skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-F-T-43: Prediction of Dose Increments by Brain Metastases Resection Cavity Shrinkage Model with I-125 and Cs-131 LDR Seed Implantations

Abstract

Purpose: This work aims to determine dose variability via a brain metastases resection cavity shrinkage model (RC-SM) with I-125 or Cs-131 LDR seed implantations. Methods: The RC-SM was developed to represent sequential volume changes of 95 consecutive brain metastases patients. All patients underwent serial surveillance MR and change in cavity volume was recorded for each patient. For the initial resection cavity, a prolate-ellipsoid cavity model was suggested and applied volume shrinkage rates to correspond to 1.7, 3.6, 5.9, 11.7, and 20.5 months after craniotomy. Extra-ring structure (6mm) was added on a surface of the resection volume and the same shrinkage rates were applied. Total 31 LDR seeds were evenly distributed on the surface of the resection cavity. The Amersham 6711 I-125 seed model (Oncura, Arlington Heights, IL) and the Model Cs-1 Rev2 Cs-131 seed model (IsoRay, Richland, WA) were used for TG-43U1 dose calculation and in-house-programed 3D-volumetric dose calculation system was used for resection cavity rigid model (RC-RM) and the RC-SM dose calculation. Results: The initial resection cavity volume shrunk to 25±6%, 35±6.8%, 42±7.7%, 47±9.5%, and 60±11.6%, with respect to sequential MR images post craniotomy, and the shrinkage rate (SR) was calculated as SR=56.41Xexp(−0.2024Xt)+33.99 and R-square value was 0.98. Themore » normal brain dose as assessed via the dose to the ring structure with the RC-SM showed 29.34% and 27.95% higher than the RC-RM, I-125 and Cs-131, respectively. The dose differences between I-125 and Cs-131 seeds within the same models, I-125 cases were 9.17% and 10.35% higher than Cs-131 cases, the RC-RM and the RC-SM, respectively. Conclusion: A realistic RC-SM should be considered during LDR brain seed implementation and post-implement planning to prevent potential overdose. The RC-SM calculation shows that Cs-131 is more advantageous in sparing normal brain as the resection cavity volume changes with the LDR seeds implementation.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642292
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BRACHYTHERAPY; BRAIN; CESIUM 131; IODINE 125; MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE; METASTASES; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION SOURCE IMPLANTS; RICHLAND; SHRINKAGE

Citation Formats

Han, D, Braunstein, S, Sneed, P, McDermott, M, and Ma, L. SU-F-T-43: Prediction of Dose Increments by Brain Metastases Resection Cavity Shrinkage Model with I-125 and Cs-131 LDR Seed Implantations. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956178.
Han, D, Braunstein, S, Sneed, P, McDermott, M, & Ma, L. SU-F-T-43: Prediction of Dose Increments by Brain Metastases Resection Cavity Shrinkage Model with I-125 and Cs-131 LDR Seed Implantations. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956178.
Han, D, Braunstein, S, Sneed, P, McDermott, M, and Ma, L. Wed . "SU-F-T-43: Prediction of Dose Increments by Brain Metastases Resection Cavity Shrinkage Model with I-125 and Cs-131 LDR Seed Implantations". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956178.
@article{osti_22642292,
title = {SU-F-T-43: Prediction of Dose Increments by Brain Metastases Resection Cavity Shrinkage Model with I-125 and Cs-131 LDR Seed Implantations},
author = {Han, D and Braunstein, S and Sneed, P and McDermott, M and Ma, L},
abstractNote = {Purpose: This work aims to determine dose variability via a brain metastases resection cavity shrinkage model (RC-SM) with I-125 or Cs-131 LDR seed implantations. Methods: The RC-SM was developed to represent sequential volume changes of 95 consecutive brain metastases patients. All patients underwent serial surveillance MR and change in cavity volume was recorded for each patient. For the initial resection cavity, a prolate-ellipsoid cavity model was suggested and applied volume shrinkage rates to correspond to 1.7, 3.6, 5.9, 11.7, and 20.5 months after craniotomy. Extra-ring structure (6mm) was added on a surface of the resection volume and the same shrinkage rates were applied. Total 31 LDR seeds were evenly distributed on the surface of the resection cavity. The Amersham 6711 I-125 seed model (Oncura, Arlington Heights, IL) and the Model Cs-1 Rev2 Cs-131 seed model (IsoRay, Richland, WA) were used for TG-43U1 dose calculation and in-house-programed 3D-volumetric dose calculation system was used for resection cavity rigid model (RC-RM) and the RC-SM dose calculation. Results: The initial resection cavity volume shrunk to 25±6%, 35±6.8%, 42±7.7%, 47±9.5%, and 60±11.6%, with respect to sequential MR images post craniotomy, and the shrinkage rate (SR) was calculated as SR=56.41Xexp(−0.2024Xt)+33.99 and R-square value was 0.98. The normal brain dose as assessed via the dose to the ring structure with the RC-SM showed 29.34% and 27.95% higher than the RC-RM, I-125 and Cs-131, respectively. The dose differences between I-125 and Cs-131 seeds within the same models, I-125 cases were 9.17% and 10.35% higher than Cs-131 cases, the RC-RM and the RC-SM, respectively. Conclusion: A realistic RC-SM should be considered during LDR brain seed implementation and post-implement planning to prevent potential overdose. The RC-SM calculation shows that Cs-131 is more advantageous in sparing normal brain as the resection cavity volume changes with the LDR seeds implementation.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956178},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: Permanent seed implants have traditionally been used to treat prostate, lung and head or neck cancers using I-125 and Pd-103. Cs-131, which has higher dose rate is being used to treat brain, head and/or neck cancers in our clinic, therefore, we chose to monitor the dose received by surgeons during the extensive procedure. The aims of this work are to assess the level of radiation exposure to surgeons and the instantaneous exposure at bedside and 1 m from patients. Methods: Ten patients received Cs-131 implants for recurrent brain,head and/or neck cancer; the median implanted activity, number of implanted seedsmore » and prescription dose at 0.5 cm from the perpendicular plane of the implant were: 54.3 mCi (14.52 – 77); 19 (4 – 24) and 60 Gy (range 42 – 60) respectively. Radiation exposure was recorded at bedside and 1 m from the patient using Victoreen ion chamber (Fluke Biomedical, Cleveland, OH). Exposure to surgeons was measured using TLD (Mirion Technologies (GDS), Inc., USA). Results: The median equivalent dose rate at 1 m and bedside immediately following implantation were 1.49×10-2 mSv/h (8.77×10-3–2.63×10-2) and 7.76×10-2 mSv/h (3.1×10-2– 1.53×10-1) respectively. Median equivalent dose to surgeons’ hands was 0.60 mSv (0.33 – 1.48) and no doses were detected for whole-body. Surgical reconstruction for one patient was performed 71 days post-implant and resulted in zero exposure to surgeons. Conclusion: The recorded exposure rates were low when compared with the literature. Post procedure surveys at bed site and 1 m indicated that all patients were within safe limits for discharge (< 0.05 mSv/h at 1 m). However, as a precautionary measure, patients were advised to avoid direct contact with children and pregnant women within four weeks of the implant and stay at least at 3 ft from other people. Surgeons doses were well within occupational dose limits.« less
  • Purpose: To estimate the calculation of absorbed dose to the fetus and infants from intakes of I-131 by the mother. Thus provide some advice to the radioprotection of radioactive accident. Methods: In this clinical case, a staff of nuclear medicine accidently intake I-131 during (10–12 weeks) and after pregnancy. The infant was born at full term, but both lobes of the thyroid gland were found to be absent (bilobar thyroid agenesis). It was suspected that the fetal thyroid agenesis may be related with mother’s contamination of I-131 during pregnancy. Urine samples for 24h were collected at different times after administeredmore » and radioactivity were measured to calculate the dose of intake I-131. Calculate the intake I-131 by the results of personal TLD dosimeter. We adopted the mean of two calculated results as the I-131 intake. According to the dose of intake I-131 by the mother, effective dose and absorbed dose of thyroid for mother, fetus and infant were calculated. Results: The intake of I-131 was estimated for 8.18 mCi. I-131 intake was calculated for 7.9 mCi based on data of TLD dosimeter. We adopted the mean of two results as the I-131 intake. The final result was 8.0 mCi. Effective dose and absorbed dose of thyroid for mother were 7.3Sv and 164 Gy, effective dose and absorbed dose of thyroid for fetus were 2.035 Sv and 40.7 Gy, effective dose and absorbed dose of thyroid for infant were 16.25 Sv and 355Gy. Conclusion: The intake during pregnancy was about 1mCi. The absorbed dose of thyroid of the mother was 19.5Gy, whereas the effective of infant was estimated for 40.7Gy. The function of the mother’s thyroid was normal after diagnosis. But the infant was diagnosed as bilobar thyroid agenesis.« less
  • Purpose: To develop an optimization algorithm to reduce normal brain dose by optimizing couch and collimator angles for single isocenter multiple targets treatment of stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods: Three metastatic brain lesions were retrospectively planned using single-isocenter volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Three matrices were developed to calculate the projection of each lesion on Beam’s Eye View (BEV) by the rotating couch, collimator and gantry respectively. The island blocking problem was addressed by computing the total area of open space between any two lesions with shared MLC leaf pairs. The couch and collimator angles resulting in the smallest open areas weremore » the optimized angles for each treatment arc. Two treatment plans with and without couch and collimator angle optimization were developed using the same objective functions and to achieve 99% of each target volume receiving full prescription dose of 18Gy. Plan quality was evaluated by calculating each target’s Conformity Index (CI), Gradient Index (GI), and Homogeneity index (HI), and absolute volume of normal brain V8Gy, V10Gy, V12Gy, and V14Gy. Results: Using the new couch/collimator optimization strategy, dose to normal brain tissue was reduced substantially. V8, V10, V12, and V14 decreased by 2.3%, 3.6%, 3.5%, and 6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the conformity index, gradient index, and homogeneity index between two treatment plans with and without the new optimization algorithm. Conclusion: We have developed a solution to the island blocking problem in delivering radiation to multiple brain metastases with shared isocenter. Significant reduction in dose to normal brain was achieved by using optimal couch and collimator angles that minimize total area of open space between any of the two lesions with shared MLC leaf pairs. This technique has been integrated into Eclipse treatment system using scripting API.« less
  • Purpose: To assess individual variation in heart volume and location in order to develop a prediction model of the heart. This heart prediction model will be used to calculate individualized heart doses for radiotherapy patients in epidemiological studies. Methods: Chest CT images for 30 adult male and 30 adult female patients were obtained from NIH Clinical Center. Image-analysis computer programs were used to segment the whole heart and 8 sub-regions and to measure the volume of each sub- region and the dimension of the whole heart. An analytical dosimetry method was used for the 30 adult female patients to estimatemore » mean heart dose during conventional left breast radiotherapy. Results: The average volumes of the whole heart were 803.37 cm{sup 3} (COV 18.8%) and 570.19 cm{sup 3} (COV 18.8%) for adult male and female patients, respectively, which are comparable with the international reference volumes of 807.69 cm{sup 3} for males and 596.15 cm{sup 3} for females. Some patient characteristics were strongly correlated (R{sup 2}>0.5) with heart volume and heart dimensions (e.g., Body Mass Index vs. heart depth in males: R{sup 2}=0.54; weight vs. heart width in the adult females: R{sup 2}=0.63). We found that the mean heart dose 3.805 Gy (assuming prescribed dose of 50 Gy) in the breast radiotherapy simulations of the 30 adult females could be an underestimate (up to 1.6-fold) or overestimate (up to 1.8-fold) of the patient-specific heart dose. Conclusion: The study showed the significant variation in patient heart volumes and dimensions, resulting in substantial dose errors when a single average heart model is used for retrospective dose reconstruction. We are completing a multivariate analysis to develop a prediction model of the heart. This model will increase accuracy in dose reconstruction for radiotherapy patients and allow us to individualize heart dose calculations for patients whose CT images are not available.« less
  • Purpose: RapidPlan uses a library consisting of expert plans from different patients to create a model that can predict achievable dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for new patients. The goal of this study is to investigate the impacts of model library population (plan numbers) on the DVH prediction for rectal cancer patients treated with volumetric-modulated radiotherapy (VMAT) Methods: Ninety clinically accepted rectal cancer patients’ VMAT plans were selected to establish 3 models, named as Model30, Model60 and Model90, with 30,60, and 90 plans in the model training. All plans had sufficient target coverage and bladder and femora sparings. Additional 10 patients weremore » enrolled to test the DVH prediction differences with these 3 models. The predicted DVHs from these 3 models were compared and analyzed. Results: Predicted V40 (Vx, percent of volume that received x Gy for the organs at risk) and Dmean (mean dose, cGy) of the bladder were 39.84±13.38 and 2029.4±141.6 for the Model30,37.52±16.00 and 2012.5±152.2 for the Model60, and 36.33±18.35 and 2066.5±174.3 for the Model90. Predicted V30 and Dmean of the left femur were 23.33±9.96 and 1443.3±114.5 for the Model30, 21.83±5.75 and 1436.6±61.9 for the Model60, and 20.31±4.6 and 1415.0±52.4 for the Model90.There were no significant differences among the 3 models for the bladder and left femur predictions. Predicted V40 and Dmean of the right femur were 19.86±10.00 and 1403.6±115.6 (Model30),18.97±6.19 and 1401.9±68.78 (Model60), and 21.08±7.82 and 1424.0±85.3 (Model90). Although a slight lower DVH prediction of the right femur was found on the Model60, the mean differences for V30 and mean dose were less than 2% and 1%, respectively. Conclusion: There were no significant differences among Model30, Model60 and Model90 for predicting DVHs on rectal patients treated with VMAT. The impact of plan numbers for model library might be limited for cancers with similar target shape.« less