1%, 38.2%, and 39.1% of patients, respectively (p < .001) and at last recorded measurement in 30.7%, 14.8%, and 15.5%, respectively (p = <.001). Increasing body mass index (BMI) also showed a statistically significant correlation with arm edema at any time (p = .001) and at last assessment (p = .005). Conclusions: Patients who undergo mastectomy, including those whose treatment plans do not include axillary dissection or postoperative radiotherapy, suffer an appreciable incidence of arm edema.« less