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Title: SU-F-J-162: Is Bulky Electron Density Assignment Appropriatefor MRI-Only Based Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer?

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the appropriateness of bulky electron density assisment for MRI-only treatment planning for lung cancer via comparing dosimetric difference between MRI- and CT-based plans. Methods: Planning 4DCTs acquired for six representative lung cancer patients were used to generate CT-based IMRT plans. To avoid the effect of anatomic difference between CT and MRI, MRI-based plans were generated using CTs by forcing the relative electron density (rED) of organ specific values from ICRU report 46 and using the mean rED value of the internal target volume (ITV) of the patient for the ITV. Both CT and “MRI” plans were generated using a research planning system (Monaco, Elekta) employing Monte Carlo dose calculation the following dose-volume-parameters (DVPs): D99 – dose delivered to 99% of the ITV/PTV volume; D95; D5; D1; Vpd –volume receiving the prescription dose; V5 – volume of normal lung irradiated > 5 Gy; and V20. The percent point difference and dose difference was used for comparison for Vpd-V5-V20 and D99-D1, respectively. Four additional plans per patient were calculated with rEDITV = 0.6 and 1.0 and rEDlung = 0.1 and 0.5. Results: Noticeable differences in the ITV and PTV point doses and DVPs were observed. Variations in Vpd rangedmore » from 0.0–6.4% and 0.32–18.3% for the ITV and PTV, respectively. The ITV and PTV variations in D99, D95, D5 and D1 were 0.15–3.2 Gy. The normal lung V5 & V20 variations were no larger than 1.9%. In some instances, varying the rEDITV between rEDmean, 0.6 and 1.0 resulted in D95 increases ranging from 3.9–6.3%. Uniform rED assignment on normal lung affected DVPs of ITV and PTV by 4.0–9.8% and 0.3–19.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The commonly-used uniform rED assignment in MRI-only based planning may not be appropriate for lung-cancer. A voxel based method, e.g. synthetic CT generated from MRI data, is required. This work was partially funded by Elekta, Inc.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22634763
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; ELECTRON DENSITY; ICRU; IRRADIATION; LUNGS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Prior, P, Chen, X, Johnstone, C, Gore, E, and Li, X. SU-F-J-162: Is Bulky Electron Density Assignment Appropriatefor MRI-Only Based Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer?. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956070.
Prior, P, Chen, X, Johnstone, C, Gore, E, & Li, X. SU-F-J-162: Is Bulky Electron Density Assignment Appropriatefor MRI-Only Based Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer?. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956070.
Prior, P, Chen, X, Johnstone, C, Gore, E, and Li, X. Wed . "SU-F-J-162: Is Bulky Electron Density Assignment Appropriatefor MRI-Only Based Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer?". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956070.
@article{osti_22634763,
title = {SU-F-J-162: Is Bulky Electron Density Assignment Appropriatefor MRI-Only Based Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer?},
author = {Prior, P and Chen, X and Johnstone, C and Gore, E and Li, X},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To assess the appropriateness of bulky electron density assisment for MRI-only treatment planning for lung cancer via comparing dosimetric difference between MRI- and CT-based plans. Methods: Planning 4DCTs acquired for six representative lung cancer patients were used to generate CT-based IMRT plans. To avoid the effect of anatomic difference between CT and MRI, MRI-based plans were generated using CTs by forcing the relative electron density (rED) of organ specific values from ICRU report 46 and using the mean rED value of the internal target volume (ITV) of the patient for the ITV. Both CT and “MRI” plans were generated using a research planning system (Monaco, Elekta) employing Monte Carlo dose calculation the following dose-volume-parameters (DVPs): D99 – dose delivered to 99% of the ITV/PTV volume; D95; D5; D1; Vpd –volume receiving the prescription dose; V5 – volume of normal lung irradiated > 5 Gy; and V20. The percent point difference and dose difference was used for comparison for Vpd-V5-V20 and D99-D1, respectively. Four additional plans per patient were calculated with rEDITV = 0.6 and 1.0 and rEDlung = 0.1 and 0.5. Results: Noticeable differences in the ITV and PTV point doses and DVPs were observed. Variations in Vpd ranged from 0.0–6.4% and 0.32–18.3% for the ITV and PTV, respectively. The ITV and PTV variations in D99, D95, D5 and D1 were 0.15–3.2 Gy. The normal lung V5 & V20 variations were no larger than 1.9%. In some instances, varying the rEDITV between rEDmean, 0.6 and 1.0 resulted in D95 increases ranging from 3.9–6.3%. Uniform rED assignment on normal lung affected DVPs of ITV and PTV by 4.0–9.8% and 0.3–19.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The commonly-used uniform rED assignment in MRI-only based planning may not be appropriate for lung-cancer. A voxel based method, e.g. synthetic CT generated from MRI data, is required. This work was partially funded by Elekta, Inc.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956070},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • Purpose: : To investigate dosimetric differences between MRI- and CT-based IMRT planning for prostate cancer, the impact of a magnetic field in a MRI-Linac, and to explore the feasibility of IMRT planning based on MRI alone. Methods: IMRT plans were generated based on CT and MRI images acquired on two representative prostate-cancer patients using clinical dose volume constraints. A research planning system (Monaco, Elekta), which employs a Monte Carlo dose engine and includes a perpendicular magnetic field of 1.5T from an MRI-Linac, was used. Bulk electron density assignments based on organ-specific values from ICRU 46 were used to convert MRImore » (T2) to pseudo CT. With the same beam configuration as in the original CT plan, 5 additional plans were generated based on CT or MRI, with or without optimization (i.e., just recalculation) and with or without the magnetic field. The plan quality in terms of commonly used dose volume (DV) parameters for all plans was compared. The statistical uncertainty on dose was < 1%. Results: For plans with the same contour set but without re-optimization, the DV parameters were different from those for the original CT plan, mostly less than 5% with a few exceptions. These differences were reduced to mostly less than 3% when the plans were re-optimized. For plans with contours from MRI, the differences in the DV parameters varied depending on the difference in the contours as compared to CT. For the optimized plans with contours from MR, the differences for PTV were less than 3%. Conclusion: The prostate IMRT plans based on MRI-only for a MR-Linac were practically similar as compared to the CT plan under the same beam and optimization configuration if the difference on the structure delineation is excluded, indicating the feasibility of using MRI-only for prostate IMRT.« less
  • Purpose: With the increasing use of MRI simulation and the advent of MRI-guided delivery, it is desirable to use MRI only for treatment planning. In this study, we assess the dosimetric difference between MRI- and CTbased IMRT planning for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Planning CTs and MRIs acquired for a representative pancreatic cancer patient were used. MRI-based planning utilized forced relative electron density (rED) assignment of organ specific values from IRCU report 46, where rED = 1.029 for PTV and a rED = 1.036 for non-specified tissue (NST). Six IMRT plans were generated with clinical dose-volume (DV) constraints using a researchmore » Monaco planning system employing Monte Carlo dose calculation with optional perpendicular magnetic field (MF) of 1.5T. The following five plans were generated and compared with the planning CT: 1.) CT plan with MF and dose recalculation without optimization; 2.) MRI (T2) plan with target and OARs redrawn based on MRI, forced rED, no MF, and recalculation without optimization; 3.) Similar as in 2 but with MF; 4.) MRI plan with MF but without optimization; and 5.) Similar as in 4 but with optimization. Results: Generally, noticeable differences in PTV point doses and DV parameters (DVPs) between the CT-and MRI-based plans with and without the MF were observed. These differences between the optimized plans were generally small, mostly within 2%. Larger differences were observed in point doses and mean doses for certain OARs between the CT and MRI plan, mostly due to differences between image acquisition times. Conclusion: MRI only based IMRT planning for pancreatic cancer is feasible. The differences observed between the optimized CT and MRI plans with or without the MF were practically negligible if excluding the differences between MRI and CT defined structures.« less
  • Purpose: Automatically derive electron density of tissues using MR images and generate a pseudo-CT for MR-only treatment planning of brain tumours. Methods: 20 stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) patients’ T1-weighted MR images and CT images were retrospectively acquired. First, a semi-automated tissue segmentation algorithm was developed to differentiate tissues with similar MR intensities and large differences in electron densities. The method started with approximately 12 slices of manually contoured spatial regions containing sinuses and airways, then air, bone, brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and eyes were automatically segmented using edge detection and anatomical information including location, shape, tissue uniformity and relative intensity distribution.more » Next, soft tissues - muscle and fat were segmented based on their relative intensity histogram. Finally, intensities of voxels in each segmented tissue were mapped into their electron density range to generate pseudo-CT by linearly fitting their relative intensity histograms. Co-registered CT was used as a ground truth. The bone segmentations of pseudo-CT were compared with those of co-registered CT obtained by using a 300HU threshold. The average distances between voxels on external edges of the skull of pseudo-CT and CT in three axial, coronal and sagittal slices with the largest width of skull were calculated. The mean absolute electron density (in Hounsfield unit) difference of voxels in each segmented tissues was calculated. Results: The average of distances between voxels on external skull from pseudo-CT and CT were 0.6±1.1mm (mean±1SD). The mean absolute electron density differences for bone, brain, CSF, muscle and fat are 78±114 HU, and 21±8 HU, 14±29 HU, 57±37 HU, and 31±63 HU, respectively. Conclusion: The semi-automated MR electron density mapping technique was developed using T1-weighted MR images. The generated pseudo-CT is comparable to that of CT in terms of anatomical position of tissues and similarity of electron density assignment. This method can allow MR-only treatment planning.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate MR-only treatment planning for brain Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) based on pseudo-CT (pCT) generation using one set of T1-weighted MRI. Methods: T1-weighted MR and CT images from 12 patients who were eligible for brain SABR were retrospectively acquired for this study. MR-based pCT was generated by using a newly in-house developed algorithm based on MR tissue segmentation and voxel-based electron density (ED) assignment (pCTv). pCTs using bulk density assignment (pCTb where bone and soft tissue were assigned 800HU and 0HU,respectively), and water density assignment (pCTw where all tissues were assigned 0HU) were generated for comparison of EDmore » assignment techniques. The pCTs were registered with CTs and contours of radiation targets and Organs-at-Risk (OARs) from clinical CT-based plans were copied to co-registered pCTs. Volumetric-Modulated-Arc-Therapy(VMAT) plans were independently created for pCTv and CT using the same optimization settings and a prescription (50Gy/10 fractions) to planning-target-volume (PTV) mean dose. pCTv-based plans and CT-based plans were compared with dosimetry parameters and monitor units (MUs). Beam fluence maps of CT-based plans were transferred to co-registered pCTs, and dose was recalculated on pCTs. Dose distribution agreement between pCTs and CT plans were quantified using Gamma analysis (2%/2mm, 1%/1mm with a 10% cut-off threshold) in axial, coronal and sagittal planes across PTV. Results: The average differences of PTV mean and maximum doses, and monitor units between independently created pCTv-based and CT-based plans were 0.5%, 1.5% and 1.1%, respectively. Gamma analysis of dose distributions of the pCTs and the CT calculated using the same fluence map resulted in average agreements of 92.6%/79.1%/52.6% with 1%/1mm criterion, and 98.7%/97.4%/71.5% with 2%/2mm criterion, for pCTv/CT, pCTb/CT and pCTw/CT, respectively. Conclusion: Plans produced on Voxel-based pCT is dosimetrically more similar to CT plans than bulk assignment-based pCTs. MR-only treatment planning using voxel-based pCT generated from T1-wieghted MRI may be feasible.« less
  • Purpose: We report on an automated segmentation algorithm for defining radiation therapy target volumes using spectroscopic MR images (sMRI) acquired at nominal voxel resolution of 100 microliters. Methods: Wholebrain sMRI combining 3D echo-planar spectroscopic imaging, generalized auto-calibrating partially-parallel acquisitions, and elliptical k-space encoding were conducted on 3T MRI scanner with 32-channel head coil array creating images. Metabolite maps generated include choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), as well as Cho/NAA, Cho/Cr, and NAA/Cr ratio maps. Automated segmentation was achieved by concomitantly considering sMRI metabolite maps with standard contrast enhancing (CE) imaging in a pipeline that first uses the watermore » signal for skull stripping. Subsequently, an initial blob of tumor region is identified by searching for regions of FLAIR abnormalities that also display reduced NAA activity using a mean ratio correlation and morphological filters. These regions are used as starting point for a geodesic level-set refinement that adapts the initial blob to the fine details specific to each metabolite. Results: Accuracy of the segmentation model was tested on a cohort of 12 patients that had sMRI datasets acquired pre, mid and post-treatment, providing a broad range of enhancement patterns. Compared to classical imaging, where heterogeneity in the tumor appearance and shape across posed a greater challenge to the algorithm, sMRI’s regions of abnormal activity were easily detected in the sMRI metabolite maps when combining the detail available in the standard imaging with the local enhancement produced by the metabolites. Results can be imported in the treatment planning, leading in general increase in the target volumes (GTV60) when using sMRI+CE MRI compared to the standard CE MRI alone. Conclusion: Integration of automated segmentation of sMRI metabolite maps into planning is feasible and will likely streamline acceptance of this new acquisition modality in clinical practice.« less