skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: SU-F-J-163: In Vivo Quantification of Sequence Parameter Effect On Geometric Distortion Caused by Implanted Titanium Brachytherapy Applicator

Abstract

Purpose: The use of MR to plan and evaluate brachytherapy treatment for cervical cancer is increasing given the availability of MR conditional or safe applicators and MRI’s proven superiority to CT for characterizing soft tissue lesions. The titanium applicators, however, cause geometric distortions or imaging artifacts, which reduce the utility of MRI for dosimetry. We sought to quantify the observed volume of the same applicator on a previously optimized T2 sequence in comparison to the conventional T2 sequence and CT obtained for brachytherapy planning. Methods: Prior work with testing in phantoms showed that increases in readout bandwidth yielded reductions in artifact area and distortion measurements even with voxel increases. Following IRB approval, nine patients with titanium tandem & ovoid applicator (Varian Medical Systems) in place were scanned with a standard periprocedural protocol which included sagittal T2 fast spin echo (FSE) acquisition (res 0.98×0.78×4.0 mm{sup 3}; BW 200Hz). An additional T2-weighted FSE sequence (res 0.98×0.98×3–4 mm{sup 3}; BW500Hz) with increased readout bandwidth, readout voxel size, and echo train length was added to the protocol. Volume measurements of the applicator (from tip to cervical stop) were hand-segmented in Velocity AI 3.1 (Velocity Medical Solutions) for the two T2 FSE sequences and amore » planning CT obtained shortly after MRI. Differences were analyzed using a paired t-test. Results: Average apparent volumes of the applicator on standard T2 sequence, decreased bandwidth T2 sequence and CT were 5.922±1.283 cm{sup 3}, 4.544±1.524 cm3, and 2.304±0.509 cm{sup 3} respectively. Conclusion: Apparent volumes of a brachytherapy applicator can be compared in vivo. The modified sequence results in decreased apparent size of the cervical applicator. Both MR sequence volumes were larger than the planning CT, which was expected. Future work will focus on the diagnostic quality of the new sequence and quantifying any geometric shifts after CT to MRI registration based on anatomical landmarks.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22634764
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ANIMAL TISSUES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BRACHYTHERAPY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; IN VIVO; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PHANTOMS; READOUT SYSTEMS; TITANIUM

Citation Formats

Sullivan, T, Diak, A, Surucu, M, Yacoub, J, Harkenrider, M, and Shea, S. SU-F-J-163: In Vivo Quantification of Sequence Parameter Effect On Geometric Distortion Caused by Implanted Titanium Brachytherapy Applicator. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956071.
Sullivan, T, Diak, A, Surucu, M, Yacoub, J, Harkenrider, M, & Shea, S. SU-F-J-163: In Vivo Quantification of Sequence Parameter Effect On Geometric Distortion Caused by Implanted Titanium Brachytherapy Applicator. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956071.
Sullivan, T, Diak, A, Surucu, M, Yacoub, J, Harkenrider, M, and Shea, S. Wed . "SU-F-J-163: In Vivo Quantification of Sequence Parameter Effect On Geometric Distortion Caused by Implanted Titanium Brachytherapy Applicator". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956071.
@article{osti_22634764,
title = {SU-F-J-163: In Vivo Quantification of Sequence Parameter Effect On Geometric Distortion Caused by Implanted Titanium Brachytherapy Applicator},
author = {Sullivan, T and Diak, A and Surucu, M and Yacoub, J and Harkenrider, M and Shea, S},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The use of MR to plan and evaluate brachytherapy treatment for cervical cancer is increasing given the availability of MR conditional or safe applicators and MRI’s proven superiority to CT for characterizing soft tissue lesions. The titanium applicators, however, cause geometric distortions or imaging artifacts, which reduce the utility of MRI for dosimetry. We sought to quantify the observed volume of the same applicator on a previously optimized T2 sequence in comparison to the conventional T2 sequence and CT obtained for brachytherapy planning. Methods: Prior work with testing in phantoms showed that increases in readout bandwidth yielded reductions in artifact area and distortion measurements even with voxel increases. Following IRB approval, nine patients with titanium tandem & ovoid applicator (Varian Medical Systems) in place were scanned with a standard periprocedural protocol which included sagittal T2 fast spin echo (FSE) acquisition (res 0.98×0.78×4.0 mm{sup 3}; BW 200Hz). An additional T2-weighted FSE sequence (res 0.98×0.98×3–4 mm{sup 3}; BW500Hz) with increased readout bandwidth, readout voxel size, and echo train length was added to the protocol. Volume measurements of the applicator (from tip to cervical stop) were hand-segmented in Velocity AI 3.1 (Velocity Medical Solutions) for the two T2 FSE sequences and a planning CT obtained shortly after MRI. Differences were analyzed using a paired t-test. Results: Average apparent volumes of the applicator on standard T2 sequence, decreased bandwidth T2 sequence and CT were 5.922±1.283 cm{sup 3}, 4.544±1.524 cm3, and 2.304±0.509 cm{sup 3} respectively. Conclusion: Apparent volumes of a brachytherapy applicator can be compared in vivo. The modified sequence results in decreased apparent size of the cervical applicator. Both MR sequence volumes were larger than the planning CT, which was expected. Future work will focus on the diagnostic quality of the new sequence and quantifying any geometric shifts after CT to MRI registration based on anatomical landmarks.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956071},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: To investigate the effect of readout bandwidth and voxel size on the appearance of distortion artifacts caused by a titanium brachytherapy applicator. Methods: An acrylic phantom was constructed to rigidly hold a MR conditional, titanium Fletcher-Suit-Delclos-style applicator set (Varian Medical Systems) for imaging on CT (Philips Brilliance) and 1.5T MRI (Siemens Magnetom Aera). Several variants of MRI parameters were tried for 2D T2-weighted turbo spin echo imaging in comparison against the standard clinical protocol with the criteria to keep relative SNR loss less than 20% and imaging time as short as possible. Two 3D sequences were also used formore » comparison with similar parameters. The applicator tandem was segmented on axial CT images (0.4×0.4×1.5mm {sup 3} resolution) and the CT images were registered to the 3D MR images in Eclipse (Varian). The applicator volume was then overlaid on all MRI sets in 3D-Slicer and distances were measured from the tandem tip to the MRI artifact edge in right/left/superior and anterior/posterior/superior directions from coronal and sagittal 2D acquisitions, respectively, or 3D data reformats. Artifact regions were also manually contoured in coronal/sagittal orientations for area measurements. Results: As would be expected, reductions in voxel size and increases in readout bandwidth reduced artifact size (average max artifact length decreased by 0.95 mm and average max area decrease by 0.27 cm{sup 2}). Interestingly, bandwidth increases yielded reductions in area (0.19 cm{sup 2}) and in distance measurements (1 mm) even with voxel increases, as compared to a standard protocol. This could be useful when high performance protocols are not feasible due to long imaging times. Conclusion: We have characterized artifacts caused by cervical brachytherapy applicator across multiple sequence parameters at 1.5T. Future work will focus on finalizing an optimal protocol that balances artifact reduction with imaging time and then testing this new protocol in patients.« less
  • Purpose: MRI has superb soft tissue contrast but is also known for geometric distortions. The concerns and uncertainty about MRI’s geometric distortion have contributed to the hesitation of using only MRI for simulation in radiation therapy. There are two major categories of geometric distortion in MRI; system related and patient related. In this presentation, we studied the impact of system-related geometric distortion on dose distribution in a digital body phantom under an MR-Linac environment. Methods: Residual geometric distortion (after built-in geometric correction) was modeled based on phantom measurements of the system-related geometric distortions of a MRI scanner of a combinedmore » MR guided Radiation Therapy (MRgRT) system. A digital oval shaped phantom (40×25 cm) as well as one ellipsoid shaped tumor volume was created to simulate a simplified human body. The simulated tumor volume was positioned at several locations between the isocenter and the body surface. CT numbers in HUs that approximate soft tissue and tumor were assigned to the respective regions in the digital phantom. To study the effect of geometric distortion caused by system imperfections, an IMRT plan was optimized with the distorted image set with the B field. Dose distributions were re-calculated on the undistorted image set with the B field (as in MR-Linac). Results: The maximum discrepancies in both body contour and tumor boundary was less than 2 mm, which leads to small dose distribution change. For the target in the center, coverage was reduced from 98.8% (with distortion) to 98.2%; for the other peripheral target coverage was reduced from 98.4% to 95.9%. Conclusion: System related geometric distortions over the 40×25 area were within 2mm and the resulted dosimetric effects were minor for the two tumor locations in the phantom. Patient study will be needed for further investigation. The authors received a corporate research grant from Elekta.« less
  • Purpose: MRI is increasingly used as a single imaging modality for brachytherapy treatment planning. The presence of a brachytherapy applicator may cause distortions in the images, especially at higher field strengths. Our aim is to develop a procedure to quantify these distortions theoretically for any MR-sequence and to verify the estimated deformations for clinical sequences. Methods: Image distortions due to perturbation of the B0-field are proportional to the ratio of the induced frequency shift and the read-out bandwidth of the applied sequence. By reconstructing a frequency-shift map from the phase data from a multi-echo sequence, distortions can be calculated formore » any MR-sequence. Verification of this method for estimating distortions was performed by acquiring images with opposing read-out directions and consequently opposing distortions. The applicator shift can be determined by rigidly matching these images. Clinically, T2W-TSE-images are used for this purpose. For pre-clinical tests, EPI-sequences with narrow read-out bandwidth (19.5–47.5Hz), consequently large distortions, were added to the set of clinical MRsequences. To quantify deformations of the Utrecht Interstitial CT/MR applicator (Elekta Brachytherapy) on a Philips Ingenia 3T MRI, pre-clinical tests were performed in a phantom with the applicator in water, followed by clinical validation. Results: Deformations observed in the narrow bandwidth EPI-images were well predicted using the frequency-shift, the latter giving an overestimation up to 30%/up to 1 voxel. For clinically applied MR-sequences distortions were well below the voxel size. In patient setup distortions determined from the frequency-shift map were at sub-voxel level (<0.7mm). Using T2W-images larger distortions were found (1–2mm). This discrepancy was caused by patient movement between/during acquisition of the T2W-images with opposing read-out directions. Conclusion: Phantom experiments demonstrated the feasibility of a clinical procedure for quantification of MR-image distortions for any MR-sequence. In a clinical set-up the distortions from a Utrecht interstitial CT/MR applicator are sub-voxel level. This work was partially funded by Elekta Brachytherpy.« less
  • Purpose: There is strong evidence relating post-implant dosimetry for low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate seed brachytherapy to local control rates. The delineation of the prostate on CT images, however, represents a challenge due to the lack of soft tissue contrast in order to identify the prostate borders. This study aims at quantifying the sensitivity of clinically relevant dosimetric parameters to uncertainty in the contouring of prostate. Methods: CT images, post-op plans and contours of a cohort of patients (n=43) (low risk=55.8%, intermediate risk=39.5%, high risk=4.7%), who had received prostate seed brachytherapy, were imported into MIM Symphony treatment planning system. The prostate contoursmore » in post-implant CT images were expanded/contracted uniformly for margins of ±1.00 mm, ±2.00 mm, ±3.00 mm, ±4.00 mm and ±5.00 mm. The values for V100 and D90 were extracted from Dose Volume Histograms for each contour and compared. Results: Significant changes were observed in the values of D90 and V100 as well as the number of suboptimal plans for expansion or contraction margins of only few millimeters. Evaluation of coverage based on D90 was found to be less sensitive to expansion errors compared to V100. D90 led to a lower number of implants incorrectly identified with insufficient coverage for expanded contours which increases the accuracy of post-implant QA using CT images compared to V100. Conclusion: In order to establish a successful post implant QA for LDR prostate seed brachytherapy, it is necessary to identify the low and high thresholds of important dose metrics of the target volume such as D90 and V100. Since these parameters are sensitive to target volume definition, accurate identification of prostate borders would help to improve accuracy and predictive value of the post-implant QA process. In this respect, use of imaging modalities such as MRI where prostate is well delineated should prove useful.« less
  • Purpose: To study the feasibility of employing deformable registration methods for accurate rectum dose volume parameters calculation and their potentials in revealing rectum dose-toxicity between complication and non-complication cervical cancer patients with brachytherapy treatment. Method and Materials: Data from 60 patients treated with BT including planning images, treatment plans, and follow-up clinical exam were retrospectively collected. Among them, 12 patients complained about hematochezia were further examined with colonoscopy and scored as Grade 1–3 complication (CP). Meanwhile, another 12 non-complication (NCP) patients were selected as a reference group. To seek for potential gains in rectum toxicity prediction when fractional anatomical deformationsmore » are account for, the rectum dose volume parameters D0.1/1/2cc of the selected patients were retrospectively computed by three different approaches: the simple “worstcase scenario” (WS) addition method, an intensity-based deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm-Demons, and a more accurate, recent developed local topology preserved non-rigid point matching algorithm (TOP). Statistical significance of the differences between rectum doses of the CP group and the NCP group were tested by a two-tailed t-test and results were considered to be statistically significant if p < 0.05. Results: For the D0.1cc, no statistical differences are found between the CP and NCP group in all three methods. For the D1cc, dose difference is not detected by the WS method, however, statistical differences between the two groups are observed by both Demons and TOP, and more evident in TOP. For the D2cc, the CP and NCP cases are statistically significance of the difference for all three methods but more pronounced with TOP. Conclusion: In this study, we calculated the rectum D0.1/1/2cc by simple WS addition and two DIR methods and seek for gains in rectum toxicity prediction. The results favor the claim that accurate dose deformation and summation tend to be more sensitive in unveiling the dose-toxicity relationship. This work is supported in part by grant from VARIAN MEDICAL SYSTEMS INC, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (no 81428019 and no 81301940), the Guangdong Natural Science Foundation (2015A030313302)and the 2015 Pearl River S&T Nova Program of Guangzhou (201506010096).« less