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Title: SU-F-T-53: Treatment Planning with Inhomogeneity Correction for Intraoperative Radiotherapy Using KV X-Ray Beams

Abstract

Purpose: The current standard in dose calculation for intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) using the ZEISS Intrabeam 50 kV x-ray system is based on depth dose measurements in water and no heterogeneous tissue effect has been taken into account. We propose an algorithm for pre-treatment planning including inhomogeneity correction based on data of depth dose measurements in various tissue phantoms for kV x-rays. Methods: Direct depth dose measurements were made in air, water, inner bone and cortical bone phantoms for the Intrabeam 50 kV x-rays with a needle applicator. The data were modelled by a function of power law combining exponential with different parameters. Those phantom slabs used in the measurements were scanned to obtain CT numbers. The x-ray beam initiated from the source isocenter is ray-traced through tissues. The corresponding doses will be deposited/assigned at different depths. On the boundary of tissue/organ changes, the x-ray beam will be re-traced in new tissue/organ starting at an equivalent depth with the same dose. In principle, a volumetric dose distribution can be generated if enough directional beams are traced. In practice, a several typical rays traced may be adequate in providing estimates of maximum dose to the organ at risk and minimum dose inmore » the target volume. Results: Depth dose measurements and modeling are shown in Figure 1. The dose versus CT number is shown in Figure 2. A computer program has been written for Kypho-IORT planning using those data. A direct measurement through 2 mm solid water, 2 mm inner bone, and 1 mm solid water yields a dose rate of 7.7 Gy/min. Our calculation shows 8.1±0.4 Gy/min, consistent with the measurement within 5%. Conclusion: The proposed method can be used to more accurately calculate the dose by taking into account the heterogeneous effect. The further validation includes comparison with Monte Carlo simulation.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Northwell Health, Lake Success, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642302
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ALGORITHMS; ANIMAL TISSUES; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DEPTH DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; DOSE RATES; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PHANTOMS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SKELETON

Citation Formats

Chen, Y, Ghaly, M, Souri, S, Wang, L, Diaz, F, Cao, Y, Klein, E, and Jamshidi, A. SU-F-T-53: Treatment Planning with Inhomogeneity Correction for Intraoperative Radiotherapy Using KV X-Ray Beams. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956188.
Chen, Y, Ghaly, M, Souri, S, Wang, L, Diaz, F, Cao, Y, Klein, E, & Jamshidi, A. SU-F-T-53: Treatment Planning with Inhomogeneity Correction for Intraoperative Radiotherapy Using KV X-Ray Beams. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956188.
Chen, Y, Ghaly, M, Souri, S, Wang, L, Diaz, F, Cao, Y, Klein, E, and Jamshidi, A. 2016. "SU-F-T-53: Treatment Planning with Inhomogeneity Correction for Intraoperative Radiotherapy Using KV X-Ray Beams". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956188.
@article{osti_22642302,
title = {SU-F-T-53: Treatment Planning with Inhomogeneity Correction for Intraoperative Radiotherapy Using KV X-Ray Beams},
author = {Chen, Y and Ghaly, M and Souri, S and Wang, L and Diaz, F and Cao, Y and Klein, E and Jamshidi, A},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The current standard in dose calculation for intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) using the ZEISS Intrabeam 50 kV x-ray system is based on depth dose measurements in water and no heterogeneous tissue effect has been taken into account. We propose an algorithm for pre-treatment planning including inhomogeneity correction based on data of depth dose measurements in various tissue phantoms for kV x-rays. Methods: Direct depth dose measurements were made in air, water, inner bone and cortical bone phantoms for the Intrabeam 50 kV x-rays with a needle applicator. The data were modelled by a function of power law combining exponential with different parameters. Those phantom slabs used in the measurements were scanned to obtain CT numbers. The x-ray beam initiated from the source isocenter is ray-traced through tissues. The corresponding doses will be deposited/assigned at different depths. On the boundary of tissue/organ changes, the x-ray beam will be re-traced in new tissue/organ starting at an equivalent depth with the same dose. In principle, a volumetric dose distribution can be generated if enough directional beams are traced. In practice, a several typical rays traced may be adequate in providing estimates of maximum dose to the organ at risk and minimum dose in the target volume. Results: Depth dose measurements and modeling are shown in Figure 1. The dose versus CT number is shown in Figure 2. A computer program has been written for Kypho-IORT planning using those data. A direct measurement through 2 mm solid water, 2 mm inner bone, and 1 mm solid water yields a dose rate of 7.7 Gy/min. Our calculation shows 8.1±0.4 Gy/min, consistent with the measurement within 5%. Conclusion: The proposed method can be used to more accurately calculate the dose by taking into account the heterogeneous effect. The further validation includes comparison with Monte Carlo simulation.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956188},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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