skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-F-T-57: Delivered Activity Accuracy of Radium 223 Dichloride Injections, When Being Administrated for Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer, Symptomatic Bone Metastases. The Impact of Residual Activity in the Spent Syringe and Dispensing Accuracy of Ra 223

Abstract

Purpose: To quantify the delivered activity accuracy of Radium 223 dichloride injections, when being administrated for castration – resistant prostate cancer, symptomatic bone metastases. The impact of residual activity in the spent syringe and dispensing accuracy of Ra 223. Methods: The administration is by slow intravenous injection over 1 minute followed by double flushing of the 10 mL syringe and IV with saline. Eighty (80) procedures was used to investigate variations in the activity from the amount prescribed (µCi) = 1.35 × Patient weight Kg. The Activity dispensed into a 10mL syringe using a NIST traceable Capintec CRC-25R Chamber and a cross calibrated capintec CRC-15R to measure activity in the syringe immediately before and after administration Results: The patients weight range from 121Ib to 235lb and doses ranging 74.25 µCi to 144.2 µCi. The deviation of dispensed dose vs Prescribed dose average +2.1% with a range of −1.1% to +5.7%. The Dose measured before administration ranges 79.3 µCi to 154.9 µCi. Deviation from the dispensed dose was show to average +2.9% with a range of −0.8% to +7.3%. The average residual dose post injection was 2.5 µCi or 2.2% of the pre injection activity. Ranging from 0.9 µCi to 6.2more » µCi, 0.7% to 5.4% respectively. Subtracting the residual activity from that measured activity before injection and comparing it to prescription dose was shown to have an average variation of +2.7% with a range of −0.8% to 7.4%. Conclusion: The case resulted in the 6.2 µCi maximum residual dose had two syringes. A small, 82.8 µCi activity, case resulted in the 7.4% maximum variation in measures less residual verses prescription dose. The average +2.1 % dispenses activity of Ra 223 over the prescription dosage was seen to counteract the average 2.2% residual dosage found to remain in the syringe.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Marsden Medical Physics Associates, Denville, NJ (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642305
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; CASTRATION; INTRAVENOUS INJECTION; METASTASES; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PROSTATE; RADIATION DOSES; RADIUM; RADIUM 223; SKELETON

Citation Formats

Jennings, G. SU-F-T-57: Delivered Activity Accuracy of Radium 223 Dichloride Injections, When Being Administrated for Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer, Symptomatic Bone Metastases. The Impact of Residual Activity in the Spent Syringe and Dispensing Accuracy of Ra 223. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956192.
Jennings, G. SU-F-T-57: Delivered Activity Accuracy of Radium 223 Dichloride Injections, When Being Administrated for Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer, Symptomatic Bone Metastases. The Impact of Residual Activity in the Spent Syringe and Dispensing Accuracy of Ra 223. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956192.
Jennings, G. 2016. "SU-F-T-57: Delivered Activity Accuracy of Radium 223 Dichloride Injections, When Being Administrated for Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer, Symptomatic Bone Metastases. The Impact of Residual Activity in the Spent Syringe and Dispensing Accuracy of Ra 223". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956192.
@article{osti_22642305,
title = {SU-F-T-57: Delivered Activity Accuracy of Radium 223 Dichloride Injections, When Being Administrated for Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer, Symptomatic Bone Metastases. The Impact of Residual Activity in the Spent Syringe and Dispensing Accuracy of Ra 223},
author = {Jennings, G},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To quantify the delivered activity accuracy of Radium 223 dichloride injections, when being administrated for castration – resistant prostate cancer, symptomatic bone metastases. The impact of residual activity in the spent syringe and dispensing accuracy of Ra 223. Methods: The administration is by slow intravenous injection over 1 minute followed by double flushing of the 10 mL syringe and IV with saline. Eighty (80) procedures was used to investigate variations in the activity from the amount prescribed (µCi) = 1.35 × Patient weight Kg. The Activity dispensed into a 10mL syringe using a NIST traceable Capintec CRC-25R Chamber and a cross calibrated capintec CRC-15R to measure activity in the syringe immediately before and after administration Results: The patients weight range from 121Ib to 235lb and doses ranging 74.25 µCi to 144.2 µCi. The deviation of dispensed dose vs Prescribed dose average +2.1% with a range of −1.1% to +5.7%. The Dose measured before administration ranges 79.3 µCi to 154.9 µCi. Deviation from the dispensed dose was show to average +2.9% with a range of −0.8% to +7.3%. The average residual dose post injection was 2.5 µCi or 2.2% of the pre injection activity. Ranging from 0.9 µCi to 6.2 µCi, 0.7% to 5.4% respectively. Subtracting the residual activity from that measured activity before injection and comparing it to prescription dose was shown to have an average variation of +2.7% with a range of −0.8% to 7.4%. Conclusion: The case resulted in the 6.2 µCi maximum residual dose had two syringes. A small, 82.8 µCi activity, case resulted in the 7.4% maximum variation in measures less residual verses prescription dose. The average +2.1 % dispenses activity of Ra 223 over the prescription dosage was seen to counteract the average 2.2% residual dosage found to remain in the syringe.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956192},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Prostate cancer (CaP) bone metastasis is an early event that remains inactive until later-stage progression. Reduced levels of circulating androgens, due to andropause or androgen deprivation therapies, alter androgen receptor (AR) coactivator expression. Coactivators shift the balance towards enhanced AR-mediated gene transcription that promotes progression to androgen-resistance. Disruptions in coregulators may represent a molecular switch that reactivates latent bone metastasis. Changes in AR-mediated transcription in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-resistant C4-2 cells were analyzed for AR coregulator recruitment in co-culture with Saos-2 and THP-1. The Saos-2 cell line derived from human osteosarcoma and THP-1 cell line representing human monocytes were usedmore » to display osteoblast and osteoclast activity. Increased AR activity in androgen-resistant C4-2 was due to increased AR expression and SRC1/TIF2 recruitment and decreased SMRT/NCoR expression. AR activity in both cell types was decreased over 90% when co-cultured with Saos-2 or THP-1 due to dissociation of AR from the SRC1/TIF2 and SMRT/NCoR coregulators complex, in a ligand-dependent and cell-type specific manner. In the absence of androgens, Saos-2 decreased while THP-1 increased proliferation of LNCaP cells. In contrast, both Saos-2 and THP-1 decreased proliferation of C4-2 in absence and presence of androgens. Global changes in gene expression from both CaP cell lines identified potential cell cycle and androgen regulated genes as mechanisms for changes in cell proliferation and AR-mediated transactivation in the context of bone marrow stroma cells. - Highlights: • Decreased corepressor expression change AR in androgen-resistance prostate cancer. • Bone stroma-derived cells change AR coregulator recruitment in prostate cancer. • Bone stroma cells change cell proliferation in androgen-resistant cancer cells. • Global gene expression in CaP cells is modified by bone stroma cells in co-cultures. • Potential new multi-subunit coactivator complexes for AR in CaP bone metastasis.« less
  • Purpose: Identification of metastatic bone lesions is critical in prostate cancer, where treatments may be more effective in patients with fewer lesions. This study aims characterize the distribution and spread of bone lesions and create a probability map of metastatic spread in bone. Methods: Fifty-five metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer patients received up to 3 whole-body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Lesions were identified by physician on PET/CT and contoured using a threshold of SUV>15. An atlas-based segmentation method was used to create CT regions, which determined skeletal location of lesions. Patients were divided into 3 groups with low (N<40), medium (40100) numbersmore » of lesions. A combination of articulated and deformable registrations was used to register the skeletal segments and lesions of each patient to a single skeleton. All the lesion data was then combined to make a probability map. Results: A total of 4038 metastatic lesions (mean 74, range 2–304) were identified. Skeletal regions with highest occurrence of lesions included ribs, thoracic spine, and pelvis with 21%, 19%, and 15% of the total number lesions and 8%, 18%, and 31 % of the total lesion volume, respectively. Interestingly, patients with fewer lesions were found to have a lower proportion of lesions in the ribs (9% in low vs. 27% in high number of lesions). Additionally, the probability map showed specific areas in the spine and pelvis where over 75% of patients had metastases, and other areas in the skeleton with a less than 2% of metastases. Conclusion: We identified skeletal regions with higher incidence of metastases and specific sub-regions in the skeleton that had high or low probability of occurrence of metastases. Additionally, we found that metastatic lesions in the ribs and skull occur more commonly in advanced disease. These results may have future applications in computer-aided diagnosis. Funding from the Prostate Cancer Foundation.« less
  • Purpose: To determine the incidence of pain flare following radiotherapy (RT) for painful bone metastases. Materials and Methods: Patients with bone metastases treated with RT were eligible. Worst pain scores and analgesic consumption were collected before, daily during, and for 10 days after treatment. Pain flare was defined as a 2-point increase in the worst pain score (0-10) compared to baseline with no decrease in analgesic intake, or a 25% increase in analgesic intake with no decrease in worst pain score. Pain flare was distinguished from progression of pain by requiring the worst pain score and analgesic intake return tomore » baseline levels after the increase/flare (within the 10-day follow-up period). Results: A total of 111 patients from three cancer centers were evaluable. There were 50 male and 61 female patients with a median age of 62 years (range, 40-89 years). The primary cancers were mainly breast, lung, and prostate. Most patients received a single 8 Gy (64%) or 20 Gy in five fractions (25%). The overall pain flare incidence was 44/111 (40%) during RT and within 10 days following the completion of RT. Patients treated with a single 8 Gy reported a pain flare incidence of 39% (27/70) and, with multiple fractions, 41% (17/41). Conclusion: More than one third of the enrolled patients experienced a pain flare. Identifying at-risk individuals and managing potential pain flares is crucial to achieve an optimal level of care.« less
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of variations in pelvic dimensions on the dose delivered to the target volumes and the organs at risk (OARs) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) to be treated with whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) in an attempt to define the hostile pelvis in terms of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: In 45 men with high-risk PCa to be treated with WPRT, the target volumes and the OARs were delineated, the dose constraints for the OARs were defined, and treatment plans were generated according to themore » Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0924 protocol. Six dimensions to reflect the depth, width, and height of the bony pelvis were measured, and 2 indexes were calculated from the planning computed tomographic scans. The minimum dose (D{sub min}), maximum dose (D{sub max}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}) for the target volumes and OARs and the partial volumes of each of these structures receiving a specified dose (V{sub D}) were calculated from the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The data from the DVHs were correlated with the pelvic dimensions and indexes. Results: According to an overall hostility score (OHS) calculation, 25 patients were grouped as having a hospitable pelvis and 20 as having a hostile pelvis. Regarding the OHS grouping, the DVHs for the bladder, bowel bag, left femoral head, and right femoral head differed in favor of the hospitable pelvis group, and the DVHs for the rectum differed for a range of lower doses in favor of the hospitable pelvis group. Conclusions: Pelvimetry might be used as a guide to define the challenging anatomy or the hostile pelvis in terms of treatment planning for IMRT in patients with high-risk PCa to be treated with WPRT.« less