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Title: SU-F-T-36: Dosimetric Comparison of Point Based Vs. Target Based Prescription for Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Cancer of the Cervix

Abstract

Purpose: Improved patient imaging used for planning the treatment of cervical cancer with Tandem and Ovoid (T&O) Intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR) now allows for 3D delineation of target volumes and organs-at-risk. However, historical data relies on the conventional point A-based planning technique. A comparative dosimetric study was performed by generating both target-based (TBP) and point-based (PBP) plans for ten clinical patients. Methods: Treatment plans created using Elekta Oncentra v. 4.3 for ten consecutive cervical cancer patients were analyzed. All patients were treated with HDR using the Utrecht T&O applicator. Both CT and MRI imaging modalities were utilized to delineate clinical target volume (CTV) and organs-at-risk (rectum, sigmoid, bladder, and small bowel). Point A (left and right), vaginal mucosa, and ICRU rectum and bladder points were defined on CT. Two plans were generated for each patient using two prescription methods (PBP and TBP). 7Gy was prescribed to each point A for each PBP plan and to the target D90% for each TBP plan. Target V90%, V100%, and V200% were evaluated. In addition, D0.1cc and D2cc were analyzed for each organ-at-risk. Differences were assessed for statistical significance (p<0.05) by use of Student’s t-test. Results: Target coverage was comparable for both planning methods,more » with each method providing adequate target coverage. TBP showed lower absolute dose to the target volume than PBP (D90% = 7.0Gy vs. 7.4Gy, p=0.028), (V200% = 10.9cc vs. 12.8cc, p=0.014), (ALeft = 6.4Gy vs. 7Gy, p=0.009), and (ARight = 6.4Gy vs. 7Gy, p=0.013). TBP also showed a statistically significant reduction in bladder, rectum, small bowel, and sigmoid doses compared to PBP. There was no statistically significant difference in vaginal mucosa or ICRU-defined rectum and bladder dose. Conclusion: Target based prescription resulted in substantially lower dose to delineated organs-at-risk compared to point based prescription, while maintaining similar target coverage.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642285
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BLADDER; BRACHYTHERAPY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DOSE RATES; HAZARDS; MUCOUS MEMBRANES; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSES; RECTUM

Citation Formats

Ashenafi, M, McDonald, D, Peng, J, Mart, C, Koch, N, Cooper, L, and Vanek, K. SU-F-T-36: Dosimetric Comparison of Point Based Vs. Target Based Prescription for Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Cancer of the Cervix. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956171.
Ashenafi, M, McDonald, D, Peng, J, Mart, C, Koch, N, Cooper, L, & Vanek, K. SU-F-T-36: Dosimetric Comparison of Point Based Vs. Target Based Prescription for Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Cancer of the Cervix. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956171.
Ashenafi, M, McDonald, D, Peng, J, Mart, C, Koch, N, Cooper, L, and Vanek, K. 2016. "SU-F-T-36: Dosimetric Comparison of Point Based Vs. Target Based Prescription for Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Cancer of the Cervix". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956171.
@article{osti_22642285,
title = {SU-F-T-36: Dosimetric Comparison of Point Based Vs. Target Based Prescription for Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Cancer of the Cervix},
author = {Ashenafi, M and McDonald, D and Peng, J and Mart, C and Koch, N and Cooper, L and Vanek, K},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Improved patient imaging used for planning the treatment of cervical cancer with Tandem and Ovoid (T&O) Intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR) now allows for 3D delineation of target volumes and organs-at-risk. However, historical data relies on the conventional point A-based planning technique. A comparative dosimetric study was performed by generating both target-based (TBP) and point-based (PBP) plans for ten clinical patients. Methods: Treatment plans created using Elekta Oncentra v. 4.3 for ten consecutive cervical cancer patients were analyzed. All patients were treated with HDR using the Utrecht T&O applicator. Both CT and MRI imaging modalities were utilized to delineate clinical target volume (CTV) and organs-at-risk (rectum, sigmoid, bladder, and small bowel). Point A (left and right), vaginal mucosa, and ICRU rectum and bladder points were defined on CT. Two plans were generated for each patient using two prescription methods (PBP and TBP). 7Gy was prescribed to each point A for each PBP plan and to the target D90% for each TBP plan. Target V90%, V100%, and V200% were evaluated. In addition, D0.1cc and D2cc were analyzed for each organ-at-risk. Differences were assessed for statistical significance (p<0.05) by use of Student’s t-test. Results: Target coverage was comparable for both planning methods, with each method providing adequate target coverage. TBP showed lower absolute dose to the target volume than PBP (D90% = 7.0Gy vs. 7.4Gy, p=0.028), (V200% = 10.9cc vs. 12.8cc, p=0.014), (ALeft = 6.4Gy vs. 7Gy, p=0.009), and (ARight = 6.4Gy vs. 7Gy, p=0.013). TBP also showed a statistically significant reduction in bladder, rectum, small bowel, and sigmoid doses compared to PBP. There was no statistically significant difference in vaginal mucosa or ICRU-defined rectum and bladder dose. Conclusion: Target based prescription resulted in substantially lower dose to delineated organs-at-risk compared to point based prescription, while maintaining similar target coverage.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956171},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • The purpose of this study was to analyze the dosimetric outcome of 3D image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer treatment and compare dose coverage of high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) to traditional Point A dose. Thirty-two patients with stage IA2-IIIB cervical cancer were treated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging-based image-guided HDR brachytherapy (IGBT). Brachytherapy dose prescription was 5.0-6.0 Gy per fraction for a total 5 fractions. The HRCTV and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated following the GYN GEC/ESTRO guidelines. Total doses for HRCTV, OARs, Point A, and Point T from external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy were summatedmore » and normalized to a biologically equivalent dose of 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2). The total planned D90 for HRCTV was 80-85 Gy, whereas the dose to 2 mL of bladder, rectum, and sigmoid was limited to 85 Gy, 75 Gy, and 75 Gy, respectively. The mean D90 and its standard deviation for HRCTV was 83.2 {+-} 4.3 Gy. This is significantly higher (p < 0.0001) than the mean value of the dose to Point A (78.6 {+-} 4.4 Gy). The dose levels of the OARs were within acceptable limits for most patients. The mean dose to 2 mL of bladder was 78.0 {+-} 6.2 Gy, whereas the mean dose to rectum and sigmoid were 57.2 {+-} 4.4 Gy and 66.9 {+-} 6.1 Gy, respectively. Image-based 3D brachytherapy provides adequate dose coverage to HRCTV, with acceptable dose to OARs in most patients. Dose to Point A was found to be significantly lower than the D90 for HRCTV calculated using the image-based technique. Paradigm shift from 2D point dose dosimetry to IGBT in HDR cervical cancer treatment needs advanced concept of evaluation in dosimetry with clinical outcome data about whether this approach improves local control and/or decreases toxicities.« less
  • Purpose: To perform an intracavitary radiotherapy (ICR) plan comparison between the conventional point A plan (conventional plan) and computed tomography (CT)-guided clinical target volume-based plan (CTV plan) by analysis of the quantitative dose-volume parameters and irradiated volumes of organs at risk in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty plans for {sup 192}Ir high-dose-rate ICR after 30-40-Gy external beam radiotherapy were investigated. CT images were acquired at the first ICR session with artifact-free applicators in place. The gross tumor volume, clinical target volume (CTV), point A, and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 38 rectal and bladdermore » points were defined on reconstructed CT images. A fractional 100% dose was prescribed to point A in the conventional plan and to the outermost point to cover all CTVs in the CTV plan. The reference volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V{sub ref}), and the dose-volume parameters of the coverage index, conformal index, and external volume index were calculated from the dose-volume histogram. The bladder, rectal point doses, and percentage of volumes receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% of the prescribed dose were also analyzed. Results: Conventional plans were performed, and patients were categorized on the basis of whether the 100% isodose line of point A prescription dose fully encompassed the CTV (Group 1, n = 20) or not (Group 2, n = 10). The mean gross tumor volume (11.6 cm{sup 3}) and CTV (24.9 cm{sup 3}) of Group 1 were smaller than the corresponding values (23.7 and 44.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively) for Group 2 (p = 0.003). The mean V{sub ref} for all patients was 129.6 cm{sup 3} for the conventional plan and 97.0 cm{sup 3} for the CTV plan (p = 0.003). The mean V{sub ref} in Group 1 decreased markedly with the CTV plan (p < 0.001). For the conventional and CTV plans in all patients, the mean coverage index, conformal index, and external volume index were 0.98 and 1.0, 0.23 and 0.34, and 3.86 and 2.15, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the conformal index and external volume index improved significantly with the CTV plan, and this improvement was more marked in Group 1. The mean values of the bladder and rectal point doses and volume fractions receiving 50%, 80%, and 100% of the reference dose did not differ between plans for all patients. The reduction in the mean rectal and bladder point doses and irradiated volumes for the CTV plan was statistically significant in Group 1. Conclusion: Computed tomography-guided CTV planning of ICR is superior to conventional point A planning in terms of conformity of target coverage and avoidance of overdosed normal tissue volume. To ascertain the potential benefit of treatment outcome, ICR with image-guided three-dimensional plans will be pursued and correlated with the dose-volume parameters.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) software for the optimization of dose distribution in patients with cervix carcinoma treated with MRI-based pulsed-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients treated with a technique using a customized vaginal mold were selected. Dose-volume parameters obtained using the IPSA method were compared with the classic manual optimization method (MOM). Target volumes and organs at risk were delineated according to the Gynecological Brachytherapy Group/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology recommendations. Because the pulsed dose rate program was based on clinical experience with lowmore » dose rate, dwell time values were required to be as homogeneous as possible. To achieve this goal, different modifications of the IPSA program were applied. Results: The first dose distribution calculated by the IPSA algorithm proposed a heterogeneous distribution of dwell time positions. The mean D90, D100, and V100 calculated with both methods did not differ significantly when the constraints were applied. For the bladder, doses calculated at the ICRU reference point derived from the MOM differed significantly from the doses calculated by the IPSA method (mean, 58.4 vs. 55 Gy respectively; p = 0.0001). For the rectum, the doses calculated at the ICRU reference point were also significantly lower with the IPSA method. Conclusions: The inverse planning method provided fast and automatic solutions for the optimization of dose distribution. However, the straightforward use of IPSA generated significant heterogeneity in dwell time values. Caution is therefore recommended in the use of inverse optimization tools with clinical relevance study of new dosimetric rules.« less
  • Purpose: To compare measurements of the uterus and cervix obtained with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transabdominal ultrasound to determine whether ultrasound can identify the brachytherapy target and be used to guide conformal brachytherapy planning and treatment for cervix cancer. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients undergoing curative treatment with radiation therapy between January 2007 and March 2012 were included in the study. Intrauterine applicators were inserted into the uterine canal while patients were anesthetized. Images were obtained by MRI and transabdominal ultrasound in the longitudinal axis of the uterus with the applicator in treatment position. Measurements were taken at themore » anterior and posterior surface of the uterus at 2.0-cm intervals along the applicator, from the external os to the tip of the applicator. Data were analyzed using Bland Altman plots examining bias and 95% limits of agreement. Results: A total of 192 patients contributed 1668 measurements of the cervix and uterus. Mean (±SD) differences of measurements between imaging modalities at the anterior and posterior uterine surface ranged from 1.5 (±3.353) mm to 3.7 (±3.856) mm, and −1.46 (±3.308) mm to 0.47 (±3.502) mm, respectively. The mean differences were less than 3 mm in the cervix. The mean differences were less than 1.5 mm at all measurement points on the posterior surface. Conclusion: Differences in the measurements of the cervix and uterus obtained by MRI and ultrasound were within clinically acceptable limits. Transabdominal ultrasound can be substituted for MRI in defining the target volume for conformal brachytherapy treatment of cervix cancer.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of medium-dose-rate (MDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 419 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were treated by radical radiotherapy with curative intent at Tokyo Women's Medical University from 1969 to 1999. LDR was used from 1969 to 1986, and MDR has been used since July 1987. When compared with LDR, fraction dose was decreased and fraction size was increased (1 or 2 fractions) for MDR to make the total dose of MDR equal to that of LDR. In general,more » the patients received a total dose of 60 to 70 Gy at Point A with external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage. In the LDR group, 32 patients had Stage I disease, 81 had Stage II, 182 had Stage III, and 29 had Stage IVA; in the MDR group, 9 patients had Stage I disease, 19 had Stage II, 55 had Stage III, and 12 had Stage IVA. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for Stages I, II, III, and IVA in the LDR group were 78%, 72%, 55%, and 34%, respectively. In the MDR group, the 5-year overall survival rates were 100%, 68%, 52%, and 42%, respectively. No significant statistical differences were seen between the two groups. The actuarial rates of late complications Grade 2 or greater at 5 years for the rectum, bladder, and small intestine in the LDR group were 11.1%, 5.8%, and 2.0%, respectively. The rates for the MDR group were 11.7%, 4.2%, and 2.6%, respectively, all of which were without statistical differences. Conclusion: These data suggest that MDR ICBT is effective, useful, and equally as good as LDR ICBT in daytime (about 5 hours) treatments of patients with cervical cancer.« less