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Title: SU-F-J-161: Prostate Contouring in Patients with Bilateral Hip Prostheses: Impact of Using Artifact-Reduced CT Images and MRI

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the usefulness of metal artifact reduction in CT images of patients with bilateral hip prostheses (BHP) for contouring the prostate and determine if the inclusion of MR images provides additional benefits. Methods: Five patients with BHP were CT scanned using our clinical protocol (140kV, 300mAs, 3mm slices, 1.5mm increment, Philips Medical Systems, OH). Images were reconstructed with the orthopaedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) algorithm. MRI scanning was then performed (1.5T, GE Healthcare, WI) with a flat table-top (T{sub 2}-weighted, inherent body coil, FRFSE, 3mm slices with 0mm gap). All images were transferred to Pinnacle (Version 9.2, Philips Medical Systems). For each patient, two data sets were produced: one containing the O-MAR-corrected CT images and another containing fused MRI and O-MAR-corrected CT images. Four genito-urinary radiation oncologists contoured the prostate of each patient on the O-MAR-corrected CT data. Two weeks later, they contoured the prostate on the fused data set, blinded to all other contours. During each contouring session, the oncologists reported their confidence in the contours (1=very confident, 3=not confident) and the contouring difficulty that they experienced (1=really easy, 4=very challenging). Prostate volumes were computed from the contours and the conformity index was used to evaluate inter-observermore » variability. Results: Larger prostate volumes were found on the O-MAR-corrected CT set than on the fused set (p< 0.05, median=36.9cm{sup 3} vs. 26.63 cm{sup 3}). No significant differences were noted in the inter-observer variability between the two data sets (p=0.3). Contouring difficulty decreased with the addition of MRI (p<0.05) while the radiation oncologists reported more confidence in their contours when MRI was fused with the O-MAR-corrected CT data (p<0.05). Conclusion: This preliminary work demonstrated that, while O-MAR correction to CT images improves visualization of anatomy, the addition of MRI enhanced the oncologists’ confidence in contouring the prostate in patients with BHP.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22634762
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Physics; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; ALGORITHMS; ANATOMY; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CORRECTIONS; IMAGE PROCESSING; IMAGES; MEDICAL PERSONNEL; METALS; NMR IMAGING; PATIENTS; PROSTATE; PROSTHESES

Citation Formats

Elzibak, A, Loblaw, A, Morton, G, Vesprini, D, Liu, S, Chung, H, and Davidson, M. SU-F-J-161: Prostate Contouring in Patients with Bilateral Hip Prostheses: Impact of Using Artifact-Reduced CT Images and MRI. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4956069.
Elzibak, A, Loblaw, A, Morton, G, Vesprini, D, Liu, S, Chung, H, & Davidson, M. SU-F-J-161: Prostate Contouring in Patients with Bilateral Hip Prostheses: Impact of Using Artifact-Reduced CT Images and MRI. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956069.
Elzibak, A, Loblaw, A, Morton, G, Vesprini, D, Liu, S, Chung, H, and Davidson, M. 2016. "SU-F-J-161: Prostate Contouring in Patients with Bilateral Hip Prostheses: Impact of Using Artifact-Reduced CT Images and MRI". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4956069.
@article{osti_22634762,
title = {SU-F-J-161: Prostate Contouring in Patients with Bilateral Hip Prostheses: Impact of Using Artifact-Reduced CT Images and MRI},
author = {Elzibak, A and Loblaw, A and Morton, G and Vesprini, D and Liu, S and Chung, H and Davidson, M},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To investigate the usefulness of metal artifact reduction in CT images of patients with bilateral hip prostheses (BHP) for contouring the prostate and determine if the inclusion of MR images provides additional benefits. Methods: Five patients with BHP were CT scanned using our clinical protocol (140kV, 300mAs, 3mm slices, 1.5mm increment, Philips Medical Systems, OH). Images were reconstructed with the orthopaedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) algorithm. MRI scanning was then performed (1.5T, GE Healthcare, WI) with a flat table-top (T{sub 2}-weighted, inherent body coil, FRFSE, 3mm slices with 0mm gap). All images were transferred to Pinnacle (Version 9.2, Philips Medical Systems). For each patient, two data sets were produced: one containing the O-MAR-corrected CT images and another containing fused MRI and O-MAR-corrected CT images. Four genito-urinary radiation oncologists contoured the prostate of each patient on the O-MAR-corrected CT data. Two weeks later, they contoured the prostate on the fused data set, blinded to all other contours. During each contouring session, the oncologists reported their confidence in the contours (1=very confident, 3=not confident) and the contouring difficulty that they experienced (1=really easy, 4=very challenging). Prostate volumes were computed from the contours and the conformity index was used to evaluate inter-observer variability. Results: Larger prostate volumes were found on the O-MAR-corrected CT set than on the fused set (p< 0.05, median=36.9cm{sup 3} vs. 26.63 cm{sup 3}). No significant differences were noted in the inter-observer variability between the two data sets (p=0.3). Contouring difficulty decreased with the addition of MRI (p<0.05) while the radiation oncologists reported more confidence in their contours when MRI was fused with the O-MAR-corrected CT data (p<0.05). Conclusion: This preliminary work demonstrated that, while O-MAR correction to CT images improves visualization of anatomy, the addition of MRI enhanced the oncologists’ confidence in contouring the prostate in patients with BHP.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4956069},
journal = {Medical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
  • Prostate cancer patients with bilateral hip prostheses require additional planning and treatment considerations. Visualization of the organs at risk (OAR) and the planning target volume (PTV) is hindered by the large amount of artifact streaking between the metallic implants. The density of this area must be accounted for when using heterogeneity correction. Fusion of a megavolt computed tomography (MVCT) to the planning CT aids in viewing the prostate, bladder, and rectum, and implantation of 6 fiducial markers along the posterior border of the prostate helps with the delineation between it and the rectum. When planning, the amount of beam entrymore » angles is limited because of the position of the prostheses and prevents the use of any lateral beams. Therefore, TomoTherapy presents an effective option for these patients because of the ability to use a directional block, which prevents any primary beams from entering through the bilateral hip prostheses (but the beams may exit through the structures), use of MVCT for daily localization, and delivery of radiation with intensity modulation allows for effective sparing of the OAR.« less
  • Dose distributions for prostate radiotherapy are difficult to predict in patients with bilateral hip prostheses in situ, due to image distortions and difficulty in dose calculation. The feasibility of delivering curative doses to prostate using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with bilateral hip prostheses was evaluated. Planning target volumes for prostate only (PTV1) and pelvic nodes (PTV2) were generated from data on 5 patients. PTV1 and PTV2 dose prescriptions were 70 Gy and 60 Gy, respectively, in 35 fractions, and an additional nodal boost of 65 Gy was added for 1 plan. Rectum, bladder, and bowel were also delineated. Beammore » angles and segments were chosen to best avoid entering through the prostheses. Dose-volume data were assessed with respect to clinical objectives. The plans achieved the required prescription doses to the PTVs. Five-field IMRT plans were adequate for patients with relatively small prostheses (head volumes<60 cm{sup 3}) but 7-field plans were required for patients with larger prostheses. Bowel and bladder doses were clinically acceptable for all patients. Rectal doses were deemed clinically acceptable, although the V{sub 50} {sub Gy} objective was not met for 4/5 patients. We describe an IMRT solution for patients with bilateral hip prostheses of varying size and shape, requiring either localized or whole pelvic radiotherapy for prostate cancer.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) algorithm on CT image quality and dose calculation for patients with spinal prostheses near spinal tumors. Methods: A CT electron density phantom was scanned twice: with tissue-simulating inserts only, and with a titanium insert replacing solid water. A patient plan was mapped to the phantom images in two ways: with the titanium inside or outside of the spinal tumor. Pinnacle and Eclipse were used to evaluate the dosimetric effects of O-MAR on 12-bit and 16-bit CT data, respectively. CT images from five patients with spinal prostheses weremore » reconstructed with and without O-MAR. Two observers assessed the image quality improvement from O-MAR. Both pencil beam and Monte Carlo dose calculation in iPlan were used for the patient study. The percentage differences between non-OMAR and O-MAR datasets were calculated for PTV-min, PTV-max, PTV-mean, PTV-V100, PTV-D90, OAR-V10Gy, OAR-max, and OAR-D0.1cc. Results: O-MAR improved image quality but did not significantly affect the dose distributions and DVHs for both 12-bit and 16- bit CT phantom data. All five patient cases demonstrated some degree of image quality improvement from O-MAR, ranging from small to large metal artifact reduction. For pencil beam, the largest discrepancy was observed for OARV-10Gy at 5.4%, while the other seven parameters were ≤0.6%. For Monte Carlo, the differences between non-O-MAR and O-MAR datasets were ≤3.0%. Conclusion: Both phantom and patient studies indicated that O-MAR can substantially reduce metal artifacts on CT images, allowing better visualization of the anatomical structures and metal objects. The dosimetric impact of O-MAR was insignificant regardless of the metal location, image bit-depth, and dose calculation algorithm. O-MAR corrected images are recommended for radiation treatment planning on patients with spinal prostheses because of the improved image quality and no need to modify current dose constraints. This work was supported by a research grant from Philips Healthcare. Paul Klahr is an employee of Philips Healthcare.« less
  • Purpose: The use of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) enables compensation for prostate movement by shifting the treatment isocenter to track the prostate on a daily basis. Although shifting the isocenter can alter the source to skin distances (SSDs) and the effective depth of the target volume, it is commonly assumed that these changes have a negligible dosimetric effect, and therefore, the number of monitor units delivered is usually not adjusted. However, it is unknown whether or not this assumption is valid for patient with hip prostheses, which frequently contain high density materials. Methods: The authors conducted a retrospective studymore » to investigate dosimetric effect of the isocenter shifting method for prostate patients with and without hip prostheses. For each patient, copies of the prostate volume were shifted by up to 1.5 cm from the original position to simulate prostate movement in 0.5 cm increments. Subsequently, 12 plans were created for each patient by creating a copy of the original plan for each prostate position with the isocenter shifted to track the position of the shifted prostate. The dose to the prostate was then recalculated for each plan. For patients with hip prostheses, plans were created both with and without lateral beam angles entering through the prostheses. Results: Without isocenter shifting to compensate for prostate motion of 1.5 cm, the dose to the 95% of the prostate (D-95%) changed by an average of 30% and by up to 64%. This was reduced to less than 3% with the isocenter shifting method. It was found that for patients with hip prostheses, this technique worked best for treatment plans that avoided beam angles passing through the prostheses. Conclusions: The results demonstrated that the isocenter shifting method can accurately deliver dose to the prostate even in patients with hip prostheses.« less
  • Purpose: To compare IMRT planning strategies for prostate cancer patients with metal hip prostheses.Methods: All plans were generated fully automatically (i.e., no human trial-and-error interactions) using iCycle, the authors' in-house developed algorithm for multicriterial selection of beam angles and optimization of fluence profiles, allowing objective comparison of planning strategies. For 18 prostate cancer patients (eight with bilateral hip prostheses, ten with a right-sided unilateral prosthesis), two planning strategies were evaluated: (i) full exclusion of beams containing beamlets that would deliver dose to the target after passing a prosthesis (IMRT{sub remove}) and (ii) exclusion of those beamlets only (IMRT{sub cut}). Plansmore » with optimized coplanar and noncoplanar beam arrangements were generated. Differences in PTV coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) were quantified. The impact of beam number on plan quality was evaluated.Results: Especially for patients with bilateral hip prostheses, IMRT{sub cut} significantly improved rectum and bladder sparing compared to IMRT{sub remove}. For 9-beam coplanar plans, rectum V{sub 60Gy} reduced by 17.5%{+-} 15.0% (maximum 37.4%, p= 0.036) and rectum D{sub mean} by 9.4%{+-} 7.8% (maximum 19.8%, p= 0.036). Further improvements in OAR sparing were achievable by using noncoplanar beam setups, reducing rectum V{sub 60Gy} by another 4.6%{+-} 4.9% (p= 0.012) for noncoplanar 9-beam IMRT{sub cut} plans. Large reductions in rectum dose delivery were also observed when increasing the number of beam directions in the plans. For bilateral implants, the rectum V{sub 60Gy} was 37.3%{+-} 12.1% for coplanar 7-beam plans and reduced on average by 13.5% (maximum 30.1%, p= 0.012) for 15 directions.Conclusions: iCycle was able to automatically generate high quality plans for prostate cancer patients with prostheses. Excluding only beamlets that passed through the prostheses (IMRT{sub cut} strategy) significantly improved OAR sparing. Noncoplanar beam arrangements and, to a larger extent, increasing the number of treatment beams further improved plan quality.« less