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Title: SU-F-J-186: Enabling Adaptive IMPT with CBCT-Based Dose Recalculation for H&N and Prostate Cancer Patients

Abstract

Purpose: To enable adaptive intensity modulated proton therapy for sites sensitive to inter-fractional changes on the basis of accurate CBCT-based proton dose calculations. To this aim two CBCT intensity correction methods are considered: planning CT (pCT) to CBCT DIR and projection correction based on pCT DIR prior. Methods: 3 H&N and 3 prostate cancer patients with CBCT images and corresponding projections were used in this study, in addition to pCT and re-planning CT (rpCT) images (H&N only). A virtual CT (vCT) was generated by pCT to CBCT DIR. In a second approach, the vCT was used as prior for scatter correction of the CBCT projections to yield a CBCTcor image. BEV 2D range maps of SFUD IMPT plans were compared. For the prostate cases, the geometric accuracy of the vCT was also evaluated by contour comparison to physician delineation of the CBCTcor and original CBCT. Results: SFUD dose calculations on vCT and CBCTcor were found to be within 3mm for 97% to 99% of 2D range maps. Median range differences compared to rpCT were below 0.5mm. Analysis showed that the DIR-based vCT approach exhibits inaccuracies in the pelvic region due to the very low soft-tissue contrast in the CBCT. Themore » CBCTcor approach yielded results closer to the original CBCT in terms of DICE coefficients than the vCT (median 0.91 vs 0.81) for targets and OARs. In general, the CBCTcor approach was less affected by inaccuracies of the DIR used during the generation of the vCT prior. Conclusion: Both techniques yield 3D CBCT images with intensities equivalent to diagnostic CT and appear suitable for IMPT dose calculation for most sites. For H&N cases, no considerable differences between the two techniques were found, while improved results of the CBCTcor were observed for pelvic cases due to the reduced sensitivity to registration inaccuracies. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (MAP); Bundesministerium fur Bildung und Forschung (01IB13001)« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3]; ; ; ; ; ;  [4];  [5];  [6]; ;  [1]
  1. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Garching b. Muenchen (Germany)
  2. (Germany)
  3. Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)
  4. LMU Munich, Munich (Germany)
  5. University Lyon, Lyon (France)
  6. Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22634782
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ACCURACY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CORRECTIONS; IMAGES; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PLANNING; PROSTATE; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SENSITIVITY

Citation Formats

Kurz, C, LMU Munich, Munich, Park, Y, Winey, B, Sharp, G, Kamp, F, Reiner, M, Nijhuis, R, Ganswindt, U, Thieke, C, Belka, C, Rit, S, Hansen, D, Parodi, K, and Landry, G. SU-F-J-186: Enabling Adaptive IMPT with CBCT-Based Dose Recalculation for H&N and Prostate Cancer Patients. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956094.
Kurz, C, LMU Munich, Munich, Park, Y, Winey, B, Sharp, G, Kamp, F, Reiner, M, Nijhuis, R, Ganswindt, U, Thieke, C, Belka, C, Rit, S, Hansen, D, Parodi, K, & Landry, G. SU-F-J-186: Enabling Adaptive IMPT with CBCT-Based Dose Recalculation for H&N and Prostate Cancer Patients. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956094.
Kurz, C, LMU Munich, Munich, Park, Y, Winey, B, Sharp, G, Kamp, F, Reiner, M, Nijhuis, R, Ganswindt, U, Thieke, C, Belka, C, Rit, S, Hansen, D, Parodi, K, and Landry, G. Wed . "SU-F-J-186: Enabling Adaptive IMPT with CBCT-Based Dose Recalculation for H&N and Prostate Cancer Patients". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956094.
@article{osti_22634782,
title = {SU-F-J-186: Enabling Adaptive IMPT with CBCT-Based Dose Recalculation for H&N and Prostate Cancer Patients},
author = {Kurz, C and LMU Munich, Munich and Park, Y and Winey, B and Sharp, G and Kamp, F and Reiner, M and Nijhuis, R and Ganswindt, U and Thieke, C and Belka, C and Rit, S and Hansen, D and Parodi, K and Landry, G},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To enable adaptive intensity modulated proton therapy for sites sensitive to inter-fractional changes on the basis of accurate CBCT-based proton dose calculations. To this aim two CBCT intensity correction methods are considered: planning CT (pCT) to CBCT DIR and projection correction based on pCT DIR prior. Methods: 3 H&N and 3 prostate cancer patients with CBCT images and corresponding projections were used in this study, in addition to pCT and re-planning CT (rpCT) images (H&N only). A virtual CT (vCT) was generated by pCT to CBCT DIR. In a second approach, the vCT was used as prior for scatter correction of the CBCT projections to yield a CBCTcor image. BEV 2D range maps of SFUD IMPT plans were compared. For the prostate cases, the geometric accuracy of the vCT was also evaluated by contour comparison to physician delineation of the CBCTcor and original CBCT. Results: SFUD dose calculations on vCT and CBCTcor were found to be within 3mm for 97% to 99% of 2D range maps. Median range differences compared to rpCT were below 0.5mm. Analysis showed that the DIR-based vCT approach exhibits inaccuracies in the pelvic region due to the very low soft-tissue contrast in the CBCT. The CBCTcor approach yielded results closer to the original CBCT in terms of DICE coefficients than the vCT (median 0.91 vs 0.81) for targets and OARs. In general, the CBCTcor approach was less affected by inaccuracies of the DIR used during the generation of the vCT prior. Conclusion: Both techniques yield 3D CBCT images with intensities equivalent to diagnostic CT and appear suitable for IMPT dose calculation for most sites. For H&N cases, no considerable differences between the two techniques were found, while improved results of the CBCTcor were observed for pelvic cases due to the reduced sensitivity to registration inaccuracies. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (MAP); Bundesministerium fur Bildung und Forschung (01IB13001)},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956094},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: Retrospective calculation of the delivered proton dose in prostate cancer patients based on a unique dataset of daily CT images. Methods: Inter-fractional motion in prostate cancer patients treated at our proton facility is counteracted by water-filled endorectal ballon and bladder filling protocol. Typical plans (XiO, Elekta Instruments AB, Stockholm) for 74 Gy(RBE) sequential boost treatment in 37 fractions include two series of opposing lateral double-scattered proton beams covering the respective iCTV. Stability of fiducial markers and anatomy were checked in 12 patients by daily scheduled in-room control CT (cCT) after immobilization and positioning according to bony anatomy utilizing orthogonalmore » X-ray. In RayStation 4.6 (RaySearch Laboritories AB, Stockholm), all cCTs are delineated retrospectively and the treatment plans were recalculated on the planning CT and the registered cCTs. All fraction doses were accumulated on the planning CT after deformable registration. Parameters of delivered dose to iCTV (D98%>95%, D2%<107%), bladder (V75Gy<15%, V70Gy<25%, V65Gy<30%), rectum (V70Gy<10%, V50Gy<40%) and femoral heads (V50Gy<5%) are compared to those in the treatment plan. Intra-therapy variation is represented in DVH bands. Results: No alarming differences were observed between planned and retrospectively accumulated dose: iCTV constraints were met, except for one patient (D98%=94.6% in non-boosted iCTV). Considered bladder and femoral head values were below the limits. Rectum V70Gy was slightly exceeded (<11.3%) in two patients. First intra-therapy variability analysis in 4 patients showed no timedependent parameter drift, revealed strongest variability for bladder dose. In some fractions, iCTV coverage (D98%) and rectum V70Gy was missed. Conclusion: Double scattered proton plans are accurately delivered to prostate cancer patients due to fractionation effects and the applied precise positioning and immobilization protocols. As a result of rare interventions after daily 3D imaging of the first 12 patients, in-room CT frequency for prostate cancer patients was reduced. The presented study supports this decision. The authors acknowledge the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research for funding the High Precision Radiotherapy Group at the OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology (BMBF- 03Z1N51).« less
  • Purpose: Using daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) to develop principal component analysis (PCA) models of anatomical changes in head and neck (H&N) patients and to assess the possibility of using these prospectively in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: Planning CT (pCT) images of 4 H&N patients were deformed to model several different systematic changes in patient anatomy during the course of the radiation therapy (RT). A Pinnacle plugin was used to linearly interpolate the systematic change in patient for the 35 fraction RT course and to generate a set of 35 synthetic CBCTs. Each synthetic CBCT represents the systematic changemore » in patient anatomy for each fraction. Deformation vector fields (DVFs) were acquired between the pCT and synthetic CBCTs with random fraction-to-fraction changes were superimposed on the DVFs. A patient-specific PCA model was built using these DVFs containing systematic plus random changes. It was hypothesized that resulting eigenDVFs (EDVFs) with largest eigenvalues represent the major anatomical deformations during the course of treatment. Results: For all 4 patients, the PCA model provided different results depending on the type and size of systematic change in patient’s body. PCA was more successful in capturing the systematic changes early in the treatment course when these were of a larger scale with respect to the random fraction-to-fraction changes in patient’s anatomy. For smaller scale systematic changes, random changes in patient could completely “hide” the systematic change. Conclusion: The leading EDVF from the patientspecific PCA models could tentatively be identified as a major systematic change during treatment if the systematic change is large enough with respect to random fraction-to-fraction changes. Otherwise, leading EDVF could not represent systematic changes reliably. This work is expected to facilitate development of population-based PCA models that can be used to prospectively identify significant anatomical changes early in treatment. This work is supported in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA.« less
  • Purpose: The aim of this study is to monitor the volume changes of bladder and rectum and evaluate the dosimetric changes of bladder and rectum using daily cone-beam CT for prostate radiotherapy. Methods: The data of this study were obtained from 12 patients, totally 222 CBCTs. All the volume of the bladder and the rectum on the CBCT were normalized to the bladder and the rectum on their own original CT to monitory the volume changes. To evaluate dose delivered to the OARs, volumes that receive 70Gy (V70Gy), 60Gy, 50Gy, 40Gy and 30Gy are calculated for the bladder and themore » rectum, V20Gy and V10Gy for rectum additionally. And the deviation of the mean dose to the bladder and the rectum are also chosen as the evaluation parameter. Linear regression analysis was performed to identify the mean dose change of the volume change using SPSS 19. Results: The results show that the variances of the normalize volume of the bladder and the rectum are 0.15–0.58 and 0.13–0.50. The variances of V70Gy, V60Gy, V50Gy, V40Gy and V30Gy of bladder are bigger than rectum for 11 patients. The linear regression analysis indicated a negative correlation between the volume and the mean dose of the bladder (p < 0.05). A 10% increase in bladder volume will cause 5.1% (±4.3%) reduction in mean dose. Conclusion: The bladder volume change is more significant than that for rectum for the prostate cancer patient. The volume changes of rectum are not significant except air gap in the rectum. Bladder volume varies will cause significant dose change. The bladder volume monitoring before fractional treatment delivery would be crucial for accuracy dose delivery.« less
  • Purpose: To reduce radiation dose to the patients, tube current modulation (TCM) method has been actively used in diagnostic CT systems. However, TCM method has not yet been applied to a kV-CBCT system on a LINAC machine. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the use of TCM method is desirable in kV-CBCT system for IGRT. We have developed an attenuation-based tube current modulation (a-TCM) method using the prior knowledge of treatment CT image of a patient. Methods: Patients go through a diagnostic CT scan for RT planning; therefore, using this prior information of CT images, one canmore » estimate the total attenuation of an x-ray through the patient body in a CBCT setting for radiation therapy. We performed a numerical study incorporating major factors into account such as polychromatic x-ray, scatter, noise, and bow-tie filter to demonstrate that a-TCM method can produce equivalent quality of images at reduced imaging radiation doses. Using the CT projector program, 680 projection images of the pediatric XCAT phantom were obtained both in conventional scanning condition, i.e., without modulating the tube current, and in the proposed a-TCM scanning condition. FDK reconstruction algorithm was used for image reconstruction, and the organ dose due to imaging radiation has been calculated in both cases and compared using GATE/Geant4 simulation toolkit. Results: Reconstructed CT images in the a-TCM method showed similar SSIM values and noise properties to the reference images acquired by the conventional CBCT. In addition, reduction of organ doses ranged from 12% to 27%. Conclusion: We have successfully demonstrated the feasibility and dosimetric merit of the a-TCM method for kV-CBCT, and envision that it can be a useful option of CBCT scanning that provides patient dose reduction without degrading image quality.« less
  • Purpose: The use of CBCT for dose calculation is limited by its HU inaccuracy from increased scatter. This study presents a method to generate synthetic CT images from CBCT data by a probabilistic classification that may be robust to CBCT noise. The feasibility of using the synthetic CT for dose calculation is evaluated in IMRT for unilateral H&N cancer. Methods: In the training phase, a fuzzy c-means classification was performed on HU vectors (CBCT, CT) of planning CT and registered day-1 CBCT image pair. Using the resulting centroid CBCT and CT values for five classified “tissue” types, a synthetic CTmore » for a daily CBCT was created by classifying each CBCT voxel to obtain its probability belonging to each tissue class, then assigning a CT HU with a probability-weighted summation of the classes’ CT centroids. Two synthetic CTs from a CBCT were generated: s-CT using the centroids from classification of individual patient CBCT/CT data; s2-CT using the same centroids for all patients to investigate the applicability of group-based centroids. IMRT dose calculations for five patients were performed on the synthetic CTs and compared with CT-planning doses by dose-volume statistics. Results: DVH curves of PTVs and critical organs calculated on s-CT and s2-CT agree with those from planning-CT within 3%, while doses calculated with heterogeneity off or on raw CBCT show DVH differences up to 15%. The differences in PTV D95% and spinal cord max are 0.6±0.6% and 0.6±0.3% for s-CT, and 1.6±1.7% and 1.9±1.7% for s2-CT. Gamma analysis (2%/2mm) shows 97.5±1.6% and 97.6±1.6% pass rates for using s-CTs and s2-CTs compared with CT-based doses, respectively. Conclusion: CBCT-synthesized CTs using individual or group-based centroids resulted in dose calculations that are comparable to CT-planning dose for unilateral H&N cancer. The method may provide a tool for accurate dose calculation based on daily CBCT.« less