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Title: SU-F-J-219: Predicting Ventilation Change Due to Radiation Therapy: Dependency On Pre-RT Ventilation and Effort Correction

Abstract

Purpose: Ventilation change caused by radiation therapy (RT) can be predicted using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and image registration. This study tested the dependency of predicted post-RT ventilation on effort correction and pre-RT lung function. Methods: Pre-RT and 3 month post-RT 4DCT images were obtained for 13 patients. The 4DCT images were used to create ventilation maps using a deformable image registration based Jacobian expansion calculation. The post-RT ventilation maps were predicted in four different ways using the dose delivered, pre-RT ventilation, and effort correction. The pre-RT ventilation and effort correction were toggled to determine dependency. The four different predicted ventilation maps were compared to the post-RT ventilation map calculated from image registration to establish the best prediction method. Gamma pass rates were used to compare the different maps with the criteria of 2mm distance-to-agreement and 6% ventilation difference. Paired t-tests of gamma pass rates were used to determine significant differences between the maps. Additional gamma pass rates were calculated using only voxels receiving over 20 Gy. Results: The predicted post-RT ventilation maps were in agreement with the actual post-RT maps in the following percentage of voxels averaged over all subjects: 71% with pre-RT ventilation and effort correction, 69% withmore » no pre-RT ventilation and effort correction, 60% with pre-RT ventilation and no effort correction, and 58% with no pre-RT ventilation and no effort correction. When analyzing only voxels receiving over 20 Gy, the gamma pass rates were respectively 74%, 69%, 65%, and 55%. The prediction including both pre- RT ventilation and effort correction was the only prediction with significant improvement over using no prediction (p<0.02). Conclusion: Post-RT ventilation is best predicted using both pre-RT ventilation and effort correction. This is the only prediction that provided a significant improvement on agreement. Research support from NIH grants CA166119 and CA166703, a gift from Roger Koch, and a Pilot Grant from University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
  2. University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22642246
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CORRECTIONS; DRUGS; IMAGES; LUNGS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Patton, T, Du, K, Bayouth, J, Christensen, G, and Reinhardt, J. SU-F-J-219: Predicting Ventilation Change Due to Radiation Therapy: Dependency On Pre-RT Ventilation and Effort Correction. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956127.
Patton, T, Du, K, Bayouth, J, Christensen, G, & Reinhardt, J. SU-F-J-219: Predicting Ventilation Change Due to Radiation Therapy: Dependency On Pre-RT Ventilation and Effort Correction. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956127.
Patton, T, Du, K, Bayouth, J, Christensen, G, and Reinhardt, J. 2016. "SU-F-J-219: Predicting Ventilation Change Due to Radiation Therapy: Dependency On Pre-RT Ventilation and Effort Correction". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956127.
@article{osti_22642246,
title = {SU-F-J-219: Predicting Ventilation Change Due to Radiation Therapy: Dependency On Pre-RT Ventilation and Effort Correction},
author = {Patton, T and Du, K and Bayouth, J and Christensen, G and Reinhardt, J},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Ventilation change caused by radiation therapy (RT) can be predicted using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and image registration. This study tested the dependency of predicted post-RT ventilation on effort correction and pre-RT lung function. Methods: Pre-RT and 3 month post-RT 4DCT images were obtained for 13 patients. The 4DCT images were used to create ventilation maps using a deformable image registration based Jacobian expansion calculation. The post-RT ventilation maps were predicted in four different ways using the dose delivered, pre-RT ventilation, and effort correction. The pre-RT ventilation and effort correction were toggled to determine dependency. The four different predicted ventilation maps were compared to the post-RT ventilation map calculated from image registration to establish the best prediction method. Gamma pass rates were used to compare the different maps with the criteria of 2mm distance-to-agreement and 6% ventilation difference. Paired t-tests of gamma pass rates were used to determine significant differences between the maps. Additional gamma pass rates were calculated using only voxels receiving over 20 Gy. Results: The predicted post-RT ventilation maps were in agreement with the actual post-RT maps in the following percentage of voxels averaged over all subjects: 71% with pre-RT ventilation and effort correction, 69% with no pre-RT ventilation and effort correction, 60% with pre-RT ventilation and no effort correction, and 58% with no pre-RT ventilation and no effort correction. When analyzing only voxels receiving over 20 Gy, the gamma pass rates were respectively 74%, 69%, 65%, and 55%. The prediction including both pre- RT ventilation and effort correction was the only prediction with significant improvement over using no prediction (p<0.02). Conclusion: Post-RT ventilation is best predicted using both pre-RT ventilation and effort correction. This is the only prediction that provided a significant improvement on agreement. Research support from NIH grants CA166119 and CA166703, a gift from Roger Koch, and a Pilot Grant from University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956127},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop an accurate and effective technique to predict and monitor volume changes of the tumor and organs at risk (OARs) from daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). Methods: While CBCT is typically used to minimize the patient setup error, its poor image quality impedes accurate monitoring of daily anatomical changes in radiotherapy. Reconstruction artifacts in CBCT often cause undesirable errors in registration-based contour propagation from the planning CT, a conventional way to estimate anatomical changes. To improve the registration and segmentation accuracy, we developed a new deformable image registration (DIR) that iteratively corrects CBCTmore » intensities using slice-based histogram matching during the registration process. Three popular DIR algorithms (hierarchical B-spline, demons, optical flow) augmented by the intensity correction were implemented on a graphics processing unit for efficient computation, and their performances were evaluated on six head and neck (HN) cancer cases. Four trained scientists manually contoured nodal gross tumor volume (GTV) on the planning CT and every other fraction CBCTs for each case, to which the propagated GTV contours by DIR were compared. The performance was also compared with commercial software, VelocityAI (Varian Medical Systems Inc.). Results: Manual contouring showed significant variations, [-76, +141]% from the mean of all four sets of contours. The volume differences (mean±std in cc) between the average manual segmentation and four automatic segmentations are 3.70±2.30(B-spline), 1.25±1.78(demons), 0.93±1.14(optical flow), and 4.39±3.86 (VelocityAI). In comparison to the average volume of the manual segmentations, the proposed approach significantly reduced the estimation error by 9%(B-spline), 38%(demons), and 51%(optical flow) over the conventional mutual information based method (VelocityAI). Conclusion: The proposed CT-CBCT registration with local CBCT intensity correction can accurately predict the tumor volume change with reduced errors. Although demonstrated only on HN nodal GTVs, the results imply improved accuracy for other critical structures. This work was supported by NIH/NCI under grant R42CA137886.« less
  • Purpose: Longitudinal changes in lung ventilation following radiation therapy can be mapped using four-dimensional computed tomography(4DCT) and image registration. This study aimed to predict ventilation changes caused by radiation therapy(RT) as a function of pre-RT ventilation and delivered dose. Methods: 4DCT images were acquired before and 3 months after radiation therapy for 13 subjects. Jacobian ventilation maps were calculated from the 4DCT images, warped to a common coordinate system, and a Jacobian ratio map was computed voxel-by-voxel as the ratio of post-RT to pre-RT Jacobian calculations. A leave-one-out method was used to build a response model for each subject: post-RTmore » to pre-RT Jacobian ratio data and dose distributions of 12 subjects were applied to the subject’s pre-RT Jacobian map to predict the post-RT Jacobian. The predicted Jacobian map was compared to the actual post-RT Jacobian map to evaluate efficacy. Within this cohort, 8 subjects had repeat pre-RT scans that were compared as a reference for no ventilation change. Maps were compared using gamma pass rate criteria of 2mm distance-to-agreement and 6% ventilation difference. Gamma pass rates were compared using paired t-tests to determine significant differences. Further analysis masked non-radiation induced changes by excluding voxels below specified dose thresholds. Results: Visual inspection demonstrates the predicted post-RT ventilation map is similar to the actual map in magnitude and distribution. Quantitatively, the percentage of voxels in agreement when excluding voxels receiving below specified doses are: 74%/20Gy, 73%/10Gy, 73%/5Gy, and 71%/0Gy. By comparison, repeat scans produced 73% of voxels within the 6%/2mm criteria. The agreement of the actual post-RT maps with the predicted maps was significantly better than agreement with pre-RT maps (p<0.02). Conclusion: This work validates that significant changes to ventilation post-RT can be predicted. The differences between the predicted and actual outcome are similar to differences between repeat scans with equivalent ventilation. This work was supported by NIH grant CA166703 and a Pilot Grant from University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.« less
  • Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and image registration can be used to determine regional lung ventilation changes after radiation therapy (RT). This study aimed to determine if lung ventilation change following radiation therapy was affected by the pre-RT ventilation of the lung. Methods: 13 subjects had three 4DCT scans: two repeat scans acquired before RT and one three months after RT. Regional ventilation was computed using Jacobian determinant calculations on the registered 4DCT images. The post-RT ventilation map was divided by the pre-RT ventilation map to get a voxel-by-voxel Jacobian ratio map depicting ventilation change over the course of RT.more » Jacobian ratio change was compared over the range of delivered doses. The first pre-RT ventilation image was divided by the second to establish a control for Jacobian ratio change without radiation delivered. The functional change between scans was assessed using histograms of the Jacobian ratios. Results: There were significantly (p < 0.05) more voxels that had a large decrease in Jacobian ratio in the post-RT divided by pre-RT map (15.6%) than the control (13.2%). There were also significantly (p < .01) more voxels that had a large increase in Jacobian ratio (16.2%) when compared to control (13.3%). Lung regions with low function (<10% expansion by Jacobian) showed a slight linear reduction in expansion (0.2%/10 Gy delivered), while high function regions (>10% expansion) showed a greater response (1.2% reduction/10 Gy). Contiguous high function regions > 1 liter occurred in 11 of 13 subjects. Conclusion: There is a significant change in regional ventilation following a course of radiation therapy. The change in Jacobian following RT is dependent both on the delivered dose and the initial ventilation of the lung tissue: high functioning lung has greater ventilation loss for equivalent radiation doses. Substantial regions of high function lung tissue are prevalent. Research support from NIH grants CA166119 and CA166703, a gift from Roger Koch, and a Pilot Grant from University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.« less
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