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Title: SU-F-T-42: MRI and TRUS Image Fusion as a Mode of Generating More Accurate Prostate Contours

Abstract

Purpose: Transrectal Ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is utilized intra-operatively for LDR permanent prostate seed implant treatment planning. Prostate contouring with TRUS can be challenging at the apex and base. This study attempts to improve accuracy of prostate contouring with MRI-TRUS fusion to prevent over- or under-estimation of the prostate volume. Methods: 14 patients with previous MRI guided prostate biopsy and undergone an LDR permanent prostate seed implant have been selected. The prostate was contoured on the MRI images (1 mm slice thickness) by a radiologist. The prostate was also contoured on TRUS images (5 mm slice thickness) during LDR procedure by a urologist. MRI and TRUS images were rigidly fused manually and the prostate contours from MRI and TRUS were compared using Dice similarity coefficient, percentage volume difference and length, height and width differences. Results: The prostate volume was overestimated by 8 ± 18% (range: 34% to −25%) in TRUS images compared to MRI. The mean Dice was 0.77 ± 0.09 (range: 0.53 to 0.88). The mean difference (TRUS-MRI) in the prostate width was 0 ± 4 mm (range: −11 to 5 mm), height was −3 ± 6 mm (range: −13 to 6 mm) and length was 6 ± 6 (range:more » −10 to 16 mm). Prostate was overestimated with TRUS imaging at the base for 6 cases (mean: 8 ± 4 mm and range: 5 to 14 mm), at the apex for 6 cases (mean: 11 ± 3 mm and range: 5 to 15 mm) and 1 case was underestimated at both base and apex by 4 mm. Conclusion: Use of intra-operative TRUS and MRI image fusion can help to improve the accuracy of prostate contouring by accurately accounting for prostate over- or under-estimations, especially at the base and apex. The mean amount of discrepancy is within a range that is significant for LDR sources.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642291
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BIOPSY; BRACHYTHERAPY; IMAGES; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; PLANNING; PROSTATE; RADIATION SOURCE IMPLANTS; THICKNESS

Citation Formats

Petronek, M, Purysko, A, Balik, S, Ciezki, J, Klein, E, and Wilkinson, D. SU-F-T-42: MRI and TRUS Image Fusion as a Mode of Generating More Accurate Prostate Contours. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956177.
Petronek, M, Purysko, A, Balik, S, Ciezki, J, Klein, E, & Wilkinson, D. SU-F-T-42: MRI and TRUS Image Fusion as a Mode of Generating More Accurate Prostate Contours. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956177.
Petronek, M, Purysko, A, Balik, S, Ciezki, J, Klein, E, and Wilkinson, D. Wed . "SU-F-T-42: MRI and TRUS Image Fusion as a Mode of Generating More Accurate Prostate Contours". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956177.
@article{osti_22642291,
title = {SU-F-T-42: MRI and TRUS Image Fusion as a Mode of Generating More Accurate Prostate Contours},
author = {Petronek, M and Purysko, A and Balik, S and Ciezki, J and Klein, E and Wilkinson, D},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Transrectal Ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is utilized intra-operatively for LDR permanent prostate seed implant treatment planning. Prostate contouring with TRUS can be challenging at the apex and base. This study attempts to improve accuracy of prostate contouring with MRI-TRUS fusion to prevent over- or under-estimation of the prostate volume. Methods: 14 patients with previous MRI guided prostate biopsy and undergone an LDR permanent prostate seed implant have been selected. The prostate was contoured on the MRI images (1 mm slice thickness) by a radiologist. The prostate was also contoured on TRUS images (5 mm slice thickness) during LDR procedure by a urologist. MRI and TRUS images were rigidly fused manually and the prostate contours from MRI and TRUS were compared using Dice similarity coefficient, percentage volume difference and length, height and width differences. Results: The prostate volume was overestimated by 8 ± 18% (range: 34% to −25%) in TRUS images compared to MRI. The mean Dice was 0.77 ± 0.09 (range: 0.53 to 0.88). The mean difference (TRUS-MRI) in the prostate width was 0 ± 4 mm (range: −11 to 5 mm), height was −3 ± 6 mm (range: −13 to 6 mm) and length was 6 ± 6 (range: −10 to 16 mm). Prostate was overestimated with TRUS imaging at the base for 6 cases (mean: 8 ± 4 mm and range: 5 to 14 mm), at the apex for 6 cases (mean: 11 ± 3 mm and range: 5 to 15 mm) and 1 case was underestimated at both base and apex by 4 mm. Conclusion: Use of intra-operative TRUS and MRI image fusion can help to improve the accuracy of prostate contouring by accurately accounting for prostate over- or under-estimations, especially at the base and apex. The mean amount of discrepancy is within a range that is significant for LDR sources.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956177},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: Prostate brachytherapy is an effective treatment for early prostate cancer. The current prostate implant is limited to using 2D transrectal ultrassound (TRUS) or machenical motor driven 2D array either in the end or on the side. Real-time 3D images can improve the accuracy of the guidance of prostate implant. The concept of our system is to allow realtime full visualization of the entire prostate with the multiple transverse scan. Methods: The prototype of 3D Multiple-Transverse-Plane Transrectal Ultrasound probe (MTP-TRUS) has been designed by us and manufactured by Blatek inc. It has 7 convex linear arrays and each array hasmore » 96 elements. It is connected to cQuest Fire bird research system (Cephasonics inc.) which is a flexible and configurable ultrasound-development platform. The size of cQuest Firebird system is compact and supports the real-time wireless image transferring. A relay based mux board is designed for the cQuest Firebird system to be able to connect 672 elements. Results: The center frequency of probe is 6MHz±10%. The diameter of probe is 3cm and the length is 20cm. The element pitch is 0.205 mm. Array focus is 30mm and spacing 1.6cm. The beam data for each array was measured and met our expectation. The interface board of MTP-TURS is made and able to connect to cQuest Firebird system. The image display interface is still under the development. Our real-time needle tracking algorithm will be implemented too. Conclusion: Our MTP-TRUS system for prostate implant will be able to acquire real-time 3D images of prostate and do the real-time needle segmentation and tracking. The system is compact and have wireless function.« less
  • Purpose: To assess the initial setup accuracy in treating more than 3 vertebral body levels in spinal SBRT using a 6D couch. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed last 20 spinal SBRT patients (4 cervical, 9 thoracic, 7 lumbar/sacrum) treated in our clinic. These patients in customized immobilization device were treated in 1 or 3 fractions. Initial setup used ExacTrac and Brainlab 6D couch to align target within 1 mm and 1 degree, following by a cone beam CT (CBCT) for verification. Our current standard practice allows treating a maximum of three continuous vertebrae. Here we assess the possibility to achieve submore » millimeter setup accuracy for more than three vertebrae by examining the residual error in every slice of CBCT. The CBCT had a range of 17.5 cm, which covered 5 to 9 continuous vertebrae depending on the patient and target location. In the study, CBCT from the 1st fraction treatment was rigidly registered with the planning CT in Pinnacle. The residual setup error of a vertebra was determined by expanding the vertebra contour on the planning CT to be large enough to enclose the corresponding vertebra on CBCT. The margin of the expansion was considered as setup error. Results: Out of the 20 patients analyzed, initial setup accuracy can be achieved within 1 mm for a span of 5 or more vertebrae starting from T2 vertebra to inferior vertebra levels. 2 cervical and 2 upper thoracic patients showed the cervical spine was difficult to achieve sub millimeter accuracy for multi levels without a customized immobilization headrest. Conclusion: If the curvature of spinal columns can be reproduced in customized immobilization device during treatment as simulation, multiple continuous vertebrae can be setup within 1 mm with the use of a 6D couch.« less
  • Purpose: Automatically generated prostate MRI contours can be used to aid in image registration with CT or ultrasound and to reduce the burden of contouring for radiation treatment planning. In addition, prostate and zonal contours can assist to automate quantitative imaging features extraction and the analyses of longitudinal MRI studies. These potential gains are limited if the solutions are not compatible across different MRI vendors. The goal of this study is to characterize an atlas based automatic segmentation procedure of the prostate collected on MRI systems from multiple vendors. Methods: The prostate and peripheral zone (PZ) were manually contoured bymore » an expert radiation oncologist on T2-weighted scans acquired on both GE (n=31) and Siemens (n=33) 3T MRI systems. A leave-one-out approach was utilized where the target subject is removed from the atlas before the segmentation algorithm is initiated. The atlas-segmentation method finds the best nine matched atlas subjects and then performs a normalized intensity-based free-form deformable registration of these subjects to the target subject. These nine contours are then merged into a single contour using Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE). Contour comparisons were made using Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and Hausdorff distances. Results: Using the T2 FatSat (FS) GE datasets the atlas generated contours resulted in an average DSC of 0.83±0.06 for prostate, 0.57±0.12 for PZ and 0.75±0.09 for CG. Similar results were found when using the Siemens data with a DSC of 0.79±0.14 for prostate, 0.54±0.16 and 0.70±0.9. Contrast between prostate and surrounding anatomy and between the PZ and CG contours for both vendors demonstrated superior contrast separation; significance was found for all comparisons p-value < 0.0001. Conclusion: Atlas-based segmentation yielded promising results for all contours compared to expertly defined contours in both Siemens and GE 3T systems providing fast and automatic segmentation of the prostate. Funding Support, Disclosures, and Conflict of Interest: AS Nelson is a partial owner of MIM Software, Inc. AS Nelson, and A Swallen are current employees at MIM Software, Inc.« less
  • Purpose: To compare the performance of two deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for contour propagation and to evaluate the accuracy of DIR for use with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Methods: Five patients undergoing HDR ring and tandem brachytherapy were included in this retrospective study. All patients underwent CT simulation and replanning prior to each fraction (3–5 fractions total). CT-to-CT DIR was performed using two commercially available software platforms: SmartAdapt, Varian Medical Systems (Demons) and Velocity AI, Velocity Medical Solutions (B-spline). Fraction 1 contours were deformed and propagated to each subsequent image set and compared tomore » contours manually drawn by an expert clinician. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC), defined as, DSC(A,B)=2(AandB)/(A+B) were calculated to quantify spatial overlap between manual (A) and deformed (B) contours. Additionally, clinician-assigned visual scores were used to describe and compare the performance of each DIR method and ultimately evaluate which was more clinically acceptable. Scoring was based on a 1–5 scale—with 1 meaning, “clinically acceptable with no contour changes” and 5 meaning, “clinically unacceptable”. Results: Statistically significant differences were not observed between the two DIR algorithms. The average DSC for the bladder, rectum and rectosigmoid were 0.82±0.08, 0.67±0.13 and 0.48±0.18, respectively. The poorest contour agreement was observed for the rectosigmoid due to limited soft tissue contrast and drastic anatomical changes, i.e., organ shape/filling. Two clinicians gave nearly equivalent average scores of 2.75±0.91 for SmartAdapt and 2.75±0.94 for Velocity AI—indicating that for a majority of the cases, more than one of the three contours evaluated required major modifications. Conclusion: Limitations of both DIR algorithms resulted in inaccuracies in contour propagation in the pelvic region, thus hampering the clinical utility of this technology. Further work is required to optimize these algorithms and take advantage of the potential of DIR for HDR brachytherapy planning.« less
  • Purpose: Unlike on the daily CBCT used for the image-guided radiation therapy, the visualization of an implantable metallic fiducial marker on the planning MRI images has been a challenge due to the inherent insensitivity of metal in MRI, and very thin (∼ 1 mm or less) diameter. Here, an MRI technique to visualize a marker used for prostate cancer radiotherapy is reported. Methods: During the MRI acquisitions, a multi-shot turbo spin echo (TSE) technique (TR=3500 ms, TE=8.6 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.42x0.42x3.5 mm3) was acquired in Philips 3T Ingenia together with a T2-weighted multi-shot TSE (TR=5381 ms, TE=110 ms, ETL=17, reconmore » voxel=0.47×0.47×3 mm3) and a balanced turbo field echo (bTFE, flip angle 60, TR=2.76 ms, TE=1.3 ms, 0.85×0.85×3 mm3, NSA=4). In acquiring the MRI to visualize the fiducial marker, a particular emphasis was made to improve the spatial resolution and visibility in the generally dark, inhomogeneous prostate area by adjusting the slice profile ordering and TE values of TSE acquisition (in general, the lower value of TE in TSE acquisition generates a brighter signal but at the cost of high spatial resolution since the k-space, responsible for high spatial resolution, is filled with noisier data). Results: While clearly visible in CT, the marker was not visible in either T2-weighted TSE or bTFE, although the image qualities of both images were superior. In the new TSE acquisition (∼ a proton-density weighted image) adjusted by changing the profile ordering and the TE value, the marker was visible as a negative (but clear) contrast in the magnitude MRI, and as a positive contrast in the imaginary image of the phase-sensitive MRI. Conclusion: A metallic fiducial marker used for image guidance before prostate cancer radiotherapy can be made visible in MRI, which may facilitate more use of MRI in planning and guiding such radiation therapy.« less