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Title: SU-F-T-82: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Shield Used for Hemi-Body Skin Electron Irradiation

Abstract

Purpose: We had several mycosis fungoides patients with a limited disease to about half of the skin surface. A custom-made plywood shield was used to protect the non-targeted skin region with our total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) technique. We report a dosimetric evaluation for our “hemi-body” skin electron irradiation technique. Methods: The technique is similar to our clinical total skin electron irradiation (TSEI), performed with a six-pair dual field (Stanford technique) at an extended source-to-skin distance (SSD) of 377 cm, with the addition of a plywood shield placed 50 cm from the patient. The shield is made of three layers of standard 5/8″ thick plywood (total thickness of 4.75 cm) that are clamped securely on an adjustable-height stand. Gafchromic EBT3 films were used in assessing the shield’s transmission factor and the extend of the dose penumbra region. To verify the dose delivered for hemi-body skin radiation in a real patient treatment, in-vivo dosimetry using Gafchromic EBT3 films were performed. Film pieces were taped on the patient skin to measure the dose received during the first two fractions, placed on the forehead and upper body (shielded region); and also at the level of pelvic area, left thigh, and left ankle. Results:more » The shield transmission factor was found to be 10%, and the width of the penumbra (80-to-20% dose fall-off) was about 12 cm. In-vivo dosimetry of a real case confirmed the expected shielded area dose. Conclusion: Hemi-Body skin electron irradiation at an extended SSD is feasible with the addition of a plywood shield at a distance from patient skin. The penumbra dose region and the shield’s transmission factor should be evaluated prior to clinical use. We have treated several hemi-body skin patients with our custom-made plywood shield, the current patient measurements are representative of these for other patients as well.« less

Authors:
;  [1]; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642330
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; DOSIMETRY; EVALUATION; IN VIVO; IRRADIATION; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; SHIELDS; SKIN

Citation Formats

Rivers, C, Singh, A, AlDahlawi, I, Wang, I, Podgorsak, M, and State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY. SU-F-T-82: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Shield Used for Hemi-Body Skin Electron Irradiation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956218.
Rivers, C, Singh, A, AlDahlawi, I, Wang, I, Podgorsak, M, & State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY. SU-F-T-82: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Shield Used for Hemi-Body Skin Electron Irradiation. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956218.
Rivers, C, Singh, A, AlDahlawi, I, Wang, I, Podgorsak, M, and State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY. Wed . "SU-F-T-82: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Shield Used for Hemi-Body Skin Electron Irradiation". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956218.
@article{osti_22642330,
title = {SU-F-T-82: Dosimetric Evaluation of a Shield Used for Hemi-Body Skin Electron Irradiation},
author = {Rivers, C and Singh, A and AlDahlawi, I and Wang, I and Podgorsak, M and State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY},
abstractNote = {Purpose: We had several mycosis fungoides patients with a limited disease to about half of the skin surface. A custom-made plywood shield was used to protect the non-targeted skin region with our total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) technique. We report a dosimetric evaluation for our “hemi-body” skin electron irradiation technique. Methods: The technique is similar to our clinical total skin electron irradiation (TSEI), performed with a six-pair dual field (Stanford technique) at an extended source-to-skin distance (SSD) of 377 cm, with the addition of a plywood shield placed 50 cm from the patient. The shield is made of three layers of standard 5/8″ thick plywood (total thickness of 4.75 cm) that are clamped securely on an adjustable-height stand. Gafchromic EBT3 films were used in assessing the shield’s transmission factor and the extend of the dose penumbra region. To verify the dose delivered for hemi-body skin radiation in a real patient treatment, in-vivo dosimetry using Gafchromic EBT3 films were performed. Film pieces were taped on the patient skin to measure the dose received during the first two fractions, placed on the forehead and upper body (shielded region); and also at the level of pelvic area, left thigh, and left ankle. Results: The shield transmission factor was found to be 10%, and the width of the penumbra (80-to-20% dose fall-off) was about 12 cm. In-vivo dosimetry of a real case confirmed the expected shielded area dose. Conclusion: Hemi-Body skin electron irradiation at an extended SSD is feasible with the addition of a plywood shield at a distance from patient skin. The penumbra dose region and the shield’s transmission factor should be evaluated prior to clinical use. We have treated several hemi-body skin patients with our custom-made plywood shield, the current patient measurements are representative of these for other patients as well.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956218},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To compare dosimetric data of patients treated for early-stage larynx cancer on Cyberknife and Linac IMRT. Methods: Nine patients were treated with Cyberknife to a dose of 45 Gy in 10 fractions of the involved hemilarynx. The prescription dose provided at least 95% of PTV coverage. After Cyberknife treatment, the CT images and contours were sent to Pinnacle treatment planning system for IMRT planning on a regular SBRT linac with same dose prescription and constrains. Dose to target and normal tissue, including the arytenoids, cord, carotid arteries, thyroid, and skin, were analyzed using dose volume histograms. Results: For Cyberknifemore » plan, the conformity indices are within 1.11–1.33. The average dose to the contralateral arytenoids for Cyberknife plans was 28.9±6.5Gy), which is lower than the same mean dose for IMRT plans (34.0±5.2 Gy). The average maximum dose to the ipsilateral and contralateral carotid artery were 20.6 ±9.1 Gy and 10.2±6.0 Gy respectively for Cybeknife comparing with 22.1±8.0 Gy and 12.0±5.1 Gy for IMRT. The mean dose to the thyroid was 3.6±2.2 Gy for Cyberknife and 3.4±2.4 Gy for IMRT. As shown in DVH, the Cyberknife can deliver less dose to the normal tissue which is close to target area comparing with IMRT Plans. However, IMRT plan’s can give more sparing for the critical organs which is far away from the target area. Conclusion: We have compared the dosimetric parameters of Cyberknife and linac IMRT plans for patients with early-stage larynx cancer. Both Cyberknife and IMRT plans can achieve conformal dose distribution to the target area. Cyberknife was able to reduce normal tissue dose in high doses region while IMRT plans can reduce the dose of the normal tissue at the low dose region. These dosimetric parameters can be used to guide future prospective protocols using SBRT for larynx cancer.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric and radiobiological impact of Acuros XB (AXB) and Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA) dose calculation algorithms on prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy plans with both conventional flattened (FF) and flattening-filter free (FFF) modes. Methods: For thirteen patients with prostate cancer, SBRT planning was performed using 10-MV photon beam with FF and FFF modes. The total dose prescribed to the PTV was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions. All plans were initially calculated using AAA algorithm in Eclipse treatment planning system (11.0.34), and then were re-calculated using AXB with the same MUsmore » and MLC files. The four types of plans for different algorithms and beam energies were compared in terms of homogeneity and conformity. To evaluate the radiobiological impact, the tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculations were performed. Results: For PTV, both calculation algorithms and beam modes lead to comparable homogeneity and conformity. However, the averaged TCP values in AXB plans were always lower than in AAA plans with an average difference of 5.3% and 6.1% for 10-MV FFF and FF beam, respectively. In addition, the averaged NTCP values for organs at risk (OARs) were comparable. Conclusion: This study showed that prostate SBRT plan were comparable dosimetric results with different dose calculation algorithms as well as delivery beam modes. For biological results, even though NTCP values for both calculation algorithms and beam modes were similar, AXB plans produced slightly lower TCP compared to the AAA plans.« less
  • Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the dosimetric impact of differing breast tissue compositions for electronic brachytherapy source for high dose rate accelerated partial breast irradiation. Methods: A series of Monte Carlo Simulation were created using the GEANT4 toolkit (version 10.0). The breast phantom was modeled as a semi-circle with a radius of 5.0 cm. A water balloon with a radius of 1.5 cm was located in the phantom with the Xoft AxxentTM EBT source placed at center as a point source. A mixed of two tissue types (adipose and glandular tissue) was assigned as the materials for the breast phantom withmore » different weight ratios. The proportionality of glandular and adipose tissue was simulated in four different fashions, 80/20, 70/30, 50/50 and 30/70 respectively. The custom energy spectrum for the 50 kVp XOFT source was provided via the manufacturer and used to generate incident photons. The dose distributions were recorded using a parallel three dimensional mesh with a size of 30 × 30 × 30 cm3 with 1 × 1 × 1 mm3 voxels. The simulated doses absorbed along the transverse axis were normalized at the distance of 1 cm and then compared with the calculations using standard TG-43 formalism. Results: All simulations showed underestimation of dose beyond balloon surface compared to standard TG-43 calculations. The maximum percentage differences within 2 cm distance from balloon surface were found to be 18%, 11%, 10% and 8% for the fat breast (30/70), standard breast (50/50), dense breast (70/30 and 80/20), respectively. Conclusion: The accuracy of dose calculations for low energy EBT source was limited when considering tissue heterogeneous composition. The impact of atomic number on photo-electric effect for lower energy Brachytherapy source is not accounted for and resulting in significant errors in dose calculation.« less
  • Purpose: Rotational total skin electron irradiation (RTSEI) is used in the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Due to inter-film uniformity variations the dosimetry measurement of a large electron beam of a very low energy is challenging. This work provides a method to improve the accuracy of flatness and symmetry for a very large treatment field of low electron energy used in dual beam RTSEI. Methods: RTSEI is delivered by dual angles field a gantry of ±20 degrees of 270 to cover the upper and the lower halves of the patient body with acceptable beam uniformity. The field size is inmore » the order of 230cm in vertical height and 120 cm in horizontal width and beam energy is a degraded 6 MeV (6 mm of PMMA spoiler). We utilized parallel plate chambers, Gafchromic films and OSLDs as a measuring devices for absolute dose, B-Factor, stationary and rotational percent depth dose and beam uniformity. To reduce inter-film dosimetric variation we introduced a new specific correction method to analyze beam uniformity. This correction method uses some image processing techniques combining film value before and after radiation dose to compensate the inter-variation dose response differences among films. Results: Stationary and rotational depth of dose demonstrated that the Rp is 2 cm for rotational and the maximum dose is shifted toward the surface (3mm). The dosimetry for the phantom showed that dose uniformity reduced to 3.01% for the vertical flatness and 2.35% for horizontal flatness after correction thus achieving better flatness and uniformity. The absolute dose readings of calibrated films after our correction matched with the readings from OSLD. Conclusion: The proposed correction method for Gafchromic films will be a useful tool to correct inter-film dosimetric variation for the future clinical film dosimetry verification in very large fields, allowing the optimizations of other parameters.« less
  • Purpose: Total Skin Electron Irradiation (TSEI) is a radiotherapy treatment which involves irradiating the entire body surface as homogeneously as possible. It is composed of an extensive multi-step technique in which quality management requires high consumption of resources and a fluid communication between the involved staff, necessary to improve the safety of treatment. The TG-100 proposes a new perspective of quality management in radiotherapy, presenting a systematic method of risk analysis throughout the global flow of the stages through the patient. The purpose of this work has been to apply TG-100 approach to the TSEI procedure in our institution. Methods:more » A multidisciplinary team specifically targeting TSEI procedure was formed, that met regularly and jointly developed the process map (PM), following TG-100 guidelines of the AAPM. This PM is a visual representation of the temporal flow of steps through the patient since start until the end of his stay in the radiotherapy service. Results: This is the first stage of the full risk analysis, which is being carried out in the center. The PM provides an overview of the process and facilitates the understanding of the team members who will participate in the subsequent analysis. Currently, the team is implementing the analysis of failure modes and effects (FMEA). The failure modes of each of the steps have been identified and assessors are assigning a value of severity (S), frequency of occurrence (O) and lack of detection (D) individually. To our knowledge, this is the first PM made for the TSEI. The developed PM can be useful for those centers that intend to implement the TSEI technique. Conclusion: The PM of TSEI technique has been established, as the first stage of full risk analysis, performed in a reference center in this treatment.« less