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Title: SU-F-J-162: Is Bulky Electron Density Assignment Appropriatefor MRI-Only Based Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer?

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the appropriateness of bulky electron density assisment for MRI-only treatment planning for lung cancer via comparing dosimetric difference between MRI- and CT-based plans. Methods: Planning 4DCTs acquired for six representative lung cancer patients were used to generate CT-based IMRT plans. To avoid the effect of anatomic difference between CT and MRI, MRI-based plans were generated using CTs by forcing the relative electron density (rED) of organ specific values from ICRU report 46 and using the mean rED value of the internal target volume (ITV) of the patient for the ITV. Both CT and “MRI” plans were generated using a research planning system (Monaco, Elekta) employing Monte Carlo dose calculation the following dose-volume-parameters (DVPs): D99 – dose delivered to 99% of the ITV/PTV volume; D95; D5; D1; Vpd –volume receiving the prescription dose; V5 – volume of normal lung irradiated > 5 Gy; and V20. The percent point difference and dose difference was used for comparison for Vpd-V5-V20 and D99-D1, respectively. Four additional plans per patient were calculated with rEDITV = 0.6 and 1.0 and rEDlung = 0.1 and 0.5. Results: Noticeable differences in the ITV and PTV point doses and DVPs were observed. Variations in Vpd rangedmore » from 0.0–6.4% and 0.32–18.3% for the ITV and PTV, respectively. The ITV and PTV variations in D99, D95, D5 and D1 were 0.15–3.2 Gy. The normal lung V5 & V20 variations were no larger than 1.9%. In some instances, varying the rEDITV between rEDmean, 0.6 and 1.0 resulted in D95 increases ranging from 3.9–6.3%. Uniform rED assignment on normal lung affected DVPs of ITV and PTV by 4.0–9.8% and 0.3–19.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The commonly-used uniform rED assignment in MRI-only based planning may not be appropriate for lung-cancer. A voxel based method, e.g. synthetic CT generated from MRI data, is required. This work was partially funded by Elekta, Inc.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22634763
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; ELECTRON DENSITY; ICRU; IRRADIATION; LUNGS; MONTE CARLO METHOD; NEOPLASMS; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Prior, P, Chen, X, Johnstone, C, Gore, E, and Li, X. SU-F-J-162: Is Bulky Electron Density Assignment Appropriatefor MRI-Only Based Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer?. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956070.
Prior, P, Chen, X, Johnstone, C, Gore, E, & Li, X. SU-F-J-162: Is Bulky Electron Density Assignment Appropriatefor MRI-Only Based Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer?. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956070.
Prior, P, Chen, X, Johnstone, C, Gore, E, and Li, X. 2016. "SU-F-J-162: Is Bulky Electron Density Assignment Appropriatefor MRI-Only Based Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer?". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956070.
@article{osti_22634763,
title = {SU-F-J-162: Is Bulky Electron Density Assignment Appropriatefor MRI-Only Based Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer?},
author = {Prior, P and Chen, X and Johnstone, C and Gore, E and Li, X},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To assess the appropriateness of bulky electron density assisment for MRI-only treatment planning for lung cancer via comparing dosimetric difference between MRI- and CT-based plans. Methods: Planning 4DCTs acquired for six representative lung cancer patients were used to generate CT-based IMRT plans. To avoid the effect of anatomic difference between CT and MRI, MRI-based plans were generated using CTs by forcing the relative electron density (rED) of organ specific values from ICRU report 46 and using the mean rED value of the internal target volume (ITV) of the patient for the ITV. Both CT and “MRI” plans were generated using a research planning system (Monaco, Elekta) employing Monte Carlo dose calculation the following dose-volume-parameters (DVPs): D99 – dose delivered to 99% of the ITV/PTV volume; D95; D5; D1; Vpd –volume receiving the prescription dose; V5 – volume of normal lung irradiated > 5 Gy; and V20. The percent point difference and dose difference was used for comparison for Vpd-V5-V20 and D99-D1, respectively. Four additional plans per patient were calculated with rEDITV = 0.6 and 1.0 and rEDlung = 0.1 and 0.5. Results: Noticeable differences in the ITV and PTV point doses and DVPs were observed. Variations in Vpd ranged from 0.0–6.4% and 0.32–18.3% for the ITV and PTV, respectively. The ITV and PTV variations in D99, D95, D5 and D1 were 0.15–3.2 Gy. The normal lung V5 & V20 variations were no larger than 1.9%. In some instances, varying the rEDITV between rEDmean, 0.6 and 1.0 resulted in D95 increases ranging from 3.9–6.3%. Uniform rED assignment on normal lung affected DVPs of ITV and PTV by 4.0–9.8% and 0.3–19.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The commonly-used uniform rED assignment in MRI-only based planning may not be appropriate for lung-cancer. A voxel based method, e.g. synthetic CT generated from MRI data, is required. This work was partially funded by Elekta, Inc.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956070},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • The purpose of this study was to explore the treatment planning methods of spatially fractionated megavoltage grid therapy for treating bulky lung tumors using multileaf collimator (MLC). A total of 5 patients with lung cancer who had gross tumor volumes ranging from 277 to 635 cm{sup 3} were retrospectively chosen for this study. The tumors were from 6.5 to 9.6 cm at shortest dimension. Several techniques using either electronic compensation or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were used to create a variety of grid therapy plans on the Eclipse treatment planning system. The dose prescription point was calculated to the volume,more » and a dose of 20 Gy with 6-MV/15-MV beams was used in each plan. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) curves were obtained to evaluate dosimetric characteristics. In addition, DVH curves from a commercially available cerrobend grid collimator were also used for comparison. The linear-quadratic radiobiological response model was used to assess therapeutic ratios (TRs) and equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for all generated plans. A total of 6 different grid therapy plans were created for each patient. Overall, 4 plans had different electronic compensation techniques: Ecomps-Tubes, Ecomps-Circles, Ecomps-Squares, and Ecomps-Weave; the other 2 plans used IMRT and IMRT-Weave techniques. The DVH curves and TRs demonstrated that these MLC-based grid therapy plans can achieve dosimetric properties very similar to those of the cerrobend grid collimator. However, the MLC-based plans have larger EUDs than those with the cerrobend grid collimator. In addition, the field shaping can be performed for targets of any shape in MLC-based plans. Thus, they can deliver a more conformal dose to the targets and spare normal structures better than the cerrobend grid collimator can. The plans generated by the MLC technique demonstrated the advantage over the standard cerrobend grid collimator on accommodating targets and sparing normal structures. Overall, 6 different plans showed 6 different dosimetric parameters. However, an optimal grid therapy plan selection from among these 6 types requires more information from clinical trials and radiobiological studies.« less
  • Purpose: Automatically derive electron density of tissues using MR images and generate a pseudo-CT for MR-only treatment planning of brain tumours. Methods: 20 stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) patients’ T1-weighted MR images and CT images were retrospectively acquired. First, a semi-automated tissue segmentation algorithm was developed to differentiate tissues with similar MR intensities and large differences in electron densities. The method started with approximately 12 slices of manually contoured spatial regions containing sinuses and airways, then air, bone, brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and eyes were automatically segmented using edge detection and anatomical information including location, shape, tissue uniformity and relative intensity distribution.more » Next, soft tissues - muscle and fat were segmented based on their relative intensity histogram. Finally, intensities of voxels in each segmented tissue were mapped into their electron density range to generate pseudo-CT by linearly fitting their relative intensity histograms. Co-registered CT was used as a ground truth. The bone segmentations of pseudo-CT were compared with those of co-registered CT obtained by using a 300HU threshold. The average distances between voxels on external edges of the skull of pseudo-CT and CT in three axial, coronal and sagittal slices with the largest width of skull were calculated. The mean absolute electron density (in Hounsfield unit) difference of voxels in each segmented tissues was calculated. Results: The average of distances between voxels on external skull from pseudo-CT and CT were 0.6±1.1mm (mean±1SD). The mean absolute electron density differences for bone, brain, CSF, muscle and fat are 78±114 HU, and 21±8 HU, 14±29 HU, 57±37 HU, and 31±63 HU, respectively. Conclusion: The semi-automated MR electron density mapping technique was developed using T1-weighted MR images. The generated pseudo-CT is comparable to that of CT in terms of anatomical position of tissues and similarity of electron density assignment. This method can allow MR-only treatment planning.« less
  • Primary breast cancer is generally treated with opposed radiation beams oriented tangentially with respect to the breast. This technique attempts to minimize the dose to the lung and other normal tissues, while at the same time producing a uniform dose distribution throughout the irradiated breast. Although a part of the lung is always included in the tangential breast fields, the effect of this low density tissue on the dose distribution is rarely taken into account. In the present work, the effect of lung density correction on the dose distribution resulting from tangential breast fields is analyzed. Treatment plans for amore » series of 34 patients treated for breast cancer have been performed using CT data. To study the effect of density corrections on the tangential field treatment plans for these patients, eight separate treatment plans for each patient have been optimized. For each of four photon energies (/sup 60/Co, and 4, 6, and 10 MV X rays), treatment plans have been optimized for each patient when density correction is employed, and when unit density is assumed. Four additional dose calculations have been obtained for each patient corresponding to use of the unit density plan, but with density corrections employed in the calculation. The effects that density correction has on the wedge angles used, on the maximum dose (''hot spot'') for each of several cross-sectional cuts, on the prescription isodose level which is chosen for each plan, and on homogeneity of the dose distribution over the target volume are all analyzed for the above described plans.« less
  • Purpose: To describe the development of a knowledge-based treatment planning model for lung cancer patients treated with SBRT, and to evaluate the model performance and applicability to different planning techniques and tumor locations. Methods: 105 lung SBRT plans previously treated at our institution were included in the development of the model using Varian’s RapidPlan DVH estimation algorithm. The model was trained with a combination of IMRT, VMAT, and 3D–CRT techniques. Tumor locations encompassed lesions located centrally vs peripherally (43:62), upper vs lower (62:43), and anterior vs posterior lobes (60:45). The model performance was validated with 25 cases independent of themore » training set, for both IMRT and VMAT. Model generated plans were created with only one optimization and no planner intervention. The original, general model was also divided into four separate models according to tumor location. The model was also applied using different beam templates to further improve workflow. Dose differences to targets and organs-at-risk were evaluated. Results: IMRT and VMAT RapidPlan generated plans were comparable to clinical plans with respect to target coverage and several OARs. Spinal cord dose was lowered in the model-based plans by 1Gy compared to the clinical plans, p=0.008. Splitting the model according to tumor location resulted in insignificant differences in DVH estimation. The peripheral model decreased esophagus dose to the central lesions by 0.5Gy compared to the original model, p=0.025, and the posterior model increased dose to the spinal cord by 1Gy compared to the anterior model, p=0.001. All template beam plans met OAR criteria, with 1Gy increases noted in maximum heart dose for the 9-field plans, p=0.04. Conclusion: A RapidPlan knowledge-based model for lung SBRT produces comparable results to clinical plans, with increased consistency and greater efficiency. The model encompasses both IMRT and VMAT techniques, differing tumor locations, and beam arrangements. Research supported in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto CA.« less
  • We evaluated the feasibility of planning stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for large central early-stage non−small cell lung cancer with a tri-cobalt-60 (tri-{sup 60}Co) system equipped with real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance, as compared to linear accelerator (LINAC)–based SBRT. In all, 20 patients with large central early-stage non−small cell lung cancer who were treated between 2010 and 2015 with LINAC-based SBRT were replanned using a tri-{sup 60}Co system for a prescription dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions. Doses to organs at risk were evaluated based on established MD Anderson constraints for central lung SBRT. R{sub 100} values were calculatedmore » as the total tissue volume receiving 100% of the dose (V{sub 100}) divided by the planning target volume and compared to assess dose conformity. Dosimetric comparisons between LINAC-based and tri-{sup 60}Co SBRT plans were performed using Student's t-test and Wilcoxon Ranks test. Blinded reviews by radiation oncologists were performed to assess the suitability of both plans for clinical delivery. The mean planning target volume was 48.3 cc (range: 12.1 to 139.4 cc). Of the tri-{sup 60}Co SBRT plans, a mean 97.4% of dosimetric parameters per patient met MD Anderson dose constraints, whereas a mean 98.8% of dosimetric parameters per patient were met with LINAC-based SBRT planning (p = 0.056). R{sub 100} values were similar between both plans (1.20 vs 1.21, p = 0.79). Upon blinded review by 4 radiation oncologists, an average of 90% of the tri-{sup 60}Co SBRT plans were considered acceptable for clinical delivery compared with 100% of the corresponding LINAC-based SBRT plans (p = 0.17). SBRT planning using the tri-{sup 60}Co system with built-in MRI is feasible and achieves clinically acceptable plans for most central lung patients, with similar target dose conformity and organ at risk dosimetry. The added benefit of real-time MRI-guided therapy may further optimize tumor targeting while improving normal tissue sparing, which warrants further investigation in a prospective feasibility clinical trial.« less